LR3 upgrades options what to do

Didn't see it but if you do not own a GAP Tool, it should be your very FIRST purchase! Kit out per your needs after; looks like you have tires and are not a-scared to use your LR3 so maybe some sliders after you decide on EAS/COIL refresh.
 

DCH109

Adventurer
Didn't see it but if you do not own a GAP Tool, it should be your very FIRST purchase! Kit out per your needs after; looks like you have tires and are not a-scared to use your LR3 so maybe some sliders after you decide on EAS/COIL refresh.
It is on the list and I was looking at the RSW tool as well. I like good customer service and when asking about a product without a response for days yet I ask a competitor about a product and they reply in minutes (well 12 hours due to the time zone) the decision is made for me.
The GAP tool is on order already. It was not initially part of the list above as it was a no brainier.
Thanks for pointing it out.
Tires yes, I am running Terra Grapplers, good on and off road.

I am going to stick with the EAS. I plan to pick up some spares to keep in the rig (this will also be cheaper than a full on coil conversion) and look into that emergency inflation kit.
So far I have found 2. 1 which is a complete unit that sits in the rig and used in case. The other is home made and used when need but requires more work to get it up and running since you have to disconnect the lines.
Obviously one is much cheaper then the other.

Still looking for other options as well.
Ultimately I would like to keep the EAS, as I like the ride. Also when loading gear into the back it will auto level unlike coils which I would have to have HD ones installed. That said coils are much simpler.
Seeing as mine so far is working as expected, I am not fixing anything by replacing it. Plus I get to install the LLAMS system and see how it works.
 

DiscoNels

Adventurer
You're going to love the LLAMS, I've got it and use it almost daily, it's a solid system. Regarding skid plates, if you were to add just one plate, I would add a Tactical 4x4 gas tank skid (or equivalent). I installed mine in 2013 and it is completely beat to sh*t saving my gas tank from deformation and leaks. I've only taken it off once and could barely get it back on from all the dents. Also, replace the mounting bolts with good stainless steel bolts and anti-seize.

If you don't put on overly protective rock sliders like the ones Tactical 4x4 make, you'll need some protective cover for your air compressor as that is a critical bit that will leave you with a 7000 lb. paper weight on the trail if you flatten the suspension system. Driving any distance on bump stops is painful.
 
It is on the list and I was looking at the RSW tool as well. I like good customer service and when asking about a product without a response for days yet I ask a competitor about a product and they reply in minutes (well 12 hours due to the time zone) the decision is made for me.
The GAP tool is on order already. It was not initially part of the list above as it was a no brainier.
Thanks for pointing it out.
Tires yes, I am running Terra Grapplers, good on and off road.

I am going to stick with the EAS. I plan to pick up some spares to keep in the rig (this will also be cheaper than a full on coil conversion) and look into that emergency inflation kit.
So far I have found 2. 1 which is a complete unit that sits in the rig and used in case. The other is home made and used when need but requires more work to get it up and running since you have to disconnect the lines.
Obviously one is much cheaper then the other.

Still looking for other options as well.
Ultimately I would like to keep the EAS, as I like the ride. Also when loading gear into the back it will auto level unlike coils which I would have to have HD ones installed. That said coils are much simpler.
Seeing as mine so far is working as expected, I am not fixing anything by replacing it. Plus I get to install the LLAMS system and see how it works.
Not sure the FASkit is worth all that money if you have the time to build your own. I have all the parts in my bin for a similar field kit I planned to install a while back and I think all of my parts were less than $75USD. Not taking away the quality of their kit, just saying if you plan for an emergency kit use only you might be better spending the money elsewhere; $450USD is a lot of money to sit for a "might use" kit.

On that note, if you do install the FASkit, a good recommendation and something I am doing is re-routing all of your air-lines to the max degree possible; the fronts run along the under bumper and can easily be re-routed with the wire harness and front valve body to the top over the radiator cooler and to the bags; this simple mod when you put new hoses in ensures you have access to all of your air lines without having to remove bumper components. Not as easy for the rear but be creative if you are running air lines anyway.

Also, USE FACTORY tail light bulbs or go LED; that change alone is 80% of the suspension fault you may get.

