Military trailer overland budget build

4lowdean

Observer
Looks like an M116A2 generator trailer. Great foundation. I have an M101A2 and an M116A3 flat-deck. Had an M116A2 generator trailer that I ended up selling to a friend and we dropped an M101A3 tub on it.
 

sipaez

New member
1585235033125.png

This is more or less what I want to build.
Does anyone know where I can get an axle for it? I want to have Toyota wheels to match my truck!
 

sipaez

New member
Purely from a visual perspective, you might find yourself with a low tongue weight problem. I would suggest that you think about weight placement before you start building.
Good observation!
The frame on the trailer is 8ft and I don't really want to build something that big. So I thought I could have a space for cargo in the front, for bikes or other toys.
Do you know if there is a way to calculate this?
1585259318416.png
 

LikeABoss

Observer
You could think about hanging those lightweight bikes off the back and having water, fuel, cooler, etc up front. Plan other heavy storage to the front or over the axle.

Also, you can buy a tongue scale from etrailer (or various methods with a bathroom scale).
 

quickfarms

Adventurer
The center of the load, weight, needs to be forward of the axle.

If you measure the trailer you will find that the axle is set back about 6” or more.

You want to have about 10% of the trailer weight on the tongue
 

sipaez

New member
So i finally decided to just build something really simple on top of the frame. I just don't really know if this setup is going to even work for us, so I'm calling it Box on wheels 1.0.

20200817_183824.jpg

My idea is to paint the plywood with bedliner and hope it doesn't deteriorate too fast.
 

old_CWO

Well-known member
It will deteriorate fast if left outside. Plywood, especially fir which I think that is will "check" in the weather and the bedliner will crack and chip right along with it. A coat of epoxy and some mat will slow down or even eliminate the checking, but requires a top coat for UV protection. Since this is basically a prototype, I would just paint it with several coats of oil based enamel like Rustoleum or Ace Rust Stop. Alternatively a good couple coats of oil based exterior house primer topped with exterior latex will last surprisingly long.

No sense in spending a bunch of money on expensive materials that may not stay in service.
 

sipaez

New member
It will deteriorate fast if left outside. Plywood, especially fir which I think that is will "check" in the weather and the bedliner will crack and chip right along with it. A coat of epoxy and some mat will slow down or even eliminate the checking, but requires a top coat for UV protection. Since this is basically a prototype, I would just paint it with several coats of oil based enamel like Rustoleum or Ace Rust Stop. Alternatively a good couple coats of oil based exterior house primer topped with exterior latex will last surprisingly long.

No sense in spending a bunch of money on expensive materials that may not stay in service.

I have aluminium sheet from another project, I wonder if I should use it for the top? (I don't have enough for all of it. )
 

high-and-dry

Active member
I have aluminium sheet from another project, I wonder if I should use it for the top? (I don't have enough for all of it. )
You need to go over tnttt.com there is a skinning secrets forum that will answer all the skin questions you have and give you even more to ask. Lots of people over there have done aluminum, there are issues that you need to be ready for, like it oil canning.

Yes bedliner over plywood has been shown to fail very quickly. But believe it or not canvas that is put on with tight bond glue, then painted holds up very well.
 

sipaez

New member
You need to go over tnttt.com there is a skinning secrets forum that will answer all the skin questions you have and give you even more to ask. Lots of people over there have done aluminum, there are issues that you need to be ready for, like it oil canning.

Yes bedliner over plywood has been shown to fail very quickly. But believe it or not canvas that is put on with tight bond glue, then painted holds up very well.
Thank you for the tip! I might go with the PMF (Poor man's fiberglass). It's perfect for what I'm doing!
 
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