No refrigeration needed

Photomike

White Turtle Adventures
For light weight and survives just about anything is Ichiban noodles, freeze dried vegies and if you can get a package of salad dressing (like the ones you get at a restaurant that you rip open . Add noodles (toss seasoning), vegies and 2 cups water to pot, let sit for 20 minutes, drain, add dressing. I like this as no refrigeration is needed. Great for hot or cold weather and you only need water with no heat to make.
 

herm

Adventurer
Most cheese and summer sausage keeps good in a ziplock for 4 or 5 days. we usually bring this for the first few days and eat all of it. We usually bring hot dogs or somthing similar and eat them on the first few days also.
Many of the foods we think of as refrigerator now were not in the past.
 

Black Dog

Makin' Beer.
With summer sausage you do have to be kind of careful. Most store bought summer sausage can go a while without being kept cool, but if you have all natural or home made foods they will spoil faster without all the preservatives and junk.
 

NuggetHoarder

Adventurer
I haven't tried this myself, but I have heard great things about Brinkmann's canned meats. The hamburger is supposedly very good and you can't tell it's canned. If anyone has tried this stuff, please speak up and give us a review.

http://brinkmanfarms.com/
 

rusty_tlc

Explorer
Taters
Beans
Onions
Salt Pork
Corn meal
Coffee
Sugar
Flour

Basically the stuff that won the west.:elkgrin:
 

djpandemic

New member
Nido

Nido is a powdered milk available in the international section of my local Ingles. I had tried other non-fat powdered milk in the past and it was awful but Nido retains the fats and when mixed with cold water is actually drinkable. This product is great for coffee and drinking as well as cold cereal and worth a try. Below is a link.

[ame="http://www.amazon.com/Nestle-Nido-Instant-Whole-12-6oz/dp/B00032B982"]http://www.amazon.com/Nestle-Nido-Instant-Whole-12-6oz/dp/B00032B982[/ame]
 

Herbie

Rendezvous Conspirator
This was the topic of a great class at Overland Expo, so I'm surprised to see nobody has mentioned some of the things covered in that class.

Grains are the most obvious. Rice was mentioned, but Quinoa, cracked wheat, etc. are also excellent, especially for a little "variety".

I saw instant-pasta's mentioned, but also consider some of the pasta styles that are naturally low-water and quick-cook like CousCous, etc.

The nice things about grains and pastas like this is that it's easy (and cheap) to buy semi-bulk and cook only what you need for the party, so no leftovers. Wife and I found that when cooked pilaf-style with veggies and an added protein (a la Ara's dishes at the OvEx11 class) 1 cup of rice/quinoa/etc. is more than enough for 2+1baby at home, so if I were cooking on-trail I'd only do 1/2 cup or 3/4 cup at most.

Harder to make those kinds of adjustments if cooking boxed foods, etc.
 

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Frankspinz

Adventurer
There are obviously few aussies here, because Vegemite hasn't been mentionned yet !
Of course, you need something suitable to spread it on ...

Seriously, I have some bread recipes... I pack all the ingredients (flour, yeast, sugar ...) in a large "Ziplock" (that will keep a while) ...

All is needed is: water, kneading and cooking in a pot or oven = delicious hot fresh bread !
 

INSAYN

Adventurer
There are obviously few aussies here, because Vegemite hasn't been mentionned yet !
Of course, you need something suitable to spread it on ...

Seriously, I have some bread recipes... I pack all the ingredients (flour, yeast, sugar ...) in a large "Ziplock" (that will keep a while) ...

At home I've been fiddling with making Bannock to experiment with various flavors. May have to incorporate this into my menu. :chef:
 
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Seiko

New member
Cured hams will last a long long time (six months to over a year) They will grow mold but you just cut that off and and use the good parts. Rather salty so you most likely will want to simmer it with beans and or rice.

I know people have said beef jerky, one great way to use it is to make it into a stew. Just put it in a pot with the veggies and water and it will turn soft again. One of my favorite meals when extended camping.

Also make your own jerky, hit up you tube for Alton Brown's way of doing it with the box fan.
 

Black Dog

Makin' Beer.
I know people have said beef jerky, one great way to use it is to make it into a stew. Just put it in a pot with the veggies and water and it will turn soft again. One of my favorite meals when extended camping.
I do that all the time out back packing. I make couscous but use just a tad bit extra water and toss in some shredded jerky and dried herbs. I want to get some dried veggies and throw them into the pot too, I've never tried that. Its even a nice meal to make at home if you don't feel like cooking very much and don't want to dirty up a bunch of dishes.
 

wjeeper

Active member
Looks like the few ideas I had are already taken, so nothing constructive to add:sombrero: I will definatly be keeping tabs on this thread as I prepare for my 2+ month trip this summer!
 

GPER

Observer
I haven't tried this myself, but I have heard great things about Brinkmann's canned meats. The hamburger is supposedly very good and you can't tell it's canned. If anyone has tried this stuff, please speak up and give us a review.

http://brinkmanfarms.com/
They are local and good stuff. GFS also has potato pearls, just add hot water and you have mashed potatoes.
 
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