Ford Fusion MOTORCRAFT brake switch for your parts kit too.........dirt cheap from FORD dealer and must have for your trail kit IMO.
 

DCH109

Adventurer
Not sure the FASkit is worth all that money if you have the time to build your own. I have all the parts in my bin for a similar field kit I planned to install a while back and I think all of my parts were less than $75USD. Not taking away the quality of their kit, just saying if you plan for an emergency kit use only you might be better spending the money elsewhere; $450USD is a lot of money to sit for a "might use" kit.

On that note, if you do install the FASkit, a good recommendation and something I am doing is re-routing all of your air-lines to the max degree possible; the fronts run along the under bumper and can easily be re-routed with the wire harness and front valve body to the top over the radiator cooler and to the bags; this simple mod when you put new hoses in ensures you have access to all of your air lines without having to remove bumper components. Not as easy for the rear but be creative if you are running air lines anyway.

Also, USE FACTORY tail light bulbs or go LED; that change alone is 80% of the suspension fault you may get.

Ford Fusion MOTORCRAFT brake switch for your parts kit too.........dirt cheap from FORD dealer and must have for your trail kit IMO.
Oh I agree on the FAS kit, I think I can build my own for a fraction of the price. I am in no rush and while I will try to do some camping in the next few weeks to month (Cranberry region in WV) I am really doing a lot of this for a 4 week trip I am planning in 2021 so I have time. Right now I am getting ideas so I can plan out what I need to buy, when and when to install it. As the Rover is my DD It cannot be off the road for to many days at a time.

Thanks for the other tips as well. I will carry spares of the lights and grab a brake switch.

Spare so far are:
Bulbs
brake light switch
EAS front and rear blocks (or rebuild kits)
suspension height sensors
normal oils
glues, grease, locktight, etc.
fuses
Drive belts (mine are new, but never know)
gas door latch (I had to tape my fuel door shut on my old LR3 one when this broke on a trip)
More as I think of things.
 

Howski

Explorer
That’s a pretty good list. If you can pick up a working used compressor for a good deal as a spare I’d suggest it. I keep my old one, which was on its way out, as a spare and it’s good piece of mind
 
My parts/spares kit is very similar and in a small Pelican that never leaves the truck. On that note, my trail kit has two major components and the tools to do it on the trail; not that they are specific to JLR failures but they are specific to almost any high mileage vehicle and high use items that will leave you stuck; both are small enough to stuff in the cubbies or inside the panels wrapped up for emergency.

1) Alternator w/belt
2) Water Pump w/gasket/belt/sealant

Additional Options:
3) Valve Rebuild Kit
4) Compressor Rebuild Kit if you have the Hitachi; mine is AMK so no rebuild avail.
5) The rest are fuses, bulbs, relays (also FOMOCO and cheap).

No need for a spare compressor in the truck IMO unless you plan to change it off the trail and are willing to accept the space it takes up. If you have air, you can override the compressor and manually inflate and you're good to go; jack up and unload the bag of choice and you can CO2 inflate or bike pump if you have to manual and no onboard air. Having a compressor on the shelf would be a nice to have for sure for when you get home or need it sent to your hotel of choice...lol.

Outside of a blown bag, there is not much you can't get the EAS system up to lift height if you have access to air and your FASkit or a DiY set-up which is very similar. For less than $5 you can get a fitting and Shrader valve to unscrew your airline fitting and install direct on top of the bag for manual inflate and a Co2 bicycle fitting will inflate that bag in less than a minute.

Even a blown bag can be limped out with some creativity; just so happens I have some adjustable links in my vehicle to act as a rigid shock replacement for that extreme case the bag is completely shot and will not hold air. I'm not one to carry spare axles, shocks, bags, engine, transmission, etc. on the trail. Blown bags are extremely rare on a maintained vehicle; I don't care what the haters say about their made up stats. Far more complicated in design than shock/coil but not a showstopper by any means.

On that note, the benefit of 4 x IFS is a broken axle doesn't strand the vehicle like a solid axle will (in most cases); might induce some leaks but you can limp a vehicle home on 3 wheel drive or even two if needed depending on your terrain; same goes for a driveshaft although I'd ask what people are doing because the LR3 Shafts all around are pretty beefy to include non-HD ones.

