Operating cost of earthcruisers?

Howard70

Adventurer
.... recommendations that do not include the spare,,,
Hello Glen:

We've always rotated our spares through. On Prima Terra we had two spares rotated along with the running tires for a total of 6. With Prima Terra II we only have a tire on one spare so we'll rotate 5.

Waveslider - the only reason I can imagine a tire guy would suggest not rotating a spare into the mix would be you'd buy tires sooner (along you'd buy fewer)!

Any reasons offered for why rotating spares (especially at a 5,000 mile frequency) isn't advised? I assume Fuso's reluctance would be because they assume the trucks have duels in the rear, so adding a spare would be confusing?

Howard
 

Cruisn

Adventurer
Hello Glen:

We've always rotated our spares through. On Prima Terra we had two spares rotated along with the running tires for a total of 6. With Prima Terra II we only have a tire on one spare so we'll rotate 5.

Waveslider - the only reason I can imagine a tire guy would suggest not rotating a spare into the mix would be you'd buy tires sooner (along you'd buy fewer)!

Any reasons offered for why rotating spares (especially at a 5,000 mile frequency) isn't advised? I assume Fuso's reluctance would be because they assume the trucks have duels in the rear, so adding a spare would be confusing?

Howard
Most medium sized trucks that run dual rears also run the same size front tyre/rim. all my trucks have. from isuzu to mitsubishi. the lack of changing them is from what I have expieranced is that the rears wear out quicker anyways under weight and you always want good condition steers.
 

waveslider

Outdoorsman
Waveslider - the only reason I can imagine a tire guy would suggest not rotating a spare into the mix would be you'd buy tires sooner (along you'd buy fewer)!
Its been a LOOONG time since I had that conversation so I can't even recall the key points he had made. I was planning to return to the practice with the Kenworth and I'm gathering the necessary heavy-duty tools in order to accomplish it myself.
Glad to hear I won't be the only one doing it.

Are you all using the "normal" rotation patterns for 4wd with a spare? (See below) or something different? Sorry OP for the thread drift but at least its somewhat related to operating cost.

 

gregmchugh

Observer
When I had about 18,000 miles on our GXV Kenworth Patagonia I stopped in to the Goodyear Commercial Tire dealer in Springfield MO who supplies the tires to GXV to ask about tire rotation. They looked at the Goodyear G278 tires and did not recommend a rotation based on the wear of the rather large lugs on these tires. Looking at the front to rear wear on the lugs was the indicator used to determine when tire rotation was needed. As long as there wasn’t a significant difference in tread thickness between the front and back of the lugs there was no reason to rotate as long as there was no other wear pattern on the tires. When the lugs do show the difference in lug depth then the rotation is from side to side to even out the wear. You can also rotate front and rear to even out wear between drive and steer tires as long as you also do side to side was the recommendation. I now have 33, 000 miles and plan to have them look at them again next week to see if rotation is recommended.

I also had them look at a damaged lug on the side of one tire that probably happened from road debris at some point. The lug looked pretty badly damaged to me but after poking around with an ice pick they said that there was no damage to the structure of the tire and no reason to not keep using the tire. After another 15,000 miles I have seen no change to the damaged lug.

Waveslider, I had a brief look your truck today at GXV, looks nice. We are stopping back in tomorrow morning to finish dropping off our truck for service and I want to get a better look.
 

waveslider

Outdoorsman
Good info Greg. We have a Goodyear Ag supplier here that I intend to consult as our tires wear in. Impressive mileage you're seeing with even wear. My previous experience with large lug tires (albeit much smaller) was that it was difficult to spot wear patterns so it will be a learning process.

The other reason I intend to rotate the spare in is because when the time comes to get a new set, if I want to try something different I don't have a Gs worth of fresh rubber to try and offload for pennies on the dollar. :)
 

Howard70

Adventurer
The other reason I intend to rotate the spare in is because when the time comes to get a new set, if I want to try something different I don't have a Gs worth of fresh rubber to try and offload for pennies on the dollar. :)
This is a great point. Also, carrying a spare around without use for the several years it might take to wear out a set of tires can leave us with a pretty old spare with checked sidewalls etc.

Regarding switching sides in the rotation pattern - I wonder if a reason some manufacturers (Fuso for example) might suggest not switching sides might be that when moving a dual mounted rear tire to the front, the tire is rotated sideways if it remains on the same side of the vehicle, but not rotated sideways if moved to the other side. In other words if you "switch sides" with the wheel, the tire sees the same sides it did on the rear?

Howard
 

Peter_n_Margaret

Adventurer
It is said that radials prefer to rotate in the same direction all of their life.
My Michelins are directional too.
Swapping sides makes them rotate "backwards", unless you also flip them on the rim.
Cheers,
Peter
OKA196 motorhome
 

Davidl13

Adventurer
I have owned a couple of different earthroamers...and in my experience, not including depreciation, if you plan for $1/mile, you won’t be far off. there are many factors that influence this number...but that is a good rule of thumb. If you want to be safe, go to $2/ mile and you won’t be shocked.
 

gregmchugh

Observer
I have owned a couple of different earthroamers...and in my experience, not including depreciation, if you plan for $1/mile, you won’t be far off. there are many factors that influence this number...but that is a good rule of thumb. If you want to be safe, go to $2/ mile and you won’t be shocked.
What are the major factors besides fuel that get you to $1-2 per mile. Based on the first 33,000 miles on our Kenworth K370 I don’t think we are anywhere near that at this point but I haven’t really tried to calculate the cost per mile...
 

Davidl13

Adventurer
What are the major factors besides fuel that get you to $1-2 per mile. Based on the first 33,000 miles on our Kenworth K370 I don’t think we are anywhere near that at this point but I haven’t really tried to calculate the cost per mile...

Fuel, maintenance (current and future reserves) tires, repairs, insurance, cost of refreshing prep for resale, commission on sale of vehicle, depreciation, financing.. if I gave it serious thought I may end up higher.. fuel ($.50/mile +/-) is usually not the Lions share of costs.. it's just the one you notice everyday

Fuel costs vary regionally and over market conditions..maintenance depends on what kind of driving and driver... keeping a cost/mile maintenance reserve so you are prepared when the big dollar maintenance hits... if it doesn't hit, then it will in the next buyer and valued to compensate... insurance.. include extra costs Mexico travel?.. many factors can influence the per mile costs.. but it adds up fast... Try doing a cost analysis on a per mile basis... You will see.. it should be nothing to be shocked about... You have a $300-500k vehicle.. to be expected...

Airplanes are measured on these types of analysis.. operating cost per mile or per hour.. or annual given a certain number of hours per year... pilots are typically far better educated about planning..... research "cost of ownership of a single engine plane" You can get some good ideas on how to think about it from the aviation folks.. Conklin and decker have great data sheets

The more thorough your analysis, the higher the cost per mile... Sales guys and owners who don't want to scare future potential buyers and/or themselves, will typically leave out many hidden costs (such as the cost to sell, insure, store , repair etc..)... And put these costs into some other (non cost per mile) category. You can account for it now or later.. but in the end, the cost is the cost. Creative accounting can be.. well.. creative... But as an experienced owner.. I know better..
 
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