Overhang calculation non-USA countries

Fred Skywalker

New member
Wondering if someone can help me understand the overhang calculation that many countries have outside of the U.S. I understand the 60% of the wheelbase part but I'm confused on if anything attached to the back of the camper is part of that calculation or is it considered a "projected load". For example, lets say the finished camper comes in at the maximum length of the 60% calc without a spare tire. Now lets add a spare tire to the back. Does that put the truck over the limit or is the spare tire considered "projected load".
 

Sitec

Adventurer
Hi Fred.

The way I understand it, 60% has to include everything (including spare wheels). This is why I recessed the spare wheels in under the body on our build. Here's where you look if in Australia:-

 

Fred Skywalker

New member
Hi Fred.

The way I understand it, 60% has to include everything (including spare wheels). This is why I recessed the spare wheels in under the body on our build. Here's where you look if in Australia:-

That was my understanding as well and then I started reading the Aussie sections on "projected load" and then I wasn't so sure. Projected load applies to say a pickup truck carrying wood that's longer than the bed. The legality of this is defined under the projected load section. So I wasn't sure how a spare tire or say a motorcycle rack would be treated.
 

Sitec

Adventurer
I'm guessing that if it's bolted on it's part of the vehicle, but if it's tied on, then it's classed as a load...
 

Geo.Lander

Active member
Wondering if someone can help me understand the overhang calculation that many countries have outside of the U.S. I understand the 60% of the wheelbase part but I'm confused on if anything attached to the back of the camper is part of that calculation or is it considered a "projected load". For example, lets say the finished camper comes in at the maximum length of the 60% calc without a spare tire. Now lets add a spare tire to the back. Does that put the truck over the limit or is the spare tire considered "projected load".
Yes, any lifts or permanently mounted racks etc is part of the calculation and that would include spares or any motorcycle lift. At least in Norway which normally follows EC laws..
 

Geo.Lander

Active member
Better to know that now than build a fantastic rig only to be told no at the first foreign port arrival. :)
I think in most cases you would not have an issue if the truck is legal and follows it's country specific rules concerning rebuilding. I do not think the host country would/could impose its own vehicular rules for guests?
I know Norway has rules for over 3500kgs vehicles having "official" snow tires but apart from that I dont think even the road administration here would go that far, unless it was obviously unsafe and ridiculous..
 

Iain_U1250

Explorer
I did hear of one of the GXVs or Unicats with some extra storage boxes and a spare tyre at the backof the truck being refused entry here in Australia becasue of the 60% rule. They took the boxes off, returned to the rego office and got registration. Then put the suff back on. There are certain things they will give temporary exemptions for, like a Left hand Drive, but some rules are enforced strictly. This is Ron's truck. PICT2261.JPG

Here is a link to his blog - he doesn't mention it.

 
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