Mustang as an overlander?

Korben

Adventurer
Lol the plan is to go hard, atv trails, off camber, rutted and washed out trails, water crossing, rock crawling etc, I will use speed and momentum for the more difficult spots!! And get dragged out when I'm stuck ********, the more I think about it the more excited I get, I'm laughing my *** off thinking about how much fun I'm gonna have.
I'm disappointed thinking it's more likely then not that your going to end up having to abandon the car. I don't care much about you or the car, I care about where you'll be abandoning it and how that makes the rest of us who appreciate the outdoors and what's left of the open trails look.
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Want to explore some forest roads, sure, I've done that in a car, have fun. But be safe, my father hit some kid speeding around on those roads head on once, wasn't pretty. My dad was fine, barely bent the bumper, the other guy went down an embankment with his engine was in his lap. But want to go all gung ho crazy trying to right foot your way through something you have no business on, please don't. We spend weekends out in these trails pulling out all the trash and abandoned cars to keep them open. You coming here laughing about smashing everything up until you get into a spot that you can't recover from is, well I'll stop, PG forum.
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Edit..
On the flip side I've had this nutty idea for a while I think is completely doable but I'll never have time to do it. Buy an old v8 explorer pop off the body and put a mustang body on it. Frame issues of course, would take some work, but I took a close look once, wouldn't be too bad. I was thinking more like 67 Mustang though, likely do it using repopped body parts vs. an original and just build it around the frame and a cage.
 
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Shovel

Dreaming Ape
Being serious for OP, there are thousands of miles of dirt roads you can explore in a 2wd vehicle like your Mustang with reasonable safety and with reasonable respect for the land we share. Nobody became an expert overnight and I did my share of mucking about in whatever car I had available. I got stuck, I walked home a lot, I called upon friends late at night, I got used to asking strangers for help, I was a little jack*** and I learned a lot.

The old saying "As slow as possible, as fast as necessary" will be your friend; do not count on momentum to save you. Momentum is very, very hard on vehicles. P-rated (regular car) tires are very thin, optimized for comfort and quietness and fuel efficiency - they cut very easily on sharp rocks.

This is an extremely dry boring video but so far I have yet to find a more informative video lesson in correct, sustainable off-pavement driving technique and other than the Rover-specific bits, the techniques work the same in underbuilt vehicles as they do in full off-road rigs. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RX_pitfXYjQ

Might be worth rebuilding your limited slip with new friction material before you head out... parts aren't terribly expensive on ebay and rebuilding a diff is good knowledge to earn.
 

underdrive

jackwagon
This thread is some kind of special.
Seems to me the OP is some kind of special too... Especially with attitude like the quite below:

Lol the plan is to go hard, atv trails, off camber, rutted and washed out trails, water crossing, rock crawling etc, I will use speed and momentum for the more difficult spots!! And get dragged out when I'm stuck ********, the more I think about it the more excited I get, I'm laughing my *** off thinking about how much fun I'm gonna have.
Now what I think they doesn't realize is that yes their 4x4 truck buddy will likely have their back and drag their sorry butt out, once. And that will be the end of any and all recovery assistance from that person. I've dealt with that mess, someone gets in way over their head and then calls for rescue and expects us to drop everything and go help them out. Which admittedly is often doable, but not always. And when you do get there and see the mess, you realize if there's even a remote hope for saving their vehicle you need to be extra extra careful in how you do things. And so you end up burning up most of your day on that job, and despite your best efforts something ends up damaged anyways. And here's where things get interesting - a friend who admits they screwed up bad but is just thankful for your assistance despite the damages is someone I will go and bail out times and again, rain or shine. On the other hand someone who starts whining about how they weren't stuck so bad, and how you were too rough and broke their vehicle, and so on and so forth - them folks get the proverbial finger, I collect all my gear and I'm headed back, they can hitch a ride with me or they can stay with their vehicle and either try to get it out on their own or look for someone else who'd be willing to give it a shot. I can't help but wonder which of the two scenarios would play out with the OP and their Mustang...
 

