Newer model FG (post 2010) owners - what spares do you carry?

Czechsix

Watching you from a ridge
Since yahoogroups is freaking impossible to use, I'll ask here instead :sombrero:

So - for those of you that have done extended trips, or even non-international travelers with FG's: What truck or camper related spares do you carry?

We've got an Alaska trip coming up in a 2012 model. Basic spares we'll carry will be the usual hoses, belts, possibly some hub components just in case. I'm also looking at carrying some sensors, maybe even harnesses that might be an issue, but I'm also going to check with a local factory mechanic to see what he suggests.

Then there are the questions on what failures, and common maintenance items one carries for the house side of things.

I normally carry a fairly comprehensive electrical repair kit, along with a regular assortment of tools for mechanical repair, plus medium duty truck specific stuff, like a larger torque wrench, torque multiplier for lug nuts, etc.

TIA for any thoughts and comments/ideas.
 

SkiFreak

Expedition Leader
Sounds like you plan on starting a dealership!
I think travel need to be broken into two scenarios; where there are easy to access dealerships and where there aren't. Basic things like belts and filters are a no brainer, but trying to cater for any possible scenario is overkill, in my opinion.
As an example... I have a suitable torque wrench for my truck, but I would not carry it with me on a trip. A length of square tube and a breaker bar are more versatile in my opinion and weigh a lot less.
 

Czechsix

Watching you from a ridge
Heck yeah as to the dealership!

Just wait till you see my prices in the middle of the tundra!

Seriously though, agreed as to access to dealers v no access. But also - what's easy access? Down the street? Within a hundred miles? How about a 300 mile tow from the middle of nowhere, that's coordinated either by ham radio, satphone, InReach texts, or?

Personally, I prefer having a decent assortment of fixin's on board. Nothing too heavy, but sensors, etc that are small, easy to store, unlimited shelf life, etc, sure. I'd be interested in having those on board. A $50 part that fails and is replaced on the trail is a far better idea than walking out, or trying to get a tow or good samaritan to do some running around for you. Been there, done that with Unimogs, and on those it wasn't unusual to carry some heavy spares.

Plenty of scenarios I can think of that can't be solved with any reasonable amount of supplies and tools that can be carried, but likewise plenty that can be solved with a comprehensive spares and tools kit.

Also a good idea to pay attention to that versatility issue!
 

fluffyprinceton

Adventurer
I'd put a Mut3 code reader & code delete tool right near the top. No Fuso experience past 08 but on mine the "RED" code can't be deleted with the cheap code readers, you need the full Mut3. Without the ability to delete "RED" codes the vehicle can go to limp mode or not run at all? (not sure about the engine not running at all as a result of codes triggered anybody with experience on that?). Without the full Mut3 you can't find out the specific issue well enough to make an intelligent decision about continuing to drive with "Yellow" or Red" engine check lights on. You have to drive/tow to a dealer to get the codes deleted...

My conclusion is I can find diesel mechanics & UPS/DHL/Fedex ships everywhere so having a Mut3 reader is essential for independence from the dealer network. Moe
 

pugslyyy

Expedition Vehicle Engineer Guy
I'd put a Mut3 code reader & code delete tool right near the top. No Fuso experience past 08 but on mine the "RED" code can't be deleted with the cheap code readers, you need the full Mut3. Without the ability to delete "RED" codes the vehicle can go to limp mode or not run at all? (not sure about the engine not running at all as a result of codes triggered anybody with experience on that?). Without the full Mut3 you can't find out the specific issue well enough to make an intelligent decision about continuing to drive with "Yellow" or Red" engine check lights on. You have to drive/tow to a dealer to get the codes deleted...

My conclusion is I can find diesel mechanics & UPS/DHL/Fedex ships everywhere so having a Mut3 reader is essential for independence from the dealer network. Moe
I'm pretty sure that the MUT-III only works through the 2010 model year (but could be mistaken) - I think you need XENTRY and/or MB Star. I'm sure there are clones available but it is not something I have looked at.

http://store.integron.com/fuso/category/55-diagnostic-kits.aspx
 

Czechsix

Watching you from a ridge
Fluffy: Yep, agreed as to having an onboard diagnostic system. Unfortunately, they're pricey no matter what.

Jon: Yah, I think we're all kinda using "MUT-III" as a generic term for the Fuso system. I've got an Integron xentry system sitting here, for inclusion on the rig when it's picked up.
 

pugslyyy

Expedition Vehicle Engineer Guy
wrt spares - some of the most useful stuff is wire, heat shrink, butt connectors, etc. Wires chafe / abrade / short / open due to the vibration. Also, I carry spare circuit boards for all the major camper systems (fridge, heater, water heater). 2 part epoxy putty can also be invaluable.
 

pugslyyy

Expedition Vehicle Engineer Guy
Anything to mechanically and electrically repair wires is good. I was doing a PM on my 2007 and noticed a frayed wire with only 2-3 strands still connected... very glad I found it before it broke completely. That was only the second friction/abrasion repair I have had to do on the chassis. It's just a fact of life that wires are going to abrade and potentially wear through in the conditions we operate under.

I've added several hundred feet of split loom, and add it everywhere I can - but it is usually the ends of the wire that break anyways.
 

gait

Explorer
consumable spares (belts, lights, filters, fluids, etc) only. Basic tools and small bits like electrical connectors, plumbing connectors, hose clips, nuts and bolts. Some redundancy of critical parts in house (like water pump). No insurance spares - for that I carry electronic manuals and at least have access to parts books through phone/sat phone for DHL delivery. These days information is king.
 

LeishaShannon

Adventurer
These days information is king.
Agreed. I have the basics onboard + a few electronic copies of the workshop manual on iPad and laptops. We bought the latest model mechanical truck we could find so it wouldn't have all the fancy sensors and electronics to go wrong. (The camper with its 100 odd wireless relays and sensors galore is another story... but none of that is critical to survival or being able to drive)

Sat phone + courier is our backup plan should something really bad happen - waiting for a few days on the side of the road with all the creature comforts isn't really the end of the world if you don't have a strict schedule.
 
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