OVRLND camper topper

#1
Hi all I just wanted to introduce myself and my new topper. I used to live in a Roamin Chariot for 2 years and at the time I loved it. During that 2 years I made a running list of things I would change or add to make living out of my truck much easier, and now am at the point with a product that I think some of you will be interested in. Like other models hitting the market it is a camper shell, making it's dry weight sub 300lbs. It has vertical walls making for so much more available room allowing for the entire sidewall to be used as possible storage or counter space. The inside of the topper also has exposed framing making it easy to hard point anything anywhere. It will also come with extrusion running along the sides to make it easy to attach anything without drilling (not pictured). All the sides and top are sheet aluminum, making it easy to add a vent or window extremely easy.

The topper also has a vertical pop top rather than a wedge for several reasons. The main reason is how difficult it is for two people living together in a small space with a wedge. For 6 months I shared the Roamin Chariot with my SO and it was really tight. It was hard for someone to relax on the bed with someone cooking below. The OVRLND has a inside standing height of 6'5" and on the bed over the cab nearly 36" of sitting room, making it easy for two people to be doing different things on a rainy day. In the picture Brian is 6'2". The overall goal of this is to make the roomiest most adaptable camper possible. I think the idea of adding anything you want as needed is an important part of any adventure!

I have a website up but not running yet at campovrlnd.com. Drop an email on the website and I can answer any further questions. Since I live in Flagstaff I will be at Overland west with the camper if anyone wants to come look at it. The plan is to be in production in the next two months and the pricing will be in range of all the other toppers coming onto the market. Ill have firm pricing in the next week when the site goes live with special pricing for the first few off the line. The campers will also be made on a job to job basis, so I welcome any size truck and or accessory requests.

Hope you all are having a great kick off to the new week,
Jay

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#6
I really like the "straight up" configuration rather than the "dreaded wedgie".

Q: is the top a platform rather than a 'boxtop' (meaning with some vertical sides), and if so, will it support a rack with all the floatsom & jetsom we so much like to pile on?

Q: how is raising accomplished? standard Armstrong method, cross pistons, screwjacks & cordless drill?

looking forward to the website opening; thanks
 
#7
I really like the "straight up" configuration rather than the "dreaded wedgie".

Q: is the top a platform rather than a 'boxtop' (meaning with some vertical sides), and if so, will it support a rack with all the floatsom & jetsom we so much like to pile on?

Q: how is raising accomplished? standard Armstrong method, cross pistons, screwjacks & cordless drill?

looking forward to the website opening; thanks
Yeah, so much more room for two people and a cook set-up inside the camper.

Could you elaborate on your first question? The top does have rack rails to throw rack rails and a rack or box on top. It would require you to lift that extra weight though.

Raising is the standard armstrong method with constructed from the same ealuminum as the frame. Gas struts will be an option if you want to cut down on the overall force to get it up.

Great, the website should be up early next week with more details, pricing, and pictures.
 

DaveInDenver

Expedition Leader
#8
Digging it. What's it look like inside with the top down? Just wondering what you plan to do to retain the fabric and how condensation and moisture might factor in to stuff inside.
 
#9
...Could you elaborate on your first question? ...
if I lift the top (roof), will there be 2 sides & 2 ends of any width dimension attached to it, or is the top a flat "lid" with no edging? I assume the edges (for lack of better descriptive turn) would give the top some resistance to flex - at the expense of weight, of course.
 
#10
Digging it. What's it look like inside with the top down? Just wondering what you plan to do to retain the fabric and how condensation and moisture might factor in to stuff inside.
With the top down it is still the same amount of usable space as a normal camper shell. The canvas stays towards the roof and so does the lifting mechanism. There are some removable bungees that help pull it in and keep it high. Just like other campers, condensation does collect on colder days but with the door or windows open is quick to escape.

Ill be sure to put a picture of the inside with the top down on the website.
 
#11
if I lift the top (roof), will there be 2 sides & 2 ends of any width dimension attached to it, or is the top a flat "lid" with no edging? I assume the edges (for lack of better descriptive turn) would give the top some resistance to flex - at the expense of weight, of course.
I'm still not sure I entirely understand what you're looking for, so I'll explain some parts of the roof. The roof and mechanism are just like any other pop top camper except for unique design changes to certain aspects. My left mechanism is different than ATC and FWC, but along the same lines. I also have rolled the roof tubes to have an ark so that it can take more stress from snow/rack weight. Currently there is no edgeing to cover the tarp gap when closed, though on all future models there will be.

Let me know if this at all answers what your were looking to have answered.... sorry I'm just a tad confused.
 

DaveInDenver

Expedition Leader
#12
With the top down it is still the same amount of usable space as a normal camper shell. The canvas stays towards the roof and so does the lifting mechanism. There are some removable bungees that help pull it in and keep it high. Just like other campers, condensation does collect on colder days but with the door or windows open is quick to escape.

Ill be sure to put a picture of the inside with the top down on the website.
Thank you for the description, just trying to picture how you're dealing with things. I have a WilderNest, which is my comparison.
 
#13
https://www.cyberpac.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2014/07/lift-off-box.jpg

I know this is awkward without the ability to post a picture but i'm giving it a shot: if the top of the box (in my link) were a flat sheet, most likely it would depress in the center. But since it has edges (vertical sides) attached, there's probably a bit of resistance offered to it bending.

now, and I know we're on a sleigh ride!, is the top of your camper (a) flat, or (b) does it have sides?
 
#14
https://www.cyberpac.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2014/07/lift-off-box.jpg

I know this is awkward without the ability to post a picture but i'm giving it a shot: if the top of the box (in my link) were a flat sheet, most likely it would depress in the center. But since it has edges (vertical sides) attached, there's probably a bit of resistance offered to it bending.

now, and I know we're on a sleigh ride!, is the top of your camper (a) flat, or (b) does it have sides?
Ahhh, I see. the top is a lid with no sides, but as I mentioned earlier the top is arched so it is not flat but has a slight curve. Therefore when loaded compresses to a flatter plane and does not sag. Does that help? Sorry it took me several attempts to understand.
 
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