M1101 1102 thread for conversion to 12V and matching Land Cruiser spares

JamesC

Adventurer
Agreed with above except and we started the process with a rubber deadblow hammer - hitting the cap at a downward and outward angle. Wasn't too concerned since converted the entire hub including new grease-able caps.
 

MtnBubba

Observer
Agreed with above except and we started the process with a rubber deadblow hammer - hitting the cap at a downward and outward angle. Wasn't too concerned since converted the entire hub including new grease-able caps.
Why did you use the EZlube hub drum kit and not the standard hub drum on your M1101 axle?


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JamesC

Adventurer
Why did you use the EZlube hub drum kit and not the standard hub drum on your M1101 axle?


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Sorry, just greaseable dust caps that were on the shelf and undamaged - which I don't use as such. I prefer to hand pack and lube the bearings.
 

MtnBubba

Observer
Sorry, just greaseable dust caps that were on the shelf and undamaged - which I don't use as such. I prefer to hand pack and lube the bearings.
I'm in the process of doing the same hub and brake change out that you did. So far it's all very straight forward and easy. However I'm hung up on the removal of the parking brake cable from the old brake backing plate. I don't want to destroy it so i've set it aside after quite a while of trying while it is tethered to the trailer.

Any recommendations on the removal of the parking brake cable from the backing plate?
 

JamesC

Adventurer
I think you can see from one of the first page pictures that we set it aside for 'later' as well. I'm sorry, I can't remember what I did in the end to get it off. I think I took apart a lot more things that I expected to have to touch..?

EDIT: Just went and looked at the 1st page. Pulled off various springs and their perches and then those 1/4 turn buttons to reveal the full backing plate. From there I think it was some twisting and pliers involved?
 

MtnBubba

Observer
I towed my trailer 2,000 miles behind my Tahoe with the shocks removed. It was only loaded with maybe 500 lbs of gear, but there was no noticeable change in the ride quality. It was an awful experience with near constant whiplash on the bumpier interstate roads in the midwest. I actually was experiencing a bit of buyers remorse.

So prior to the return trip I installed a #10 2,800 lb rated Dexter torsion axle. It is an entirely different trailer. Aside from the increased acceleration and stop distance required, I really don’t know that I am towing a trailer. It tracks behind the tow vehicle awesome. I am all around very happy with it.

 
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snr

New member
What ride height angle did you choose for your Dexter axle? From your photo it looks like it lowered the stock height by a few inches. Any specifications you could give would be great as I am looking to do the same conversion with my m1102.
 

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MtnBubba

Observer
What ride height angle did you choose for your Dexter axle? From your photo it looks like it lowered the stock height by a few inches. Any specifications you could give would be great as I am looking to do the same conversion with my m1102.
I used 22.5 deg. It did lower it a couple inches or more. Going with the 30” tires also lowered it more than an inch. I’ll measure it empty and post the new height.


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snr

New member
Is that 22 degrees down or up? The axles come in both options. My stock axel looks like it is 45 degrees down.
 
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MtnBubba

Observer
Is that 22 degrees down or up? The axles come in both options. My stock axel looks like it is 45 degrees down.
I used 22.5 deg down. The stock axle is 45 deg down.

My modified M1101 in the photo is 45.75” high empty.
 
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photomike72

Observer
Can you send me some info on the rims? I'm running an 80 series and am about to do the hub outer only swap based on your write up because I cannot find the chevy/dodge stock 8 lug rims anywhere at a reasonable price. Concerned about the backspacing as I definitely want the wheels/tires flush underneath the wheel wells.

I'm running factory Toyota 40th ANV LC rims, but may opt for some aftermarket wheels for the trailer.

Any help would be appreciated!

Cheers,
Mike

pic of my wheel style https://forum.ih8mud.com/attachments/044-jpg.491968/
 
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Naroko

New member
Bubba,

I like your topper can you give some information on it?



I towed my trailer 2,000 miles behind my Tahoe with the shocks removed. It was only loaded with maybe 500 lbs of gear, but there was no noticeable change in the ride quality. It was an awful experience with near constant whiplash on the bumpier interstate roads in the midwest. I actually was experiencing a bit of buyers remorse.

So prior to the return trip I installed a #10 2,800 lb rated Dexter torsion axle. It is an entirely different trailer. Aside from the increased acceleration and stop distance required, I really don’t know that I am towing a trailer. It tracks behind the tow vehicle awesome. I am all around very happy with it.

 

MtnBubba

Observer
Bubba,

I like your topper can you give some information on it?
I did what I thought was due diligence research and I found no simple way to buy a hard top that would fit or buy a tonneau cover that would fit in any configuration. I also considered having a piece of tonneau sewed at a sail or fabric shop and set up with snaps, and I couldn’t find what I wanted in the width I needed. My wife was more concerned about security, while my desire was to protect the contents from the elements.

I ended up making the top from marine plywood, possibly overkill, but I finished it with marine epoxy and covered it with the tonneau fabric. I had to make it in panels for the tonneau fabric to fit. If I had it to do over I might go with Line-x or DIY bedliner instead of the tonneau fabric. The tonneau is easy to replace, but it’s not a perfect solution. Bedliner fades so it’s a trade off.

I bought 1x1 aluminum angle from Lowe’s and bolted it to the sides using the existing holes. I added 1/4-20 rivet nuts along the front and two additional on each side for adequate support.

The front and third panel are secured to the angle with conveyor wheels, and rest on HDPE tape to reduce friction. The second and aft panel are hinged and snap to the rail when closed with spring loaded side bolt latches. I get some photos that I can add.

It locks by locking the tailgate, and should keep out the lazy criminals. I felt comfortable with it in hotel parking lots. It’s not totally weather proof. In fact in heavy rain the air flow, I assume, assures that a fair amount of water gets inside. I used, I think, a 1x2 stiffener under each panel and that was probably unnecessarily thick; It limits the height of the cargo put inside. However, I have found pelican cases seem to be the best solution and the biggest that are still manageable to lift without a hernia fit easily. It is clean in appearance and the panels are all inside the sides so if I add a rack, the panels will still open.


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