Material for shelters

Cypher

Overlander
I would say it depends on your situation. I have two survival kits, one small and one large. The small one fits in a zip-lock bag has a single plastic rain poncho that is pretty good size when you open it up. It can be used as it was intended or as a roof on a shelter that you build. My large kit is basically a backpack that I have an emergency tent in exactly like this one: http://www.campmor.com/outdoor/gear/Product___23006

I also have some emergency blankets in both kits (one in the small and several in the large kit) that can also be used for shelter, plus they are super cheap:
http://www.survivorind.com/thermal-emergency-blanket.html

I also carry a large garbage bag in my large kit, just another item that can be used for shelter. Again it all depends on your situation. The items above are very small and easy to carry as described. You may need to build a shelter out of available materials in the middle of the woods one day. You never know, but these will definitely help out if you are lucky enough to have them.
 

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kellymoe

Expedition Leader
I keep a roll of this stuff in each of my packs for climbing and skiing. http://www2.dupont.com/Tyvek/en_US/index.html

It's almost weightless and protects against rain and wind, makes a good ground cloth too. My dad was doing some work on his home and he had a bunch left over. It has come in handy on several occasions. I used it last year during a week long backpack trip in the Sierra Nevada. The only drawback is that it is a little noisy. Don't know what the cost is but if you can get your hands on some it makes a great material for shelter.
 

DarkHelmet

Adventurer
I carry a couple items.

Some 550 chord and one of these blankets makes a good impromptu lean-to. Folded up it serves as an insulated mat for sitting on. It can also be used as an outer protective layer to wrap a patient when in a litter and keep sleeping bags dry. There are many uses and I have been very happy with this item. Price is cheap enough to almost make them disposable.

http://www.rei.com/product/407106

I also carry one of these: http://www.rei.com/product/750938

Looks like this one gets a better customer rating though: http://www.rei.com/product/750944

- DH
 

Cypher

Overlander
That Space Emergency Blanket is a great find! I might pick up one of those, I mean why not for that price.
 

verdesardog

Explorer
tyvek, washed without soap a couple of times to soften it up. 6x9 with installed gromets every 12". Of course always have at least 50' of 550 cord too!

Very strong, water and wind proof, light weight.
 

Pat Caulfield

New member
Tyvek. You can gather the material around a small stone in the corners and loop the paracord around it, if you don't have grommets or don't want to punch holes (which will tear out) for any tie down lines. 3 mil drop cloth material also works well, is cheap and light.
 

Arclight

SAR guy
I keep a roll of this stuff in each of my packs for climbing and skiing. http://www2.dupont.com/Tyvek/en_US/index.html

It's almost weightless and protects against rain and wind, makes a good ground cloth too. My dad was doing some work on his home and he had a bunch left over. It has come in handy on several occasions. I used it last year during a week long backpack trip in the Sierra Nevada. The only drawback is that it is a little noisy. Don't know what the cost is but if you can get your hands on some it makes a great material for shelter.
Another recommendation on the Tyvek house wrap. You can usually get a scrap of it from a construction site for free or cheap. It's waterproof and very light. You can also sew it on a home sewing machine.

Arclight
 

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silvElise

Adventurer
Always have ample paracord around and some trusty sharp edges with a solar blanket.. The rest is up to bushcrafting whats around.
 
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