Land Rover ideas for Jeeps

jscherb

Expedition Leader
Great attachment of the box to the rack. If you are going to add footmen loops to the bottom of the box you will be making holes to attach them. Perhaps a few more holes to attach the box to the rack might also be an idea, to secure it from the inside, as the hooks you have attached the box with are easy for another less than honorable person to remove it for you. I am not a thief but to keep things I try to think like one, as in how can I lose this?
Thanks. The way the nuts for the j-bolts are situated and because they're nylock nuts, they're very inconvenient to remove without a deep socket. With a deep socket, they're very quick and easy, but I figure the average thief won't have a deep socket handy and won't want to spend the time necessary to fight with the awkwardly-placed nuts on both sides for long enough to steal the box. ;).
 

jscherb

Expedition Leader
Here's a table/storage box that mounts to a Defender tailgate:





To me it seems maybe a bit large and bulky for a Wrangler tailgate (and maybe even for the Defender tailgate).


Maybe that one above isn't so large and bulky after all...





There are options for it...

With the Wheelbarrow-extension, you can use the Travel Kitchen around your home and garden. For these times that you’re not on the road…


Or use the bicycle version for a proper picnic in the park.


Seriously?

Check it out at https://www.wanderjagt.com/
 

jscherb

Expedition Leader
Another table/storage box that bolts to the tailgate, this one is a DIY job. You can see from the background this one is in the U.S.





It's easy to imagine a DIY project something like on a Wrangler tailgate, here's a quick sketch on a JK tailgate:




While we're on the topic of tailgate storage boxes... I've got MORryde Storegates on both my JKU and LJ tailgates:





On my LJ I have a version without a table, it has a cargo net to secure whatever is inside:

 

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autism family travels

Active member
Hey Jeff, can you remember a while back when I said I thought I saw a TJ with your safari roof on it? Well, my buddy bought that jeep and it's not. It is a tj rubicon that was extended 16 inches with 110" wheel base. the guy builds boats for a living and extended it and made a fiberglass roof for it. It's a tidy job, however it weighs a shitton. I would post a picture but they are saying my picture is to large.
 

jscherb

Expedition Leader
Hey Jeff, can you remember a while back when I said I thought I saw a TJ with your safari roof on it? Well, my buddy bought that jeep and it's not. It is a tj rubicon that was extended 16 inches with 110" wheel base. the guy builds boats for a living and extended it and made a fiberglass roof for it. It's a tidy job, however it weighs a shitton. I would post a picture but they are saying my picture is to large.
Nice to know I'm not the only one who builds their own fiberglass hardtops :).

If a hardtop was built like a boat hull it would be very heavy. Hardtops are subjected to far less stress than boat hulls and can be built much lighter, with reinforcement in only specific areas.
 

autism family travels

Active member
Nice to know I'm not the only one who builds their own fiberglass hardtops :).

If a hardtop was built like a boat hull it would be very heavy. Hardtops are subjected to far less stress than boat hulls and can be built much lighter, with reinforcement in only specific areas.
I am guessing he built it like a boat. It's SOLID....Like me jump on it as hard as I can and not even flex SOLID. I am a little over 200lbs. Id say it's over 1/4 inch thick. I will scale down a picture for you.
 

jscherb

Expedition Leader
You can tell that is a stretch, because of no overhang behind the rear wheel.
Probably should call it a "TJ-6", it's lengthened between the door and the rear wheel arch just like the factory did when they made the CJ-6.

Wouldn't be hard to make a factory looking TJ-6 emblem for it... the other day while playing with my new Cricut machine I made a "TJ-7" emblem in vinyl...



I was attempting a replica of the factory emblems that Jeep did for the CJ5/7/8:



And speaking of the CJ-6, if there ever was a Jeep that looks like a Land Rover, it would have to be this one:









This is a CJ-6 with custom bodywork done for the U.S. Forest Service. More photos and the story here:

 

autism family travels

Active member
Looks like a quality job.
the guy that did it did an awesome job. Underneath the jeep, inside and in the chassis, you cannot see where he extended it. It looks factory. Deadly job done. You can see where the fiberglass broke away around the window. We got that all patched up now with fiber reinforced bondo. and fiberglass matt. Seems much stronger now that it's repaired. He got the jeep for a decent price considering the quality of the build. It has RCV axles, OME lift, Warn 8000 with synthetic rope, Rough country LCA's front and rear, Those are very stout but I don't like the "johnny joint" endlinks.
 

jscherb

Expedition Leader
I've installed my RTT to open off the back and off the side, but never this way:



I'm trying to come up with reasons to install it to open over the front like that and haven't come up with any other than it reduces the overall footprint of the vehicle + RTT when set up. Anyone have a reason this would be a better setup than off the side or the back?
 

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GlennA

Adventurer
I've installed my RTT to open off the back and off the side, but never this way:



I'm trying to come up with reasons to install it to open over the front like that and haven't come up with any other than it reduces the overall footprint of the vehicle + RTT when set up. Anyone have a reason this would be a better setup than off the side or the back?
The ladder is always on a firm level surface.
 
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