Midwest Rust Blues

Salonika

Monterror Pilot
Well I finally decided to finish replacing my rusted fuel lines. A couple years ago I switched over to nylon line from the fuel pump forward about two feet then kept the steel the rest of the way forward. It was finally starting to get very questionable. Check out my old fuel filter neighborhood. People out west unfortunately don’t get to enjoy these projects! If my Montero were an airplane I would have been grounded 10 years ago. I’ll post the after photos later. Amazingly the two bolts on the filter bracket came right off without even using any spray. I’m switching to Dorman quick disconnects. Can’t wait to get this done.

Side note, for a vehicle with serious off road and racing roots, I never understood why it appears zero effort was expended to protect the fuel filter. It’s hanging right out in the open really, even a piece of highway debris could take it out.
 

Attachments

Last edited:

Recommended books for Overlanding

Overlanding the Americas: La Lucha
by Mr Graeme Robert Bell
From $20
The Essential Guide to Overland Travel in the United Stat...
by TeriAnn Wakeman
From $64.95
Crossing the Congo: Over Land and Water in a Hard Place
by Mike Martin, Chloe Baker, Charlie Hatch-Barnwell
From $25.95
Tortillas to Totems (Every day an Adventure Book 4)
by Sam Manicom
From $9.99

Salonika

Monterror Pilot
Here’s the new setup with aftermarket WIX filter and Dorman quick disconnects. I now have nylon from the fuel pump all the way to where the steel lines come down from the engine bay under the truck. They weren’t rusty up there so I kept the steel in the engine bay.

The filter bracket is being painted so that will be installed soon.
 

Attachments

Salonika

Monterror Pilot
All done! Glad to say goodbye to rusty fuel lines. Now I can change a fuel filter in about 2 minutes instead of an hour. Anybody else using these quick connects? If you are joining nylon to nylon you don’t even need compression fittings anymore. Just cut the nylon clean and press it in. They are almost too good to be true. After doing some research I found out many manufacturers have already been using nylon fuel line for a couple decades
 

Attachments

Last edited:

b dkw1

Observer
All done! Glad to say goodbye to rusty fuel lines. Now I can change a fuel filter in about 2 minutes instead of an hour. Anybody else using these quick connects? If you are joining nylon to nylon you don’t even need compression fittings anymore. Just cut the nylon clean and press it in. They are almost too good to be true. After doing some research I found out many manufacturers have already been using nylon fuel line for a couple decades
Are those just regular push locks or something else?
 

evomaki

Observer
This needs some more details/part numbers. That nylon line goes all the way back to the fuel tank? What is the size. Tell us about the nylon to existing Montero rigid line connection.
 

Recommended books for Overlanding

Americas Overland - The Driving Handbook
by Donald Greene
From $20
Overlanding the Americas: La Lucha
by Mr Graeme Robert Bell
From $20
Deep Survival: Who Lives, Who Dies, and Why
by Laurence Gonzales
From $9.99

Salonika

Monterror Pilot
This needs some more details/part numbers. That nylon line goes all the way back to the fuel tank? What is the size. Tell us about the nylon to existing Montero rigid line connection.
See: “What did you do to your Mitsubishi today” thread, my post #620 you’ll see the photo. Steel to nylon compression fitting, then yes all nylon forward to just below engine bay where again I have nylon to steel compression to change back to steel.
 

Salonika

Monterror Pilot
Also, the fittings are made by a company named SUR&R, and the nylon to nylon fittings are made by Dorman. I got both at my local auto parts shop. Both though are of course available on Amazon. I converted my return line to 5/16 at the pump so that everything was the same size hardware, but I converted the return line back to 1/4" at the engine bay because none of that steel was rusty. You don't technically need compression fittings on the return line since it is quite low pressure, if you've noticed, even Mitsu just used rubber hose with hose clamps in a few places along the return line route. I just happened to use a compression fitting on the fuel pump for the return because I didn't want to worry about that spot since it is harder to access if there were a leak.
 
Last edited:
Top