"Lola" - WreckDiver1321's 2005 Frontier CC/SB Nismo Build and Adventure Thread

07BlackSpecV

Adventurer
Got to admit, this has me worried as we are taking mine out to Colorado this summer for a week and plan on doing Imogene Pass at the end of the trip.
 

wreckdiver1321

Overlander
How many years/miles of 4hi did you put on it before it finally gave out? I only spend about 20% of my time in snow country & about half of that in 4hi. Never 4lo. Just curious how long I should keep that stock front diff before worrying about it
I bought the truck with 112k on it, it now has 171ish. Out of those 59,000 miles, I've probably been in 4x4 30% of the time. I think the more important numbers here would be how long I've spent on bigger tires. I've been on 285/75s since July 2015. Since then I've probably done close to 28,000 miles. So maybe that gives you an idea, but remember, every situation is a little different. There's no expiration date. Some people might never break them, some might within the first 10k.

Got to admit, this has me worried as we are taking mine out to Colorado this summer for a week and plan on doing Imogene Pass at the end of the trip.
The thing to remember is don't spin the wheels. Mine lasted right up until I forgot about that and got overzealous. Once you get the wheels spinning and there's a sudden stop, that's when they tend to snap. I wouldn't worry about it too much, just be careful with the wheel spin and remember to take it slow. I've seen some videos of Imogene, and I really doubt that trail would kill it.

Mine lasted a good long while keeping that in mind.
 

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Trikebubble

Adventurer
Got to admit, this has me worried as we are taking mine out to Colorado this summer for a week and plan on doing Imogene Pass at the end of the trip.
We took our Xterra on a 6000km trip from BC to Colorado this past summer, did the Mineral creek trail up to and over Engineer Pass along with some offloading near Colorado Springs and never had an issue. Our X currently has 250000km on it, and I always try to keep things going nice and slow (no front tire spinning ) if I can help it. My rear e-locker does now have some issues so it will have to be replaced, and I want to re-gear to be able to pull my trailer and offload with less stress on the motor. I haven't had any front diff issues as of yet, but as I will have to replace it in order to re-gear anyways, I'm thinking that upgrading to the M205 may be the way to go. My issue here is that we don't have any local gear shops to install a new gear set. Something I need to figure out if I'm going to get an M205 and have it (and the rear ) both re-geared.

Sent from the Mountains
 

Blackdawg

Dr. Frankenstein
Haha yeah for what I do, I've got enough. I can see the appeal, but for me the added cost and having my tires stick out like that isn't worth it. Haha yeah when we finally get back out together and do a rig swap, I might be screaming for a full Titan swap. Can't wait to drive Frank, and I'd be interested what you think of Lola, other than being a lowrider :cool:

Jesus man. When stuff fails on you, it fails CATASTROPHICALLY! You never "kinda" break something, do ya? :D

Sounds like all kinds of fun.

Go big or go home right? Haha

Yea I seem to always find a way to blow up something massively every other trip practically. Haha

Will have to get together again for sure soon!

Glad the diff swap went well.
 

Blackdawg

Dr. Frankenstein
Got to admit, this has me worried as we are taking mine out to Colorado this summer for a week and plan on doing Imogene Pass at the end of the trip.
Imogene pass is super easy. The only trail near there remotely difficult is Poughkeepsie Glutch. Everything else is simple roads you'll be fine.
 

Allof75

Pathfinder
Very smart solution, that seems like it'll be a great upgrade. I appreciate attempting to stay closer to stock width. I'm sure this information will be helpful for a few sad frontier owners with busted diffs. :sombrero:
 

wreckdiver1321

Overlander
Go big or go home right? Haha

Yea I seem to always find a way to blow up something massively every other trip practically. Haha

Will have to get together again for sure soon!

Glad the diff swap went well.
:bigok:

Very smart solution, that seems like it'll be a great upgrade. I appreciate attempting to stay closer to stock width. I'm sure this information will be helpful for a few sad frontier owners with busted diffs. :sombrero:
Indeed!
 

Trikebubble

Adventurer
Yessir, the Pathy CVs I bought are part number NI-8354 at $64.79 USD per side. The quality is great, the price is right, and I wouldn't hesitate to recommend them.
Cool. Thanks. That was the same part number I had seen. They are out of stock now, but I'll receive an alert when they are back in stock.
 

wreckdiver1321

Overlander
Cool. Thanks. That was the same part number I had seen. They are out of stock now, but I'll receive an alert when they are back in stock.
Wow, that was really fast! I know of one other guy that bought a set of four over on ClubFrontier. Hopefully they come back in stock soon. It would be really cool to see them carried regularly.
 

Trikebubble

Adventurer
That's a great write up. Just having those bolt on axles instead of the splined ones is such a bonus. It would make a trailside broken axle removal pretty easy. Now I just have to keep an eye out for the axles.

Sent from the Mountains
 

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wreckdiver1321

Overlander
That's a great write up. Just having those bolt on axles instead of the splined ones is such a bonus. It would make a trailside broken axle removal pretty easy. Now I just have to keep an eye out for the axles.

Sent from the Mountains
Thanks! Yeah I'm pretty impressed with them. I'll be watching to pick up a spare later, seeing as how they're nearly impossible to find.
 

wreckdiver1321

Overlander
A (Sort Of) Overland Honeymoon - Part 8

Alright, back to my report that I can't ever seem to finish!

