Land Rover ideas for Jeeps

pith helmet

Well-known member
All I see a lot of additional weight. Harder to extract a 5 ton vehicle from a rutted track in the Congo…I mean, that HAS to be where they are planning to go?
 

wandererr

Adventurer
I have seen someplace an 'underceiling' storage for the cargo are of the JK. The thing is that whatever you store there needs to be not 'heat sensitive'
 

jscherb

Expedition Leader
I have seen someplace an 'underceiling' storage for the cargo are of the JK. The thing is that whatever you store there needs to be not 'heat sensitive'
You've probably seen it here. I've got overhead Molle panels in My JKU and my LJ and also installed one in my son's JK 2dr. I posted this photo a few weeks ago, I used the panel to store some of the gear I took on my recent Colorado expedition.



There's no requirement that things not be heat sensitive with this panel.

Some videos... JK 2dr:


JKU:


LJ:


These are all the Molle panel version; there's also a version with a lockable storage compartment, I can post photos of that if anyone wants to see it.
 

jscherb

Expedition Leader
A recent issue of Land Rover Owner had an ad from ARB featuring mounting accessories for their their Base Rack. This image was in that ad:



This image is on the ARB web site:



The ARB web site has an animation showing some of the mounting accessories and a list of them all: https://arbusa.com/roof-racks/arb-base-rack/roof-rack-accessories/

I don't see too many people using their roof racks for lots of smaller individual items, maybe more in the Land Rover world than the Jeep world, but many of the ARB straps/brackets for particular accessories seem like they might be useful and many would be easy to DIY if they were needed.

Making custom straps isn't difficult, here's an example. Last year I made a mount for a propane tank for my kitchen. It consists of a tray bolted to what are basically shelf brackets which bolt to the tailgate hinges. I made up a strap to secure the propane tank to the tray, it's very similar to the strap on the propane tank in the ARB photos above:



The tray can also be secured to the roof rack:



I made the strap by modifying an inexpensive ratchet strap. I sewed new hooks on the end because the large round hooks that came on the original strap were much too large for the slots in the tray I made for the tank, and I sewed an extra length of webbing in the center to go around the tank's valve.



Depending on what you're securing and where you are securing it to, the big round hooks that come on the ends of most inexpensive ratchet straps may work fine, but other types of hooks, including the ones I used, are available on eBay and from various sewing/strap sources.

How the double section of strap goes around the valve:



Most sewing machines are capable of sewing through several layers of webbing and the stitching isn't difficult, custom straps like these make an easy first sewing project. It's best to use an outdoor-rated polyester thread for these, Joann Fabrics sells polyester outdoor thread in a range of colors.

I've said this before, but a sewing machine can be one of the most useful power tools to have when outfitting a vehicle for an expedition.
 

pith helmet

Well-known member
I have a cargo net across the rear of my JK that I refer to as my "attic". I've found it useful on a number of occasions.
We have the same over the second row seat area, seats removed. We stuff it full of jackets, hats, rain gear and other outerwear. As we sleep in there the only issue we have had is condensation between the gear and the fiberglass.
 

jscherb

Expedition Leader
This homebuilt camper is in the September issue of Land Rover Owner.





It's in a short story on the mostly about the guy who built it and his other Land Rovers so there's not too much detail about the camper top or how it works. This inside view doesn't reveal much about how it lifts but it looks like it might be manual.



A quick photo-edit Gladiator version...





A few years ago I did some concept design work on an LJ camper top based on the Safari Cab hardtop that's similar to the one above:



I built a quick and rough scale model of the design on my 1:18 LJ:



It would be relatively easy to fit a roof like this to an LJ Safari Cab because the roof unbolts and the new roof can be bolted in its place.



The roof on my JKU also unbolts so something like this could be done to that one too.



I thought about building something like this for one of the Jeeps but decided I prefer a roof top tent - the RTT is easier to keep in the garage when not needed and put on the roof when needed.
 

jscherb

Expedition Leader
A recent issue of Land Rover Owner had an ad from ARB featuring mounting accessories for their their Base Rack. This image was in that ad:



This image is on the ARB web site:



The ARB web site has an animation showing some of the mounting accessories and a list of them all: https://arbusa.com/roof-racks/arb-base-rack/roof-rack-accessories/

I don't see too many people using their roof racks for lots of smaller individual items, maybe more in the Land Rover world than the Jeep world, but many of the ARB straps/brackets for particular accessories seem like they might be useful and many would be easy to DIY if they were needed.

