Operating cost of earthcruisers?

waveslider

Outdoorsman
One thing I can guarantee is that fuel isn't the big one. Rather it's depreciation.
But i saw a few earthcruisers selling for close to 250k after less than 80k miles which looks like it depreciates slower?
Don't confuse depreciation with book value/market value inconsistencies. Your depreciation would certainly be one of the largest expense line items since you would depreciate it with a normal curve that drops off heavily the first couple of years.

However, in many cases, mostly due to the thin used market, these vehicles hold their market value high above their book value (book value being the price you paid minus the depreciation expense). As you observed with the EC for sale.

You will find it similar with used rigs from many other reputable companies (and some other non-reputable van manufacturers with a three letter acronym that have a ridiculous and un-explainable waiting list that causes their used vehicles to go up in price).

This idea of referring to your overland adventure rig in the context of a business feels weird to me, and maybe even a little icky. And I know that wasn't the spirit of your question but in order to answer it you have to conflate some of the terms. I think the key point is that in terms of your "operating cost" of any rig you need to factor in the fact that the thing you bought at the beginning isn't going to be worth the same as the thing you sell in the end. So take what you think the difference is and divide it by the number of years you will have it, and there is your annual number for that operating expense line.

Now that I've written that, I think there might be a good way to talk about these things with business terms that would be useful on the other "Overpriced" thread in this sub-forum. Something about Fun and Adventure equating to cash flow, and things such as fuel, depreciation and repairs being the same as operating expense. And the quality of your vehicle dictating your operating leverage. Hmmm. I could get there.
 
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mrblah

Observer
This idea of referring to your overland adventure rig in the context of a business feels weird to me, and maybe even a little icky.
Didn'T aim tyo make you feel icky! ;)

It's just That when planning a long expedition like this, estimating the running cost of it before hand and planning to have that reserve in cash is a factor. I'm not retired yet but I don't want to wait (and roll the dice) to do the stuff I want to. But I still need to pay for it, hence the question about operating costs. Maybe I'm really not rich enough if I have to ask the question?

I'd approach any other project the same way. I know a year backpacking in SE Asia is about 35$ CAD per day including all flight costs and visas (considering friends experiences, online ressources and my guesstimation). I do project management for a living so maybe I approach this the same way I do work... probably why my lexical is too clinical for something so emotion for you waveslider! ;)
 

waveslider

Outdoorsman
In that case, you wouldn’t need to be bothered with depreciation because although its considered an operating expense, its a non-cash expense so for trip planning, you wouldn't need to include it in your budget normally.
 

rruff

Explorer
But i saw a few earthcruisers selling for close to 250k after less than 80k miles which looks like it depreciates slower?
I honestly don't know a lot about them, except that I did have them confused with Earthroamers (doh!). Earthcruisers are more practically priced. If they really hold value that well, then it's a testament to their design for sure.
 

mrblah

Observer
In that case, you wouldn’t need to be bothered with depreciation because although its considered an operating expense, its a non-cash expense so for trip planning, you wouldn't need to include it in your budget normally.
Exactly that's why I don't. I'm really interested in the "per mile" cost really.
 

Peter_n_Margaret

Adventurer
Costs of running an expensive vehicle also include insurance (possibly the largest of the 'fixed' cots) and that will vary significantly depending on its value and the level of cover you require.
Another question not yet asked is "where do you intend to go?" If the answer to that is "international" then you may find that getting comprehensive insurance is impossible in some places and you will need to consider covering the possible damage (including a total loss) yourself.

You may find some useful information here. ….. http://epicycles.com/

Cheers,
Peter
OKA196 motorhome
 
I’ve never had collision/comprehensive on any of my overseas trips and did away with it even for North America after the first year or 2 of $3000+ premiums. I never drive it at night. Did you know the accident rate is 4x at night? Probably worse in the 3rd world.
Another insurance ripoff is the 1% roro carriers want for sinking insurance. When was the last time a 100,000 ton cargo ship sank?
 
2010, container ship transporting all our worldly possessions when we repatriated back to USA from Tanzania sank in ship collision off India. Agent was very sorry, this almost never happens, which is true, But if we had not insured container we would’ve been screwed.
It all comes down to a roll of the dice, in my opinion, if you can’t afford to lose it insure it, If it doesn’t set you back terribly roll the dice with no insurance.
 
passenger/ro-ro cargo loss rate per thousand ships was 2.3

Ok this reference says loss rate is0.23%; therefore ~350% profit margin for insurance company.
 

Glenn C.

New member
My wife, Jeanne my dog, Mustard and I have put over 27,000 miles on our 2017 Earthcruiser EXP in just over a year. The cost to run is as follows, on highway we get 13.5-15 mpg,off road about 10mpg, (slightly lower in the winter because of the diesel heat) about 1000-1200 miles per jug of DEF ($14), service at a FUSO dealer every 5000 miles ranges from $250 to $400 (recommended 10,000 mile service interval, I half that) to include oil and filter, fuel filter (a fouled fuel filter will ruin your day, especially in the cold weather) turbo linkage lube and drive line lube. I do a 5 tire rotation every 5000 miles and have about 50% left on my TA KO2s, I expect to replace them in about 10-15,000 miles. We run our rig more in the winter more than in the summer (on a recent service I was told by Earthcruiser that our Webasto heater had 3x the hours of any other unit they have serviced) and have enjoyed it immensely and have been suprised by where it will fit (I have attached a parallel parking pick in Dayton OH for reference,both cars were there the arrived and left) both on and off road. Feel free to contact me with any questions, I am retired and have time to talk.
Happy Trails, Glenn C.
 

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Howard70

Adventurer
My wife, Jeanne my dog, Mustard and I have put over 27,000 miles on our 2017 Earthcruiser EXP in just over a year...5 tire rotation every 5000 miles and have about 50% left on my TA KO2s, I expect to replace them in about 10-15,000 miles....Glenn C.
Hello Glenn:

Great summary. That tire mileage seems spectacular. Are your rotating a spare or two into that mix?

Best Wishes,

Howard
 

Glenn C.

New member
Hello Glenn:

Great summary. That tire mileage seems spectacular. Are your rotating a spare or two into that mix?

Best Wishes,

Howard
Hello Howard, I have run a lot of highway miles and I run my tires hard 65 front 70 rear (I know it is 5psi above label but I like the contact pattern at full load) I do a 5 tire rotation. And I know EC just published recommendations that do not include the spare....I don't care.
Happy Trails, Glenn C.
 

waveslider

Outdoorsman
I'm betting that tire rotation method would be worth it's own thread. I rotated 5 tires with our SMB and then had a "tire guy" tell me not to. So I didn't with my next set and didn't see any difference. <shoulder shrug> Nice rig Glen.
 
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