Mr heater buddy heaters in tents overnight

cr500taco

Adventurer
I recently bought and this last weekend used the Big Buddy heater in my Cabela's Alaskan Guide tent. I read in the instructions that it's not recommened to run it while sleeping, just incase it tips over So, I only turned it on right before bed time to warm up the tent before we went to sleep to change and after I woke up to change. My girlfriend said she wished we can run it all night. Just wondering if anyone does run it all night?
 
I recently bought and this last weekend used the Big Buddy heater in my Cabela's Alaskan Guide tent. I read in the instructions that it's not recommened to run it while sleeping, just incase it tips over So, I only turned it on right before bed time to warm up the tent before we went to sleep to change and after I woke up to change. My girlfriend said she wished we can run it all night. Just wondering if anyone does run it all night?
I do all the time, but just take into account that nothing flamable is nearby. i place on the ground on an old metal cookie sheet and I vent my ground tent on the bottom and at the top.

I also have a battery operated CO2 alarm, overkill, but helps me sleep easy.

I also connect to a larger propane cylinder so I don't have to wake up every 4-5 hours to change out a 1 pounder.



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Herbie

Rendezvous Conspirator
Ack. This terrifies me.

You're burning the same O2 you're breathing. You're basically relying on a $0.05 part to save you from carbon monoxide poisoning*. Yes, you can get away with it 99 times. Until you don't, then you're dead.


*CO detectors are a very simple electric circuit that use one of a couple varieties of simple sensors that change electrical resistance in the presence of some amount of CO. When that resistance changes, it should trip the alarm. Should. Assuming that every other nickel electrical component in the board, all sourced from China, were all built to spec and don't fail.
 

Corey

OverCamping Specialist
I follow Jason on YouTube who camps and sleeps in his roof top tent with his two dogs.
He just posted this the other day.
I have the dame Buddy heater, but have never used it camping, it is more for if the electricity goes off during the winter, and I have used it for that before.

 

Happy Joe

Apprentice Geezer
Have tried many heaters (got quite a collection), most non thermostatic propane heaters (i.e. Mr. Heater Buddy heaters) use too much propane, even using bulk tanks, IMO.
Non vented heaters, including Buddy heaters, in waterproof tents (i.e. Cabala's Alaknak) can also emit so much water that waking with a cold rain on your face at O-dark-thirty may be a bit of a (unpleasant) surprise.
In spite of it all one of the Buddy heaters would likely be the heater I take if I ever again camp where a heater is needed for more than getting in and out of the sleeping bag... because of its carry handle.
Personally I find that having a good sleeping bag is better than using a heater, 'though everyone is different and should use what works best for them.

Note; I try to maintain at minimum of two 16 square inch vents (one high and one low) when using oxygen consuming devices in a tent... this will vary depending on your heater/device; always use adequate venting!
Also Note; that the "oxygen sensor" system on the buddy heaters and others are sometime finicky at higher altitudes causing the heater not to work/light, or to go out; even with very good ventilation.

Enjoy!
 
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brentbba

Explorer
Good tips in the video. I don't run my Mr. Buddy all night. A small propane canister won't last that long as I did try an all nighter once! I've always just used it to heat the tent before bedtime and again in the morning to take the chill out of the tent. I haven't used it in my new RTT, but did in my old Eezi-Awn Globetrotter. Nice thing about the Globetrotter is that the heater was on the ground and away from the tent or anything flammable! Not sure about using it in the RTT tho!
 

ClovisMan

Observer
Ack. This terrifies me.

You're burning the same O2 you're breathing. You're basically relying on a $0.05 part to save you from carbon monoxide poisoning*. Yes, you can get away with it 99 times. Until you don't, then you're dead.


*CO detectors are a very simple electric circuit that use one of a couple varieties of simple sensors that change electrical resistance in the presence of some amount of CO. When that resistance changes, it should trip the alarm. Should. Assuming that every other nickel electrical component in the board, all sourced from China, were all built to spec and don't fail.
We all can't live forever. :)

Get 3 CO2 monitors. Then, when you are talking to Saint Pete he can't say you didn't try...
 

Outside somewhere

Irritating sod
Never had an issue using a buddy heater but I also always use my annex. Since it has flaps on either side I leave both slightly cracked for ventilation and I use a battery powered fan up top to circulate the air. Zero issues. Guess I'd rather be a nice warm corpse than a cranky cold SOB the next morn.

Also I mitigate any of the effects of propane giving off moisture several ways. I have two rechargeable dehumidifiers (IIRC evadry is the brand?) After a trip or when "full" you can plug them in at home to a 110 outlet and it recharges the particles inside. I hang them inside the tent so the air circulates around them day and night. I also use moisture elimination pouches (same evadry company?) I toss two three between the mattress and base material of the RTT between the gaps of the camping air mattress pads I use. I leave two or three of these in the tent when not in use as they are good for 30 days or so to work when the tent isn't in use. I figure I've eliminated 85% of the interior moisture that comes with a heater, respiration, temp changes outside which works for me.
 

MANUCHAO

Aventurero
Non vented heaters, including Buddy heaters, in waterproof tents (i.e. Cabala's Alaknak) can also emit so much water that waking with a cold rain on your face at O-dark-thirty may be a bit of a (unpleasant) surprise.


Enjoy!
Ack. This terrifies me.

You're burning the same O2 you're breathing. You're basically relying on a $0.05 part to save you from carbon monoxide poisoning*. Yes, you can get away with it 99 times. Until you don't, then you're dead.
You would be better off with a really good down sleeping bag....
For the times when I gots my 2 y/o and a heater is a must I use this.....

Its awesome and keeps things dry....

 

dcoy

Adventurer
You would be better off with a really good down sleeping bag....
For the times when I gots my 2 y/o and a heater is a must I use this.....

Its awesome and keeps things dry....

I agree. It is pricey (but you can save like I did with the DIY model) but safe and does the job. Despite the sleeping bag truth, my wife won't camp without it in anything but the most temperate conditions. Works for RTT, ground tent, and probably could fire it up at home for power outages as well. (I like how you painted it to match your rig. I kept mine in plain aluminium)
 

MANUCHAO

Aventurero
Yeah i bought mine second hand... at less than half price... it came with the old & new style box ... PC the new box and sold the old box...

:beer::beer::beer:
 

BigSwede

The Credible Hulk
We all can't live forever. :)

Get 3 CO2 monitors. Then, when you are talking to Saint Pete he can't say you didn't try...
CO2 is carbon dioxide, and is not particularly harmful. CO carbon monoxide is another story.

I would rather rely on a proper sleeping bag than risk death by CO.
 

Dozer Dan

Observer
Something burning inside the tent really scares the sh*t out of me.
Add insulation to the tent. Add layers, extra blankets, more insulation under.
I use an electric blanket in my rtt - uses very little power but makes a huge difference.
 
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