Making custom straps isn't difficult, here's an example. Last year I made a mount for a propane tank for my kitchen. It consists of a tray bolted to what are basically shelf brackets which bolt to the tailgate hinges. I made up a strap to secure the propane tank to the tray, it's very similar to the strap on the propane tank in the ARB photos above:



The tray can also be secured to the roof rack:



I made the strap by modifying an inexpensive ratchet strap. I sewed new hooks on the end because the large round hooks that came on the original strap were much too large for the slots in the tray I made for the tank, and I sewed an extra length of webbing in the center to go around the tank's valve.



Depending on what you're securing and where you are securing it to, the big round hooks that come on the ends of most inexpensive ratchet straps may work fine, but other types of hooks, including the ones I used, are available on eBay and from various sewing/strap sources.

How the double section of strap goes around the valve:



Most sewing machines are capable of sewing through several layers of webbing and the stitching isn't difficult, custom straps like these make an easy first sewing project. It's best to use an outdoor-rated polyester thread for these, Joann Fabrics sells polyester outdoor thread in a range of colors.

I've said this before, but a sewing machine can be one of the most useful power tools to have when outfitting a vehicle for an expedition.
The ARB photos got me thinking...

Many of the tie-down straps on the market like the ones pictured below, have big hooks. These hooks may not fit around the bars of many roof racks and even if they do, they sometimes are awkward because of their size and shape, especially if you're going to try to tie down a bunch of smaller things like the ARB photos in the previous post.



I decided to see how well G-Hooks would work on a tie-down strap so I picked up some metal G-Hooks on Etsy:



I found a broken cam buckle strap on the road the other day while riding my bicycle (you'd be amazed at how many tools I have that I found on the road during bicycle rides), it's a good candidate for doing a quick test so I sewed G-Hooks on each end:



G-Hooks work very nicely on things like roof racks because they enable the strap to wrap nicely around the bars of the rack:



Part of my rack is still on the workbench so I tested the strap with a metal tool box.



The strap is too short for this toolbox; ideally with a cam buckle there would be enough left over to tie a knot. Also ideally the box would be secured with two straps, one 90 degrees to the other. And cam buckles in any case probably don't grip well enough to keep cargo like this in place on a rough trail, but Harbor Freight offers a set of 4 ratchet straps, on sale as I write this for $7.99/4 - they've got big hooks on the end but those could be swapped for G-Hooks.

I did a quick 225-lb. gorilla test to see how the G-Hooks would stand up to stress - I wrapped the strap around a 2x4 in the basement ceiling, secured it with the G-Hook and lifted myself up by the strap. The G-Hook wasn't affected by the load.

I think G-Hook ends on ratchet straps would be very useful to secure many items to a roof rack. I'll probably pick up a set of HF ratchet straps while they're on sale and convert the ends to G-Hooks.
 

Vinman

Observer
Did you ever think about making tie-down straps using the G-hooks with Rollercam buckles? If so, you could put me on a list to buy a dozen or so.
 

jscherb

Expedition Leader
Did you ever think about making tie-down straps using the G-hooks with Rollercam buckles? If so, you could put me on a list to buy a dozen or so.
I have thought about it - I haven't used rollercam buckles yet but they seem like a very good idea so I'll pick some up and make some test straps. I'll post about them once I've made a test sample or two.

I don't sell anything though, I just do these projects for my own use and enjoyment. But straps like these are very easy to make, anyone with a basic knowledge of how to work a sewing machine can make them. Doesn't everyone know someone who has a sewing machine who could sew the ends on straps?

My sewing machines are my favorite power tools and extremely useful for outfitting a Jeep. I posted the photo below earlier in this thread, I used this machine for years and sewed everything with it. including factory soft top fabric to make roll-up soft sides for my Safari Cab. This is my early 60's Janome New Home Dual Duty machine, made back when many sewing machines we made in Japan and all metal. They're regularly on eBay for $100 or so and I think they're a great investment.