Once back in Jasper, we decided to have some lunch at one of the restaurants we had passed during our walks through town. It was a little place called Something Else that served some amazing Greek food. We enjoyed the people watching and tasty food for a while until it was time to go back to the hotel and relax after the hike. On our walk back to the hotel, we stopped in to grab some ice cream at the small ice cream place off the main square. Then we headed back to the hotel for a while. As it turned to evening, we decided to make our way back to Athabasca falls so I could take some photos. It was much less crowded, and although the weather was a little cloudier, it was still a good scene to photograph. It was nice to linger without being hassled by excessive crowds. This waterfall is a very special place, and one I feel really exemplified the Canadian Rockies.







As the sun fell lower in the sky, we packed up the camera gear and drove back north towards Jasper. As we made the drive, I was in awe of the approaching alpenglow, and couldn't resist stopping to photograph Jasper in all her glory. What amazing views there are on the northern stretch of the Icefields Parkway. These are a few hours I won't soon forget.



This overlook here was especially impressive, and at this later hour, I had the view all to myself.





I'll be honest, between Jasper and Banff, I'd choose to explore Banff any day. But it's moments like this that will keep bringing me back. Jasper is a place of magic and unspeakable beauty. It has landscapes that are nearly impossible to comprehend, on a scale that is difficult to wrap your head around. On this, our final night in Jasper, my head was full of all the things we had seen, and all the things we had missed while we were there. We will without a doubt be back, as the call of her wilderness will never quite fade away.

We dined that night at the Jasper Brewing Company, which had fantastic food and even better beer. The service was great too. As we ate, we took the time to plan out some of the places we wanted to go after making our way south to Banff the next day. Our plan was to wake up early and catch the fantastic morning light so I could photograph it. Planning the trip while in the middle of it is liberating somehow, and it allows some leeway in the schedule. My favorite way to travel!

As we got back to the hotel, we packed up most of our stuff and went to bed early.

We woke early the next morning as the sun was coming up, in order to chase the light and watch the mountains come alive. I was a bit worried by the weather, with low hanging clouds covering Jasper in poor light, but as we drove south, the scenery sprang to life in a way I have never seen.







As we closed in on the Icefield Centre, the clouds opened up and created the most stunning things I've seen in all of my life. The light danced over the mountains and down in the valleys, showing off the unrivaled scenery. It was magical, absolutely magical. I was stunned beyond words.





The road rose up and passed by Tangle Creek Falls, nearly deserted at the early hour.



Then it dropped down to one of my favorite views along the Icefields Parkway. The valley opens up and offers up an absolutely spectacular view of Mount Andromeda and Mount Athabasca, made all the more special by the incredible light dancing around the snow-capped peaks. I parked on the side of the road and walked down by the river to take this photo. I lingered here for maybe 20 minutes, entranced by this blessed corner of the earth. This is one of my favorite moments of this trip. Silence and solitude in the early light, gazing on the splendid mountains of Jasper. Not a car on the road, my new wife asleep in the truck, just me and the river and the mountains.



We passed Athabasca Glacier and stopped at the Parker Ridge switchbacks to look at the fantastic Hilda Peak. With the summit surrounded by clouds, it was a phenomenal sight.





We made our way down south at a lazy pace, passing Saskatchewan Crossing and gazing out the windows happily. As we passed by Bow Lake, I caught a glimpse of a magnificent grizzly bear ambling across one of the parking areas, undoubtedly searching for something to eat and enjoying the warmth of the new sunshine. Not much farther down the road, there was a traffic cluster stopped to stare at a black bear up on the hill near the road. What luck!

Before too long, we made it to the day's intermediate stop at Lake Louise. We had a hike to do that was at the top of my wife's must-do list: the Tea House at Lake Agnes. However, as we pulled up to the village at Lake Louise, we realized we had made a "tactical error." We had arrived at Alberta's favorite tourist spot, in Alberta's most popular national park, on August 1st. Now, I know there are a few Canucks here that know what this means. For those of the American persuasion, August 1st is Canada's 4th of July. Yep, we had arrived at one of Canada's best tourism jewels on Canada's independence day. Oops. As a result, the signs told us we would not get to park, and we would miss out on the hike on this day. But after literally 45 minutes in line, we were directed to the lot where we were able to find a place to park. Success!

We gathered our stuff, strapped on our packs, and set off along the north shore of Lake Louise, destined for the Lake Agnes Tea House a little over two miles in. The hike is a good one, if a little strenuous thanks to the steep incline. After hiking most of the way and passing Mirror Lake, the trees open up and the scenery starts to stun.



Not long after, you reach a staircase at the base of a waterfall. At the top, you'll find the beautiful sights of the shore of Lake Agnes. We immediately headed for the Tea House, where we grabbed a table and ordered some tea and some lunch. Best Earl Grey and tuna sandwich I've ever had in my life.



The Lake Agnes Tea House is one of Banff's most interesting places in my opinion. The employees live there over the summer, hiking down every week to pack out the garbage and pack in the perishable supplies. The non-perishable stuff is flown in once a year by helicopter. The staff there was spectacular, very friendly and passionate about their surroundings. Probably one of my all time favorite lunch dates.



The best part of this place, though, as it is with most places in the Canadian Rockies, is the view!



We stayed there on the shore a little extra time, loving where we were.





These peaks are absolutely incredible, and being so up close and personal with them is fantastic.



We made our way down, riding on the achievement of checking this off our list. We were in good spirits as we returned to the truck and drove down to Banff. We planned on spending some time in the city, but as it would turn out, this was a more difficult proposition than it sounded.

To be continued...
 
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