(partially) new Tundra coming?

Todd n Natalie

Observer
I think it is EV only up to 18mph. I haven’t read anything about range but who cares at 18mph??
No plug on either truck.
Surprisingly, the head engineer said the hybrid was designed more for power boost, not mpg. He says people don’t care about MPG or EV-range. I guess I’m in the minority.
Ah. Oops. MPH not Miles. Well... meh. Yeah, I agree, I'd rather see a boost in EV range or MPG. Count me in that minority too.

I think Ford is working on a PHEV F150 to sell along with the Lightning. Maybe Toyota is working on one as well?
 

bkg

Explorer
I think it is EV only up to 18mph. I haven’t read anything about range but who cares at 18mph??
No plug on either truck.
Surprisingly, the head engineer said the hybrid was designed more for power boost, not mpg. He says people don’t care about MPG or EV-range. I guess I’m in the minority.
I can see it being a distinct advantage when starting from stop with a large trailer....
 
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Deleted member 9101

Guest
I'd take a Toyota hybrid over a Ford hybrid any day.

Why is that? Fords system uses a better battery and can be used as a generator... Toyotas system is already outdated and you lose interior space...lol.

Ford has probably built more hybrid vehicles than Toyota and theirs have been very reliable.
 

jmodz

Active member
Ford has probably built more hybrid vehicles than Toyota and theirs have been very reliable.
Umm no. Toyota has lead in hybrid sales for the past 22 years. In 2019 they sold over half of all hybrids. So toyota has definitely built a ton more hybrids than Ford. However, Ford is selling a lot of hybrid vehicles this year. I have no idea whether they’ll actually outsell Toyota though. Each company is clearly going full steam ahead with hybrid powertrains.
 

phsycle

Adventurer
Umm no. Toyota has lead in hybrid sales for the past 22 years. In 2019 they sold over half of all hybrids. So toyota has definitely built a ton more hybrids than Ford. However, Ford is selling a lot of hybrid vehicles this year. I have no idea whether they’ll actually outsell Toyota though. Each company is clearly going full steam ahead with hybrid powertrains.
I do hope that this is a stepping stone to a PHEV version with a decent EV range. Their Prius and Rav phev’s are excellent.
 

brycercampbell

Active member
Funny thing is, the hybrid layout is essentially the same as Ford’s 🤣 It couldn’t have been a more direct copy from the 3.5L TT, boxed frame, alu panels…

I think it’s an improvement over the current Gen (except for that hideous front end).
The hybrid layout means nothing to me, I'm referring exclusively to reliability and longevity.
 

brycercampbell

Active member
Why is that? Fords system uses a better battery and can be used as a generator... Toyotas system is already outdated and you lose interior space...lol.

Ford has probably built more hybrid vehicles than Toyota and theirs have been very reliable.
See above. Anyone who wants a reliable car gets a Toyota, that's been true for decades. I don't think this will change. The sad thing is that electric isn't the future. Hydrogen is. The amount of money to make electric work (and revamp the grid) is unrealistic.
 

ChasingOurTrunks

Well-known member
phsycle said:
I think it is EV only up to 18mph. I haven’t read anything about range but who cares at 18mph??
No plug on either truck.
Surprisingly, the head engineer said the hybrid was designed more for power boost, not mpg. He says people don’t care about MPG or EV-range. I guess I’m in the minority.
I can see it being a distinct advantage when starting from stop with a large trailer....
EDIT 9/22: @rruff has advised a few posts later that my understanding was incorrect -- it's not that the electric motor ONLY works up to 18 MPH, just that the gas engine ALWAYS works over 18 MPH. Therefore, what I wrote below may not be totally accurate for the new Tundra.

_____________________

That's a surprise. Its not like many people are drag racing their Toyota trucks and "need" that power off the line, but if the EV is limited to 18 mph, they won't be using it anywhere else. Towing a trailer is a good point of where this would be an advantage, but that's a pretty niche use case (the majority of trucks only tow occasionally - I'm thinking maybe not often enough to justify a hybrid system on that point alone). The same advantages to trailer towing apply off road -- handy torque down low -- but so does the niche use case argument.

I think there's likely an element of the head engineer wordsmithing a bit here, because most of the design considerations from all brands these days seems to be about fitting regulations (i.e. CAFE standards) not function. So, he might say "It's not about MPG or EV range, it's about power off the line" and that makes car guys like me happy, because we all know that more power is more better. But that power off the line in a practical sense mostly just helps with MPGs and doesn't really do anything else for the truck, other than maybe improve driver experience. But the majority of the impact will be in MPG numbers.

Starting from a dead stop usually goes like this (highly simplified):

1st Gear, 0 to 20 KPH, engine goes from 800 to 3600 RPM and the trans shifts.
2nd gear, 20 kph to 40 kph, Engine goes from 800 to 3600 RPM and the trans shifts again
3rd gear, 40 kph to 60 kph, engine goes from 800 to 3600 and shifts. again
etc. until highway speed or 10th gear.

If they can use the electric motors to go from 0 to 30 kph, they are eliminating the engine from spooling up to 3600 RPM twice as it works through its gears. That spooling up uses a lot of fuel -- if your vehicle has "instant fuel economy", try to keep an eye on it next time you pull away from a stop. My cruising at highway speeds uses about 13-14 l/100 kms. Accelerating from a stop shows my instant fuel economy spiking to over 30 l/100 kms (which I think is as high as the gauge goes).

So, the Hybrid might be intended as a "power boost". More power is reason enough for me, and fits the "Hell Yeah, Trucks!" marketing narrative -- But likely, the real world impact is better MPGs for a big heavy truck to help Toyota match CAFE standards.
 
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phsycle

Adventurer
The hybrid layout means nothing to me, I'm referring exclusively to reliability and longevity.
I don’t want to get into brand wars here, because I honestly don’t have loyalty to any particular manufacturer. But what are you basing this on? 15-20 years ago, I’d agree with you. Now, new trucks and vehicles are so integrated globally, I can’t put one over the other. Especially on the EV/hybrid front where it’s still relatively new tech and all have similar issues. I just haven’t found the, now archaic adage of, “you want reliability, go with good ol’ Yota” to be true. This is coming from someone who’s past and current vehicle inventory consists of 10:1 ratio of Toyota vs others owned.
 
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Deleted member 9101

Guest
See above. Anyone who wants a reliable car gets a Toyota, that's been true for decades. I don't think this will change.

L m a o... My last two trucks were Tundra's....they need more repairs that any domestic truck that I've owned. My in-laws Camry has been in the more shop more times than any vehicle that I've ever owned.

I have two Fords in my garage....both cost less than a comparable Toyota and have been just as reliable.

Toyotas glory days are long behind them....even Hyundai has matched their quality and reliability.
 
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85_Ranger4x4

Well-known member
L m a o... My last two trucks were Tundra's....they need more repairs that any domestic truck that I've owned. My in-laws Camry has been in the more shop more times than any vehicle that I've ever owned.

I have two Fords in my garage....both cost less than a comparable Toyota and have been just as reliable.

Toyotas glory days are long behind them....even Hyundai has matched their quality and reliability.
Toyota literally held Ford's hand and got them into hybrids in the first place...
 
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