Land Rover ideas for Jeeps

Zeep

Adventurer
Magazines from the UK are a bit delayed due to worldwide Covid + USPS disruption, I'll post more Land Rover Ideas for Jeeps when more magazines come in.
Not that surprising, since print media seems to be dying a slow death in the U.S.
The selection of Off road magazines has dwindled to a trickle!
 

jscherb

Expedition Leader
Not that surprising, since print media seems to be dying a slow death in the U.S.
The selection of Off road magazines has dwindled to a trickle!
More people must read in the U.K. than here because there are still at least 3 Land Rover specific magazines over there, and all 3 have more pages every month than JP or Four Wheeler ever had even in their best days. I've subscribed to two of them for years.



 

Vinman

Observer
More people must read in the U.K. than here because there are still at least 3 Land Rover specific magazines over there, and all 3 have more pages every month than JP or Four Wheeler ever had even in their best days. I've subscribed to two of them for years.



Yes, the LR magazines seem more like a book than magazine.
 

ihatemybike

Explorer
Based on the Land Rover example, I've begun design of a set of bolt-on jack points for the Wrangler. Instead of a round pin, at this point my preliminary design uses a standard 1 1/4" receiver tube. Final design may be a slightly smaller square tube, but for now I'm basing the design on the standard 1 1/4" tube because if could have other applications - for example cargo/gear carriers that slip into the receiver tubes (which would of course be slipped out when you needed to use the tube as a jack point.
Sounds similar to the VW T2 Transporter setup.
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jscherb

Expedition Leader
A few new magazines came in and I went through some more older ones, so I'll pick up the thread again.


"Air Tents" are much more popular in Europe than they are here. Land Rover Monthly recently featured this air tent:



For those not familiar with air tents, instead of tent poles they are held up with tubes that get filled with air. Pump them up and the tent is erected. Let the air out and the tent collapses.

That's a ground tent; I haven't seen any roof top air tents in the Land Rover magazines yet, but here's one:



It's made by am Austrian company called GentleTent: https://gentletent.com/en/gt-roof

How it erects:


A few more images from the web site:





What do people think of the idea?

I was approached by a company in 2019 about doing a roof top air tent. This was a U.S. company that had connections with an air tent manufacturer in Europe and they were considering doing an Air RTT for the U.S. market. I did some concept drawings for them but ultimately decided not to go ahead with the project at the time. They may still do it, from time to time they mention it to me.
 

jscherb

Expedition Leader
I’m not an RTT user, but my first thoughts:

How does it hold up against wind? Do temperature swings cause low pressure sagging?

Keep a tube of tube of seam sealant and tape close at hand.
I haven't camped in one, but I have looked at larger air tents in some detail as part of the discussion with the company that was talking to me about doing an air RTT for the U.S. market. They're surprisingly rigid, and the item in the Land Rover magazine says that the ground tent, properly staked, can withstand a force 10 storm (Beaufort scale), which has winds up to about 60 mph.
 

krick3tt

Adventurer
I had a roof top tent mounted my M416A trailer. It was really a good deal till one night camping in Canyon de Che the wind came up and the fly was flapping so much (really loud) and the tent was shaking so much we abandoned it, let it down and slept in the Pinzgauer.
Shortly after I sold it and the trailer. Big mistake selling the trailer but the tent not so much. It also collected a lot of condensation in the cold to the point it was raining inside the tent. That might happen in any cloth tent and I have always been told to not touch the roof of a tent in the cold or rain.
Just mine experience, yours may be different and I am sure there some that will voice their opinions that might differ.
 

bitbckt

Member
I haven't camped in one, but I have looked at larger air tents in some detail as part of the discussion with the company that was talking to me about doing an air RTT for the U.S. market. They're surprisingly rigid, and the item in the Land Rover magazine says that the ground tent, properly staked, can withstand a force 10 storm (Beaufort scale), which has winds up to about 60 mph.
Yes, on the ground, guyed out as shown, I believe it could withstand plenty of wind. In RTT configuration, I’m left wondering.
 

pith helmet

Well-known member
I’m not a user of the RTTs either, but these leave something to be desired aesthetically. The phrase ‘homemade sin’ comes to mind.

I’d say @jscherb could design a better looking one, if that is possible.
 

jscherb

Expedition Leader
I’m not a user of the RTTs either, but these leave something to be desired aesthetically. The phrase ‘homemade sin’ comes to mind.

I’d say @jscherb could design a better looking one, if that is possible.
Maybe that's why a company approached me before the pandemic and asked if I'd be interested in designing one :). I did some concept drawings for them, which they liked, but unfortunately I can't post them here because it still could become an active project.
 

jscherb

Expedition Leader
I've been experimenting with a Swiss Army surplus water bladder recently, I learned about the product from an article I posted from one of the magazines earlier in this thread so I ordered one. Here's the original post:


That bladder has a cap/nozzle that's not very useful for use as a water source to a sink or shower, so I modified the cap to have a quick-disconnect. This is the nozzle as it comes, it's got a push-button valve on it and a spout that doesn't lend itself to attaching a hose:



Modified, the stock spout and valve is removed and replaced with a quick-disconnect fitting:





In action:


The water flow is very good but I thought it would be a bit more satisfying shower if it had more pressure. I've been working on a solution, I posted about it yesterday: https://expeditionportal.com/forum/...factory-hardtops.127687/page-310#post-2898885

Another water bladder was recently featured in the magazine:



At about 7 gallons, it's a little longer than the Swiss Army surplus one I've been experimenting with. Here's a link: https://www.frontrunneroutfitters.com/en/us/water-bladder-27l-kit-bag-plus-inner.html

Seems like it would make a good warm water source for a shower (or warm water for washing dishes?). If there's extra room on a roof rack, a simple tray with some straps would make a good place for it. Some concept images:





When full it would weight 59 lbs., that weight up top could be a consideration for some Jeeps.
 
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