Next generation snatch block

DaveInDenver

Expedition Leader
#10
After thinking about it, is it really any different than the rope rubbing against an aluminum fairlead during a sharp angle pull?
The rope isn't being wrapped around your hawse and being asked to deal with friction indefinitely. The rope isn't the problem, it's the soft shackle IMO. Does it get warm with an extend pull? You have to be concerned with melting synthetic rope and an axle doesn't seem like an ideal application for it. It's why bearings were invented in the first place.

This reminds me of the Petzl Ultralegere. If you're a climber you'll know you always carry one of those on your harness just in case but you wouldn't use it to replace your regular haul bag pulley. Climbing, really PPE in general, is more distinct about where knots are appropriate and where hardware is used.
 
Last edited:
#11
Well I hit some trails today and put the new snatch ring to the test.
We had a TJ drop the front wheels over a small embankment, about 2-1/2’ strait down. We used a JK Unlimited as the tow vehicle and attached the snatch ring to the TJ, it was a tough enough pull that the JK could not stay still until he dropped the front wheels over a berm to prevent sliding in order to retrieve the TJ. The winch was definitely slowing down due the drag of the TJ trying to get the front wheels to come straight up before it could back out of the embankment. Afterwards I inspected the Smittybilt soft shackle and ring and found no marks at all.

I have no doubt whatsoever about replacing my Warn steel snatch-block with the new aluminum ring.
 

Happy Joe

Apprentice Geezer
#12
Looks like its a roller to make a soft shackle into a snatch block.. not a stand alone snatch block... (find a friend with a lathe and have him turn you one)...
Or better yet make 2 one out of steel for steel cable and one out of aluminum for synthetic line.; if you want ball, roller bearings or a bronze bushing for a conventional steel shackle that too is easily do-able.

Whenever possible Make! ...Its good therapy, and stimulates the creative juices...

Enjoy!
 
Last edited:
#13
That's what I figured

Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-G930A using Tapatalk
Bend radius is too small for wire rope, and a large enough block would be difficult to get stiff wire rope to lay into correctly.

I emailed them a technical question about friction losses versus traditional snatch blocks.

Solid aluminum blocks are used in climbing, sailing, arborist work, etc, but normally for light duty/light load scenarios.

This is appealing for adding as a third or fourth block in my rig for the rare occasions I need that much redirection, but I don’t see it replacing my ARB9000s for primary use unless the friction numbers are really close or better (doubtful they could be).


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 
Top