Need help with brake line work

Photobug

Active member
Unrelated to expeditioning but need help and this is the first place I can think of to get advice on trailer brake repair.

I am swapping out my coupler on my sailboat. It is a surge brake coupler that was corroded and beyond use. Things were going too well, in that none of the bolts I had to remove were frozen. Then the brake line attached to the old coupler was too long and was zig zagged to be attached to the old coupler.

I am over a half hour from the nearest auto parts store. I want to make sure I have the right tools and parts to do this right tomorrow. I will also have to bleed the system. Any clues to make this go right will be appreciated.
 

Verkstad

Raggarkung
Not exactly sure what you are asking...
But strongly suggest if you dont already have is appropriate size tubing wrenches. Perhaps crushwashers if your master cylinder connects with banjofittings.
But in a pinch its pretty safe to anneal then sandpaper them flat to reuse them.
 

Photobug

Active member
I will likely buy the appropriate wrenches and fittings in the morning to make this work. I tend to drive slow and conservative when towing 5000 lbs of boat but want to know my breaks are working. I live at 6000 ft and am often driving over high passes. I may also just drive the boat down the short steep hill where it is stored and put the boat in the water so I can take the trailer to be worked on by someone with the right tools.
 

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Buffalobwana

Observer
That’s a good idea. Ditch the boat, go to the auto parts store that has a sign that says “no working on cars in the parking lot.“ Park trailer beside the dude working on his car and fix it there.
 

Photobug

Active member
That’s a good idea. Ditch the boat, go to the auto parts store that has a sign that says “no working on cars in the parking lot.“ Park trailer beside the dude working on his car and fix it there.
This is a different part of the world. No such sigms exist. You might even get the parts guy come out to the parking lot and help.
 

old_CWO

Active member
Tubing cutter and double flaring tool to neaten up that brake line?

You might want to check out the brakes lines if they are steel. Since the surge coupler was corroded I would be suspicious of the hard lines as well.
 

Photobug

Active member
Thanks for the suggestions. I was kind of in a jam. I had the mast up on the sailboat and it was our home for the next two nights and wanted to get it down to the water. I just removed the brake line installed the coupler and used 1st gear to keep the truck in check going down to the ramp.

I was able to remove a section of the brake line because there was a joint near the front. I have it at home and will buy the tools and fixtures next time I return to the boat and also do the hubs/bearings when the boat is in the water again.
 
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