Let's talk frying pans

Riptide

Explorer
I just got an 8” Matfer Bourgeat steel pan today, thinking I would try that as a one-pan solution in my chuck box, and leave my cast iron at home. I generally camp solo, so I’ve been using a little Snow Peak cast iron kit that I love.

But man, I’m not sure the new pan is any lighter. This thing is absolutely bombproof, and could easily double as a weapon. Beautifully simple, all steel, campfire or camp stove. Which makes me wonder about fuel useage to get it up to temp. Obviously not cooked in it yet. Interestingly, the insert that came with the pan recommended the potato peel/oil/salt method...
 

motoboss

Bad Influence
I ordered an 8inch Matfer last week from Amazon , was supposed to be here yesterday. Got a email this morning stating the package had been damaged by UPS so it was being returned and a refund when they get it back. WTF!

How do you damage a steel skillet?
 

DzlToy

Explorer
Field, pre-seasoned, smooth base, cast iron skillet is the best pan I have ever owned. I have taken it on car camping trips, to friend's houses to prepare meals and I use it 5-7 times per week in the kitchen.

After a few weeks of cooking (grass fed butter or hemp seed oil), the smooth inside becomes 100% non-stick and you simply wipe it out after cooking. There can be a bit of scrubbing required if you burn something quite badly, but that is operator error, IMO., which then results in said operator or his/her designee, scrubbing said skillet. :D

Well worth the $$$; you will never buy another skillet.

EDIT: the "ultimate overlanding pan" would be one of these guys: (get our your checkbook)

 
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jacobconroy

Hillbilly of Leisure
Cast iron sizing will be the diameter at the top of the pan. So, a 10" skillet really has an 8" cooking surface.
I've found that this isn't always the case. We have a local guy that restores old cast iron and sells it. Lots and lots of variety in his store.

While searching for a 10-inch max pan I found a lot of old ones marked (for example) "5" that were 8 inches O.D. I guess the 5 meant the bottom?
 

JaSAn

Active member
. . .
While searching for a 10-inch max pan I found a lot of old ones marked (for example) "5" that were 8 inches O.D. I guess the 5 meant the bottom?
Griswold (and I think other old cast iron skillets) used a number designator. A #5 Griswold skillet would be 8" top diameter, 6 3/4" bottom diameter, and 1 3/4 depth. A #6 would be: 9 1/8", 7 1/2", 1 7/8".

jim
 

jacobconroy

Hillbilly of Leisure
Griswold (and I think other old cast iron skillets) used a number designator. A #5 Griswold skillet would be 8" top diameter, 6 3/4" bottom diameter, and 1 3/4 depth. A #6 would be: 9 1/8", 7 1/2", 1 7/8".

jim
Makes perfect sense. :)
 

Roaddude

Long time off-grid vanlife adventurist
I've used a lot of cast iron skillets and assorted other frying pans over the years and have settled on chef-grade Vollrath sauté pans for both camp and home. They are professional grade, inexpensive, rugged as all hell, and clean up super easy.

I like them better than cast iron because I often take a pan with me in a pack for overnights when biking or canoeing. With curved sides, they're also easier for flipping food and sliding meals onto a plate, and stack perfectly with my dishes in the top of my kitchen box.

I first found them when watching the chefs cook at a Carraba's Italian Restaurant. They'd bring out a stack of 10" sauté pans from the back, use one for each meal they were cooking, slide the meal onto a plate, then grab another. I asked the manager what they were using that would take such daily abuse. He said was ordering more soon and would get me a couple.

I liked it so much for cooking and ease of cleaning I got more as gifts for friends who love to cook (they love them), then got an 8" and 12" for myself as well as some of their sauce pans. Been using them ever since and love them. Best all around cookware I've ever owned.

The trick for easy cleaning is get as much food out of it as you can before eating, and don't let them sit and cool with food in them. Put a little water in them while they're still warm or warm them back up a bit after dinner. They just wipe clean after that, seriously. I've found that seasoning them when you first get them, by washing then heating good oil in them, and wiping them down well with warm oil a few times makes a difference, too.

As the post below indicates, I get mine now from webstaurantstore.com - a pro restaurant supply place.

Here's the 10" I use the most, only $14.89.

Here's my 10" and 8" pans. Both have lids with a great heat-free handle, too.

sautepans_8810-800jpg.jpg

I loaned my 12" Vollrath to a new friend one time. He made pizza in it and scored the hell out of the pan when cutting the pizza. I moaned about it online in a post. Vollrath heard about it and sent me a new one with a domed lid, free of charge.

Ever since that pan came back scored from my friend, my sauté pans have been added to my "don't ask to borrow this" list.

http://instagr.am/p/BzwFQprgcq6/
I also have the Partner griddle and love it, too. Seasoned before first use and cleaned regularly the same way as my sauté pans; with a little water left to sit as the griddle cools, it will wipe clean.

Look at the sheen on this beast. That's how it looks every time when I'm done cooking:
partnergriddle_8600-900.jpg

..

http://instagr.am/p/BevJrFtl91X/
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verdesard0g

Observer
My camping equipment has to be easy to maintain as well as functional. I like this hexclad pan even better than cast iron! And the stainless steel is not bad either. I do still bring a small cast iron pan with me though.

1.jpg2.jpg3.jpg4.jpg
 

frankthecampguy

New member
Need a frying pan. Been using cast iron for years but open to new ideas.

Prefer a pan that is no stick but not teflon. I'm ham fisted and use metal utensils.

Edited to add... Easy clean up would be a godsend too.

Let fly with what works for you.
You can try All Chad pans. It's non stick and non teflon. I have a number of all-clad pans. Never a complaint until now. These do not have the claimed flat bottoms. They are convex, and fat pools at the edges.
 

LocoCoyote

World Citizen
Need a frying pan. Been using cast iron for years but open to new ideas.

Prefer a pan that is no stick but not teflon. I'm ham fisted and use metal utensils.

Edited to add... Easy clean up would be a godsend too.

Let fly with what works for you.
Petromax cast iron frying pans are my only tried and true choice. The only downside is the weight.
 

Beowulf

Expedition Leader
Anyone ever pop the rivets and use a bolt and wing nut to attach the handle? Just trying to figure out a way for it to take up as little space a possible, but still be used like traditional skillet.
 

Roaddude

Long time off-grid vanlife adventurist
Anyone ever pop the rivets and use a bolt and wing nut to attach the handle? Just trying to figure out a way for it to take up as little space a possible, but still be used like traditional skillet.
That's a great idea, and I have a damaged 12" Vollrath I might try it with before doing my good one.

Though the way I keep my 8" & 10" sauté pans--tucked together on top of my stove and under the kitchen box lid--I don't really need to cut their handles, having the 12" with a removable handle will make it fit my storage a lot easier.

partner-straight_6267.jpeg

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