Mod priorities

Fritzoc

Observer
Hello Everyone,
I've been combing all the forums, and I attended Expo East (amazing!). I seem to be more indecisive than ever on the order in which to make mods to my 14 JKU sport.
I'm not a rock crawler or mud seeker. Building the jeep for car camping and remote trips/camping. Likely nothing longer than a week to ten days in the back country.
We live in Louisville, KY.
It's also my daily driver.
I have an ARB front bumper,warn winch and Rubicon rock sliders.
I'll be getting all the requisite recovery gear I don't have- hi lift, snatch block, etc, so that's not part of my mod list. Same goes for tools and first aid. Have all of that.
Future mods may include:
Tires- currently running the stock sport all seasons (considering Cooper s/t maxx or duratrac- plan to get pizza cutters 33")
Rear ARB bumper (more hi-lift friendly)
CB radio
Aux lights
Roof rack( have a line on a used gobi stealth with two ladders for $1100- seems a bit high, thoughts?)
RTT - I have a great, and big ground tent, but I'm a sucker for cool gear
Rear organization- plan to fab a shelf and sliding floor in rear that still allows access to under floor storage
Small lift - all the extra weight is/will play havoc with the stock suspension. Front already noticeably sagging. (AEV 2.5 or OME 2"). Maybe just stiffer springs and more robust shocks. Don't want to compromise center of gravity too much, especially if I get the rack and RTT.
Water and fuel storage. - likely Gerry cans mounted on the rear- not on the rack.
Armor- replace and add to the underbelly armor. Your thoughts here are especially appreciated.
I realize these are all quite standard mods in "our" world. Just really struggling on where to begin. I keep circling back to the tires as #1, and then second guessing.
I look forward to your comments and advice.
Thanks so much. Love this forum.
Picture from Expo East is before I added the Rubicon rock rails.

ImageUploadedByTapatalk1413890516.955760.jpg
 
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lysol

Explorer
With added electronics, one could really benefit for a clean switch system. You could build your own or purchase one like the sPod. I would prefer to build my own though as I could maintain it myself should something break.
 

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FastGlass

Adventurer
What you're describing is almost identical to the reasons for my own upcoming build, but In addition, I'll be taking multiple 1-2 week photography based trips though the back country and "ancient" roads of VT and New England and wheeling it a lil every year...
That being said, I might suggest you invest based on projected use. You may not need 1/4" steel underbody armor, but you should consider evap and LCA skids, better oil pan coverage might be practical as well. Strengthen the axles with some welded c gussets and get that rear bumper...winch too if you want it. After you put all that weight on, THEN take a look at the lift that has the right spring/shock combo to give you the lowest lift you need to be able to do the stuff you'd like to do. You can get carried away very easily (I already have, and my new JKUR isn't even HERE yet!:)...get the basics that'll get you into and out of the places you want to go, and invest in great recovery gear, and learn how to use it...then wheel it and go from there, IMHO...
 
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rlynch356

Defyota
My 15 build is following what i do currently.
Lights (headlights/interior)
arb sliders to provide rocker protection
Interior storage organization (Front runner is what i am thinking) for camping gear - this will be a multi purpose setup so i can set it up also to dive out of.

I'll do a bar/winch and rear + suspension and tires after the above.

then i'll buy an expo trailer :) for anything else.
 

Hilldweller

SE Expedition Society
Look at the LoD roof rack; it's pretty slick.
And I really like my ST-Maxx 255/80-17s on my Sport.

Welcome aboard. Holler if you get down to GA.

Here's my ensemble, btw, including wife and dog:

 

FastGlass

Adventurer
Thanks. Where in vt will u be going? From there- sort of. Best place on earth.
North of St Johnsbury...Willoughby S.F. Area. Anywhere between 114 and 91. Really, anywhere from Champlain to the Lakes region of NH. Hiked the Long Trail years ago and sectioned parts of the AT from MA through ME and fell in love with that area. Looking to put together some sort of "off (paved) road interstate" itinerary that takes me from/near Burlington to the lakes region via fire roads and the local ancients...
 

WrenchMonkey

Mechanical Animal
Skip the hilift and get a cheap HF aluminum floor jack. Add a chunk of 2x10 for soft ground.
.
Besides being dangerous and heavy, the hilift will struggle to lift the body high enough to max out the suspension and lift the tire. I once had to resort to digging a hole under the jeep to get the tire back on.
.
Robert
 

mikeJKUR

Adventurer
I looked over your list and agree a rear bumper with hi-lift jacking points is a must. A great feature when you need it the most. I am in the process of looking at rear bumpers. For me it is between ARB ot JCR. Both have jack lifting points.
As for an engine skid, take a look TJM. The engine skid plate is only 3mm so this would not be for someone that is hadcore but half the price of other steel skid plates and around the same weight as aluminum plates this might work for you. Could save you make and weight.
 

twiisted71

Adventurer
Skip the hilift and get a cheap HF aluminum floor jack. Add a chunk of 2x10 for soft ground.
.
Besides being dangerous and heavy, the hilift will struggle to lift the body high enough to max out the suspension and lift the tire. I once had to resort to digging a hole under the jeep to get the tire back on.
.
Robert

A ratchet strap around the axle and over the frame will greatly help with the ease of using a Hi-lift. You can even use a piece of heavy rope or chain. If you get a flat in a muddy spot that floor jack is really going to suck trying to get into place--if even possible and the jeep isn't sitting too low for it to get under the axle. It sure doesn't have the range to lift the body enough to clear a tire in these conditions. A hi-lift isn't intended for a mall crawler.
 

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WrenchMonkey

Mechanical Animal
A ratchet strap around the axle and over the frame will greatly help with the ease of using a Hi-lift. You can even use a piece of heavy rope or chain...
I've heard that plan, and I guess it might work, but it sounds like a pain in the butt.

If you get a flat in a muddy spot that floor jack is really going to suck trying to get into place...
Easier than crawling under to hook up a limit strap, at least the jack has a handle you can push with. :D

And if the ground is so soft the rig is sunk to the axles, you're never going to jack it up anyway, and shouldn't try. You've got to get it on firmer ground. Then the floor jack only needs a 3" space to lift.

A hi-lift isn't intended for a mall crawler.
We can agree to disagree. I've seen lots of them bolted to street-bound showboats. In the woods, everybody I wheel with seems to agree that you need to lift from the axle.
.
But hey, your mileage may vary...
 
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