Shovel

Dreaming Ape
Seems to me the OP is some kind of special too... Especially with attitude like the quite below:
Agreed... I figure a Mustang (about whose paint one doesn't care much....) can go to a ton of beautiful places like Organ Pipe Cactus National Monument which has graded roads like this


and Cottonwood Cyn. Road in Utah, - easy graded road in fair weather, I've seen every kind of sedan driving that road without any special effort by the drivers


But stuff like

atv trails, off camber, rutted and washed out trails, water crossing, rock crawling etc
is going to have a very short career and not leave anything or anybody improved for it. Touring isn't a yeehaw sport.
 

underdrive

jackwagon
is going to have a very short career and not leave anything or anybody improved for it. Touring isn't a yeehaw sport.
To heck with his vehicle's career, that's on him and his judgement (or lack thereof). What is concerning about his ideas is the impact he'll be having on wherever he tries to pull those stunts - Korben hit the nail on the head there, it's very easy for the OP to think how they will tackle some obstacle or whatever, but what about the folks behind them? They gotta deal with the mess the OP made, and if they get to stop and clean up after the OP they won't be very appreciative...

And yes, there are so many great places in this country one can visit without ever leaving graded roads, I fail to see what the appeal is in destroying one's vehicle in terrain that it was clearly not meant to traverse. Especially if that is one's only vehicle, as is the case with the OP. But then again, it's vehicle that was apparently given to them, not something they actually bought, so maybe that has something to do with it?
 

Mrmoustache

New member
So many assumptions and judgements being made by know it all's on here. Why are you so sure I'm leaving a mess on trails? I'll have you know I carry a spill kit, and pick up ALL debris left behind. I've been out twice already on easy dirt trails and yes I got stuck, yes I made it out both times with minimal damage. Dented both rockers and cracked the front bumper. I had a lot of fun and left no junk on the trail. Newsflash, you don't know everything.
 

Eaglefreek

Eagleless
When I was in high school, I had a 68 Dodge Coronet. I took that thing places a car shouldn't have gone. However it was a full frame vehicle. Your rusted unibody vehicle, might not last very long.
 
I think soft roading is the operative term here. I had a 1979 Mustang that I took all over Arizona, Utah and Wyoming when I was the OP's age. I was at the Grand Canyon North Rim when I was approached by someone who needed a ride to push or jump start his truck. I was available to help and it was on a seldom used fire road just outside the park. It was a rough road and I had to take some detours to get around swampy sections and fallen trees. I was able to get within 50 yards of him before I did not want to continue any further. So, it is doable, but that said, the Mustang did not live beyond 130,000 miles.
 

Binksman

Observer
I had a lowered 2wd Chevy truck that I took everywhere possible when I out of high school. Be courteous, take friends who can pull you out, and a the good sense to learn some recovery technique before you head out.

I'm not sure if anyone posted this either. Despite the manufactured drama, they still drove the cars on those trails...
 

underdrive

jackwagon
So many assumptions and judgements being made by know it all's on here. Why are you so sure I'm leaving a mess on trails? I'll have you know I carry a spill kit, and pick up ALL debris left behind. I've been out twice already on easy dirt trails and yes I got stuck, yes I made it out both times with minimal damage. Dented both rockers and cracked the front bumper. I had a lot of fun and left no junk on the trail. Newsflash, you don't know everything.
It's based on experience with others who have shown attitude similar to yours. When people do stupid things, screw up, then bail and leave others to sort out the mess, it tends to leave said others a bit bitter about the whole ordeal. Good to hear you're owning up to your mistakes though, hopefully you can soon upgrade from the Mustang to something more capable that leaves less debris for you to pick up - if you think you're having fun now just wait till you no longer have to worry about shearing the oil plug off the engine pan and stuff like that.
 

Retired Tanker

Adventurer
I had a lowered 2wd Chevy truck that I took everywhere possible when I out of high school. Be courteous, take friends who can pull you out, and a the good sense to learn some recovery technique before you head out.

I'm not sure if anyone posted this either. Despite the manufactured drama, they still drove the cars on those trails...

Spoiler alert: He nails the Bouncy Castle!!
 
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