(partially) new Tundra coming?

bkg

Explorer
Twin turbos on a V6
Fully boxed frame
Aluminum body panels
10 speed transmission

Pretty much copied the things that makes the F150 successful...lol.

What's hilarious is they are all things that the Toyota loyalist said we're unnecessary/overly complicated on a 1/2 ton truck.
The fanboys definitely will drop their "Toyota got it right in 07, so they don't need to change anything... " mantra quickly.
 

bkg

Explorer
I want to say about mid way through, they called it a tri-design, combination of boxed, c-channel and sub frame I believe?

Sent from my Pixel 3 XL using Tapatalk
so they didn't actually change the frame? /hmmm.
 

rruff

Explorer
Honestly, the whole go fast suspension just doesn't suit my style of off-roading.
Long stretches of washboard are my main "obstacle", and big tires aired down seem to be best solution for that.

The fanboys definitely will drop their "Toyota got it right in 07, so they don't need to change anything... " mantra quickly.
So far I haven't seen anything on the new model that would make me want to buy one. Yes, a lot of things have changed because upgrading to current tech/standards was necessary... at least every 15 years. :ROFLMAO:

I don't know where you are finding the "fanboys" but on Tundra forums the shortcomings are well known and discussed. So is the fact that you can sell your used one with 150k miles for a relatively ridiculous amount of money if it's been well maintained. That and the lower hassle and cost to repair is the main reason to own one.
 

phsycle

Adventurer
According to Toyota, it’s a fully boxed frame:

“The key themes atop the whiteboard for Tundra chassis engineers included improve capability and ride comfort compared to the competition. The team found great benefit in moving to a fully boxed frame, which improved rigidity significantly compared to current generation and offered overall improvement in capability.”

 

bkg

Explorer
Long stretches of washboard are my main "obstacle", and big tires aired down seem to be best solution for that.



So far I haven't seen anything on the new model that would make me want to buy one. Yes, a lot of things have changed because upgrading to current tech/standards was necessary... at least every 15 years. :ROFLMAO:

I don't know where you are finding the "fanboys" but on Tundra forums the shortcomings are well known and discussed. So is the fact that you can sell your used one with 150k miles for a relatively ridiculous amount of money if it's been well maintained. That and the lower hassle and cost to repair is the main reason to own one.
plenty fanboys and apologists in this forum.


EDIT: it will be interesting to see what this does to the price of 07-21 Tundra's. I bet we see a price increase.
 
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dstock

Explorer
According to Toyota, it’s a fully boxed frame:

“The key themes atop the whiteboard for Tundra chassis engineers included improve capability and ride comfort compared to the competition. The team found great benefit in moving to a fully boxed frame, which improved rigidity significantly compared to current generation and offered overall improvement in capability.”

Sorry guys, I was multi-tasking while I was watching the video and missed the line "current generation has the tri-design", it is in fact a fully boxed frame which is why they switched to coil springs in the rear to improve the ride over leaf springs, given the 20% increase in rigidity in the front and a 10% rigidity in the rear.

Obviously I know very little about the Tundras', we have a JKU Rubicon and a 5th Gen 4Runner and I have been recently considering a full size truck for a variety of reasons. I've previously owned a Ford Ranger and F150 so normally I'm a Ford truck guy. However, we briefly owned 2016 Ford Escape that we purchased new and it was utter garbage, multiple trips to the shop in the first year of owner ship so we ditched it and purchased the 4Runner. Given the Escape and the recent and continuing Bronco rollout debacle, I'm sadly less inclined to go with a Ford.
 

brycercampbell

Active member
While the OG and 2nd gen Tundra (07+) are incredible, unstoppable machines, and while I am disappointed that there is no 5.7 option in this new one, it's obvious that Tundra is attempting to go mainstream again. I think it'll will be a success, relatively speaking. If the pricing is good, that's all it'll take to compete with the others. I'd take a Toyota hybrid over a Ford hybrid any day. Design wise, everyone hates new designs. Give it a year, it'll grow on you. Performance stats look decent too.
 

86scotty

Explorer
The payload really isn't that bad for half ton. Sure there are some f-150s that have higher payload. But the majority of them aren't that much higher especially if you don't want a super long wheelbase. They'll probably be trucks that aren't TRD pro around 1600.

You can get a Tundra with a factory 3-in lift. Throw a Super Pacific camper on it and be set. The biggest downside is a TRD pro starts at $65k. At that price I would just get a power wagon.
Fixed that for you. :)
 

Todd n Natalie

Observer
Funny thing is, the hybrid layout is essentially the same as Ford’s 🤣 It couldn’t have been a more direct copy from the 3.5L TT, boxed frame, alu panels…

I think it’s an improvement over the current Gen (except for that hideous front end).
The hybrid is neat and all (Ford and Toyota) but I wonder if I'd rather have the extra payload and underseat storage? :unsure:

I wonder how long it would take to recoup the extra money spent on having a hybrid vs more mpg? Maybe you'd make it up in resale?
 

phsycle

Adventurer
The hybrid is neat and all (Ford and Toyota) but I wonder if I'd rather have the extra payload and underseat storage? :unsure:

I wonder how long it would take to recoup the extra money spent on having a hybrid vs more mpg? Maybe you'd make it up in resale?
It would’ve made sense for me, IF there was an electric only mode with a range of >30 miles. Don’t care for it otherwise.
 

Todd n Natalie

Observer
It would’ve made sense for me, IF there was an electric only mode with a range of >30 miles. Don’t care for it otherwise.
I *think* you can drive on battery only for 18 miles with the '22 Tundra? I do not believe you an drive on battery only with the F150 PowerBoost. But, correct me if I am wrong on either.
 

phsycle

Adventurer
I *think* you can drive on battery only for 18 miles with the '22 Tundra? I do not believe you an drive on battery only with the F150 PowerBoost. But, correct me if I am wrong on either.
I think it is EV only up to 18mph. I haven’t read anything about range but who cares at 18mph??
No plug on either truck.
Surprisingly, the head engineer said the hybrid was designed more for power boost, not mpg. He says people don’t care about MPG or EV-range. I guess I’m in the minority.
 
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