Laws Regarding Aggressive Animals

redthies

Renaissance Redneck
Because laws vary so much between jurisdictions that there is no way you could ever give a definitive answer. The ability to legally defend oneself or ones property depends on so many variables that it’s ridiculous to try.

For example in BC where I live (along with a previous poster) the variables are massive. He has stated you would “be charged for discharging a firearm in a provincial park”. That’s not always true. In some provincial parks, hunting is permitted, so obviously you can shoot there. What is harassing you? Pack of wolves? Ok, shoot. Grizzly? Don’t shoot as of this past year, but previously, shoot. Black bear? That depends. What time of year is it? Where are you in the province? Are you a licensed hunter or just a camper. Even if you ARE a licensed hunter, do you have a tag for the species that is harassing you? Is the animal alone, or in the company of its offspring?

The above is just a portion of the regulations for ONE of 61 different states and provinces in the US and Canada. Now multiply by the number of management units in those 61 places. BC has around 300 different MUs, and laws vary from one to the next. You could be legal in one spot, walk 100 yards and be in a different MU where your actions could be illegal. But your actions are also open to interpretation by a Conservation Officer. Did you get a guy on a good day or bad?

How do you like those facts, @shade? Some states may have a blanket policy covering this type of thing, but that still leaves 61 different options. If the OP said “am I legal in “X” at “Y” time of year under circumstance “Z”, then someone could give him an answer. It’s great to have discussions about this sort of thing, but without even a little bit of specific information, it’s pointless.
 

MOguy

Explorer
Because laws vary so much between jurisdictions that there is no way you could ever give a definitive answer. The ability to legally defend oneself or ones property depends on so many variables that it’s ridiculous to try.

For example in BC where I live (along with a previous poster) the variables are massive. He has stated you would “be charged for discharging a firearm in a provincial park”. That’s not always true. In some provincial parks, hunting is permitted, so obviously you can shoot there. What is harassing you? Pack of wolves? Ok, shoot. Grizzly? Don’t shoot as of this past year, but previously, shoot. Black bear? That depends. What time of year is it? Where are you in the province? Are you a licensed hunter or just a camper. Even if you ARE a licensed hunter, do you have a tag for the species that is harassing you? Is the animal alone, or in the company of its offspring?

The above is just a portion of the regulations for ONE of 61 different states and provinces in the US and Canada. Now multiply by the number of management units in those 61 places. BC has around 300 different MUs, and laws vary from one to the next. You could be legal in one spot, walk 100 yards and be in a different MU where your actions could be illegal. But your actions are also open to interpretation by a Conservation Officer. Did you get a guy on a good day or bad?

How do you like those facts, @shade? Some states may have a blanket policy covering this type of thing, but that still leaves 61 different options. If the OP said “am I legal in “X” at “Y” time of year under circumstance “Z”, then someone could give him an answer. It’s great to have discussions about this sort of thing, but without even a little bit of specific information, it’s pointless.
This is the world wide web and you expect a definitive answer?

The OP said:
" If you want to post your views on those subjects please post there to keep that discussion going. "

Then he said:
"I am sure that different states and venues may have different laws but I would like to soak up as much knowledge as I can."

And that is exactly what is happening.
 

shade

Well-known member
Because laws vary so much between jurisdictions that there is no way you could ever give a definitive answer. The ability to legally defend oneself or ones property depends on so many variables that it’s ridiculous to try.

For example in BC where I live (along with a previous poster) the variables are massive. He has stated you would “be charged for discharging a firearm in a provincial park”. That’s not always true. In some provincial parks, hunting is permitted, so obviously you can shoot there. What is harassing you? Pack of wolves? Ok, shoot. Grizzly? Don’t shoot as of this past year, but previously, shoot. Black bear? That depends. What time of year is it? Where are you in the province? Are you a licensed hunter or just a camper. Even if you ARE a licensed hunter, do you have a tag for the species that is harassing you? Is the animal alone, or in the company of its offspring?

The above is just a portion of the regulations for ONE of 61 different states and provinces in the US and Canada. Now multiply by the number of management units in those 61 places. BC has around 300 different MUs, and laws vary from one to the next. You could be legal in one spot, walk 100 yards and be in a different MU where your actions could be illegal. But your actions are also open to interpretation by a Conservation Officer. Did you get a guy on a good day or bad?

How do you like those facts, @shade? Some states may have a blanket policy covering this type of thing, but that still leaves 61 different options. If the OP said “am I legal in “X” at “Y” time of year under circumstance “Z”, then someone could give him an answer. It’s great to have discussions about this sort of thing, but without even a little bit of specific information, it’s pointless.
It's a general discussion based on individual experiences and knowledge. Thanks for sharing yours, but there's no need to discount information from others.

Correct me if I'm wrong, but your post can be condensed to, "It depends. Ask the regulating authorities for specific regulations for specific areas, and be mindful that you can still run afoul of the law in uncertain circumstances."

Sounds accurate to me.
 

redthies

Renaissance Redneck
I guess your statement: "Because laws vary so much between jurisdictions that there is no way you could ever give a definitive answer." confused me.
You must be easily confused then. It clearly states you couldn’t GIVE a definitive answer, not that I expected one.
 

redthies

Renaissance Redneck
It's a general discussion based on individual experiences and knowledge. Thanks for sharing yours, but there's no need to discount information from others.

Correct me if I'm wrong, but your post can be condensed to, "It depends. Ask the regulating authorities for specific regulations for specific areas, and be mindful that you can still run afoul of the law in uncertain circumstances."

Sounds accurate to me.
It could be condensed, but I was asked to set you straight, so I used my areas laws as an example.

We could go round and round with this, but your condensing of my post sones up the whole thing perfectly: Check with your local authorities.

Carry on...
 

redthies

Renaissance Redneck
What do you expect?
That’s a loaded question!:oops: I expect that I’ve said my piece, and you guys can continue without me.

And for the record, I wasn’t trying to disrespect anyone or their opinion. I was only trying to point out the sheer number of variables make it an almost pointless thread. Much like asking the question “How long is a piece of string?”
 

mep1811

Gentleman Adventurer
Well, back in the USA and access to the 2A, my concern would be with wild dogs or aggressive dogs running loose by irresponsible owners. laws vary state to state but being able to articulate the threat is critical.

I have found that the owners of aggressive dogs running loose to be aggressive as well and a possible threat. Both times I've encountered that , I just left the area .
 

shade

Well-known member
Well, back in the USA and access to the 2A, my concern would be with wild dogs or aggressive dogs running loose by irresponsible owners. laws vary state to state but being able to articulate the threat is critical.

I have found that the owners of aggressive dogs running loose to be aggressive as well and a possible threat. Both times I've encountered that , I just left the area .
Quite often, wild or aggressive dog attacks can be thwarted by a closed car door, even back in the USA.

Bears? Not so easily.
 

MOguy

Explorer
Quite often, wild or aggressive dog attacks can be thwarted by a closed car door, even back in the USA.

Bears? Not so easily.
I say not destroying wild agressive feral animals (given the chance to do so legally) is irresponsible.
 
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