I posted a series of simple "starter" Jeep sewing projects in the last week or so in my JK thread, starting here: https://expeditionportal.com/forum/...factory-hardtops.127687/page-324#post-2951881

My primary sewing machine is a more industrial type machine now, but I still use the Janome - there are some things that it can still do better than my HD.
 
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Raul

Adventurer
On the ratchet straps I loop the strap around the rack bar and use the double strap on the ratchet drum. 1630018958205.png
 

rnArmy

Adventurer
I use NRS cam buckle straps. They have two different types; one type has loops on the ends, so you just wrap the loop around the whatever, and pull the strap through. They come in different lengths. And there's pretty much no limit as to what size of whatever you wanted to wrap them around.

You could probably just cut the metal hooks off whatever ones you have, and then fold the ends over and sew them into a loop.

Kayak on Jeep.8.jpg

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X-bull.5.jpg
 
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jscherb

Expedition Leader
We've all seen trash bags that hang off the spare tire, but what about one that hangs off a jerry can?



Australian company Stray Systems says:

Most touring set ups have either a Spare Tyre or a Jerry Can on the back. Spare Tyre Bags are a dime a dozen, but Jerry Can bags? Well they don’t exist… until now. J1-A Jerry Can Bag utilises your Jerry Can, creating extra storage external to your vehicle.

Ideal for carrying stinky trash or wet and dirty gear, the J1-A securely attaches to all Jerry Cans making use of normally wasted space. Extensively tested in the brutal Australian outback for over 12 months, we are confident in this systems simplicity and longevity. Smaller than our TB-1 Spare Tyre Bag, it comes in at 25L of volume, which is 25% more capacity than the jerry can it attaches to.




A while back I sewed an insulated cover for Rotopax containers (to eliminate/reduce the "Rotopax bulge" when the containers are heated by the sun), and while I was at it I sewed a gear bag that hangs on the Rotopax but I hadn't thought about doing a bag to hang off a jerry can, maybe I'll sew one to see if it might be useful.



Also unusual and interesting is the way the small cans are strapped to the top of the jerry cans:



 

jscherb

Expedition Leader
Did you ever think about making tie-down straps using the G-hooks with Rollercam buckles?...
I picked up a roller cam buckle to see how well they work. I sewed a strap with it and with G-hooks on either end as a test.



On the rack:



These buckles hold very well, they seem to hold better than the non-roller variety. With the roller buckle and the G-hook ends these are very useful straps.

A couple of caveats though - I only sewed one strap so far, and securing something like the slippery and heavy (when full) military Scepter container shown above really would need two straps crossed over it to secure it well, so don't take my photo above with one strap as a recommended practice. The G-hooks I used are aluminum and I think under very heavy loads they might bend, so I think the best practice for G-hooks would be to double-wrap the end, that way there's almost no stress on the hook:



The G-hooks I used are aluminum, for heavier loads steel hooks would be stronger. Here's a source for heat-treated steel G-hooks which would probably be much stronger than the aluminum ones I used: https://www.rockywoods.com/G-Hook-wave-1-Slot-Size-Heat-Treated-Steel-Berry-Compliant

For many heavier things I think I'll still prefer ratchet straps, but roller cam buckle straps seem to be a good option for all but the heaviest stuff.

One thing that always bothers me about straps - what to do with the loose end? I came up with something to keep the excess end of the strap under control. It's a pretty simple piece of Velcro One-Wrap sewed so it can slide over any strap; once the excess strap is folded the One-Wrap is used to secure the excess - I'll call it a "Strap Keeper"...

In this photo the excess strap is contained by the Strap Keeper:



The Strap Keeper on the sewing table:





I plan to make Strap Keepers for all of my ratchet straps - I can never figure out what to do with the loose ends after I secure something with them and the Strap Keeper solves that problem very nicely.

BTW here's a source for roller cam buckles if anyone wants to sew their own (they also sell premade straps): https://www.rollercam.com/shop/rollercam-buckle. Another source for premade roller cam buckle straps is Multus: https://www.multusproducts.com/search.php?search_query=roller
 
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