Are any of these "exceptions" breakdowns easy and timely to accomplish, no of course not, but that is why we prepare and have ideas and back-up plans if needed.
 

DCH109

Adventurer
Nice,
Knowing the alt's can go on these that is a good idea to carry a spare. also the water pump. 4 weeks is long for a vehicle which by then should have about 185K on the odometer.
Really I am hoping to get at least 250-270K out of the vehicle before I have to decide what to do with it.
 

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The 4.4 has the alternator down low which is a water issue; there are alternator water proofing kits out there but d@mn they are expensive and I wish there was a relocation option but might have to go custom. Regardless, its just one of the things that can legit leave you stranded no matter what you drive. I use Ultima aftermarket and they are lifetime through Oreilly's over the Denso $700 unit; 30-45 minute swap on the trail if you need to and a 1/3 of the price but about less than 1/2 the life....hahaha
 

TOUGE

Active member
First thing you should ever do to a 4.4 is replace the plastic coolant tee/bleeder on top of the engine!!!! Also above 120,000miles its smart to replace all the coolant lines and plastic header/thermostat tank as well, I think is is in the factory maintenance manual to change them around then anyways. Then it will last you another 100,000+miles.

The 4.4 has the alternator down low which is a water issue; there are alternator water proofing kits out there but d@mn they are expensive and I wish there was a relocation option but might have to go custom. Regardless, its just one of the things that can legit leave you stranded no matter what you drive. I use Ultima aftermarket and they are lifetime through Oreilly's over the Denso $700 unit; 30-45 minute swap on the trail if you need to and a 1/3 of the price but about less than 1/2 the life....hahaha
I got a genuine Denso Alt from British Parts of Utah for $400 before tax/shipping. I had one of the cheap high current ebay ones, that only lasted a year and a bit.

Also if the car is from an area that salts the snowy/icy road check the resistance of all the battery/starter/alternator/ground cables, because the alternator is so low the cables can get the salty water/ice in them and corrode.
 
@TOUGE I thought about pulling the trigger on another Denso but since I somehow scored 2 spare Ultimas for the shelf and one in the truck the math worked out for me as almost a 2 year interval for swaps....lol. I think I got 75k or so out of the OG Denso and that is a great unit; I'm getting between 30-40k on the Ultima and since I had to buy one on the road once that cycle has been in place ever since.
 

canoel

New member
A second battery is usually my first upgrade.
In our LR3, my second battery powers my inverter, usb plugs so everything can be charged with the engine off, and interior lighting.
I guess I am paronoid about having a flat battery in the middle of nowhere.
 

Blaise

Well-known member
I use my primary battery for all that. I have a NOCO booster pack in case I kill the battery, but I also don't need to use an inverter or charge anything once I'm parked.
 

Thartek

New member
Resurrecting this a bit, but I keep a spare PCV valve on hand too. I’ve blown white smoke out the exhaust twice in mine, and once in my brother’s LR3. It’s a 5 minute replacement and only like $25. And that white smoke screen it spews when it goes is THICK!
 

DCH109

Adventurer
I need to get a spare PCV. I have one now, but it is going on the LR3 soon as I do not know the last time it was changed. I will probably carry something like that in the cargo storage bins.

The #2 battery I have been thinking about alot. However I am still up in the air. I have the battery, hold down and just need a controller. So maybe.

Initially I was thinking a RTT, but I came across a sweet 8' NCO 1969 Alaskan Camper (keep an eye out for a build thread) that I am picking up Saturday. I will put in my M101A2 and tow it. Which I just finished rebuilding the hydraulic brakes on so now I have brakes on the trailer. I was thinking electric, but it was cheaper to rebuild the hydraulic brakes including me making and bending my own lines.
The batteries on the Alaskan will be charged by solar so it will have its own power.

After looking at the OEM skid plate I decided this was going to be good enough and addressed the steering rack installed, new Land Rover one installed 2 weeks ago.
I will pick up a gas tank skid plate though as nothing worse than a hole in your fuel tank.

Now just collecting spares now for the Rover.
 
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