Overland Pros Anza 2000 RTT Feedback

snowfiend

Member
I'm in the market for a large RTT to hold two adults and two kids (5 & 8) to be installed on a F150 with bed rack (6.5" bed). Found this local company Overland Pros which has a bit different design, but there aren't very many reviews compared to brands like CVT, Tepui, Roofnest, etc. What turns me off to some of these other brands is all the awnings and guyouts needed to support the extended rainfly that covers the door/ladder and the extra side awnings. Those just seem like a magnet for wind to cause issues and of course takes longer to set up/put away. With the Anza 2000 there are no side awnings, just large zipper windows like a regular tent would have. A rainfly with springbars on each end can be used (or rolled up out of the way/completely removed), but that's all the setup needed besides leveling and deploying the ladder.

I understand most don't have first-had experience with the Anza 2000 given the lack of reviews, but would appreciate comments from a design perspective. It's also hard to find pictures/feedback of "minimally deployed" RTT's with awnings and rain flys rolled up/stowed/removed.

Looking for something as close to 80"L as I can get, longer than 80" is going to hang a decent amount off the end of the 6.5" bed so I think the 87" tents are out (CVT Denali, 23zero Walkabout 87). I also don't want to deal with trying to level two ladders if it can be avoided.

Sleeping area is 79Lx96Wx52H, 141 lbs. https://overlandpros.com/product/anza-2000/

Below is the Anza 2000 compared to the OVS Nomadic 4. Both are roughly the same size but the Anza seems like it will set up much faster. If you stow the RTT with the rain fly rolled up (or off completely), just pop it open and it's ready to use.

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NatersXJ6

Explorer
So, it looks like a mildly different take on a standard rooftop tent. I guess I never thought of the 2 side windows and 4 associated spring rods as a major time issue. I’m guessing that the additional weather resistance of a more typical tent is probably worth the time of the window spring rods, should you choose to deploy them (I always have the side windows open) in both my Tepui and CVT tents. The only hard closure I had was when snow was being driven sideways into one side.

In any event, I think you will be fine with this, a Tepui Kukenam 4 or the CVT Denali. I have the Denali right now, and love it, although my former Tepui seemed better in a few design elements. They all have compromise and opportunity at that price point.
 

snowfiend

Member
I have a question since you have a Denali. I noticed that under the canopy there is a gap for the canopy bar that is open to the outside. Don't you get flying bugs and things inside your tent? My experience has been mosquitos and yellowjackets will find any opening in your tent possible, and this seems like a pretty big gap. In May I had flying ants cover the inside of a tent because of a two 1/8" gaps and DO NOT want to repeat that.

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NatersXJ6

Explorer
I haven’t paid very much attention to that gap, I’m fairly certain there is a small flap over it, but in any event, it is usually covered by the mattress and my kids tend to stuff things in the corners. We haven’t noticed much in the way of bug intrusion, but I also don’t usually camp in high-bug areas, and I don’t think any RTT will hold up to something like mosquitoes in the way a good backpacking tent does.

There are rare times I wish I didn’t have the extended version of the tent, because I don’t use the annex very often, but the times I do use the annex so far have offset the minor annoyance of dealing with the cover at each set-up. If I was to buy again, I would probably buy a non-extended version and figure out something different for the annex area, basically dealing with your concerns.

As far as interior space, it is common to yell at my littles “Stop running around in the tent!”

The only real drawback is that the base is heavy and it takes a bit of strength to set up and more importantly, fold up the tent. Big stuff is heavier than little stuff… go figure.
 

NatersXJ6

Explorer
It would be interesting to see one of these Overland Pros in person. It looks like there are 2-3 layers of fabric that all roll down? I’m thinking that could catch leaves/dirt/water? Maybe they are always zipped up in those conditions, but that sounds like it would get stuffy and humid really quickly.
 

snowfiend

Member
It would be interesting to see one of these Overland Pros in person. It looks like there are 2-3 layers of fabric that all roll down? I’m thinking that could catch leaves/dirt/water? Maybe they are always zipped up in those conditions, but that sounds like it would get stuffy and humid really quickly.
It would be. I talked to the owner about trying to see one in person this week but he didn't get back to me. I just found a deal on a like-new CVT Denali standard fly with annex/weathercover/insulation and am going to look at it tonight.
 

NatersXJ6

Explorer
It would be. I talked to the owner about trying to see one in person this week but he didn't get back to me. I just found a deal on a like-new CVT Denali standard fly with annex/weathercover/insulation and am going to look at it tonight.
Good luck. It’s hard to go wrong with the Denali you’re trying to fit a lot of people.
 
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