KISS Remote Camping List

Pacific Northwest yetti

Expedition Medic
I have a relatively " simple system"

First everything is in Modular clear totes

One has cooking supplies, pots, pans, etc Kitchen- including a week of dehydrated meals, matches, foil,

One has the camp stove and propane

I have others, where each has a sleeping bag, pad, w/ hamock and bed roll. ( my main one)

And a few others that are just a sleeping bag and pad. This keeps them clean, organized and in an unpacked form for maximum life.

At its simplest I just grab the kitchen box, and stove. W/ how many bed systems i need. Fill the water jug up, and the cooler.

They can be opened up w/ the sleeping bags placed in stuff/ compression sacks where I can fit 4 to a box.

They all nest and stack I added some door seal foam to make a good seal. Poor mans Pelican. The system is easy adapted for each journey and everything stays packed and stocked in the totes.

https://smile.amazon.com/Sterilite-Gal-Stacker-Box-Case/dp/B07KFN8L8T/ref=sr_1_fkmr0_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1547068880&sr=8-2-fkmr0&keywords=Sterilite+19+Gallon+Stacker+Tote,+clear

The truck always has recovery gear, and tools, and on board air. Since I work as a contract medic, a full Med kit as well.
 

FlipperFla

Active member
Flipper, even when I take less stuff, I don't use 25-50% of it. But certain emergency gear needs to be on board because it's the one time you need it that makes carrying it responsible.[/QUOT. I agree, we still take all the emergency gear and tools. I also have to cut down on the food, it seems we usually only use half of what we take!
 

Happy Joe

Apprentice Geezer
...Ahhh, for the simple days...
started out backpacking but as I got older I found that comfort is worth more than a few complications...
DSCF0313.JPGDSCF0306.JPG

Sorry no list, just a pile-O-stuff.
...every couple of trips I go through the gear to find out what is unneeded; after returning home if some thing was needed but not there, it is procured.
each winter (and all summer, really) I look for ways to improve the camping setup... (tent stake grommets will be added to the ground tarp next trip)....
... need to consolidate and repack the cook kit soon (good January project)...

Enjoy!
 
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chand-o

New member
I keep going through my kit to try make it easier next time. What I do bare in mind is "pack smarter, not necessarily lighter". With that I try to find a better way of carrying something I might need rather than simply ejecting it and later wishing I hadn't.
 

robert

Expedition Leader
I have an Excel spreadsheet checklist from my VW days; I originally got it from a another bus club member then modified it for my own use. It looks like a huge list, and it technically is, but it's pretty thorough down to articles of clothing, forks and spoons, spare fuses, etc. Most of the actual camping stuff, tools, etc, just lived in the bus so it wasn't like I had to load it every time. It also had sport specific groups on it as well such as mountain biking, kayaking, etc.

I've modified it for my trucks but I don't use it much since I also leave some basic stuff in the back.
 

Correus

Adventurer
While I do try to keep everything basic and simple my main issue is that I collect vintage and antique camping and campaign items! LOL
 

tatanka48

Active member
...

Some of the passes were white knuckle drives especially going down Slumgullion Pass between Creede and Lake City you could smell the brakes burning on other vehicles.

... Pack lite.
if that little stretch of 149 drew a pucker you are glad you didn't go over Red Mtn Pass down into Ouray on 550 ;-)

T
 

FlipperFla

Active member
if that little stretch of 149 drew a pucker you are glad you didn't go over Red Mtn Pass down into Ouray on 550 ;-)

T
Did that one last year but going up, came up from Durango on the San Juan Skyway to Telluride then to Ridgway on to Ouray then S on 550. Your right about that drive! Pretty scary sh*t when your a flatlander from Florida. lol
 

dman93

Adventurer
This has been interesting reading, thanks for all the comments. In my opinion simple and light/minimalist aren’t necessarily the same. When I try to pare down too much, sometimes it seems more complicated. For example, everything in one bag isn’t necessarily simpler than a few extra boxes with things more organized. But generally, the less stuff the better. However, I’m finding that the stuff I don’t use often (or at all) may be the life-or-death stuff I’ll need someday, such as extra water, first aid kit, fire extinguisher, tire chains, recovery gear, tools, etc. it feels like that stuff takes as much room as my tent, food, cooking gear etc. When my DCSB Tacoma seems too small, I have to remind myself that I took a 3 month camping trip on my dual sport thumper 30 years ago, or went on backpacking trips with 4 guys in an old Honda Civic hatchback.
 

Grump E-Vet

Active member
@luk4mud I will second what @Correus said about bringing and least a sidearm and trauma kit. Depending on the wildlife in your area and also sometimes depending on if you are liable to run into 2-legged predators. Not to be all tinfoil hat but I know in some areas of the SW that is becoming more of a problem in remote areas.

If not a pistol then at least a shotgun or .22 LR rifle (the 10/22 takedowns are ideal). Also in the better to have it and never use it category the trauma kit. At the minimum you need a small blood loss kit (tourniquets) and trauma dressings (Israelis)\4x4 guaze, Kerlix and 1”/3” silk tape. Plus things for basic splinting so cravats and ace wraps that you could use with things like sticks or tent poles if needed. Also basic problem stuff like bandaids, some kind of antibiotic ointment (Neosporin\Bacitracin), hydrocortisone cream, preventive health stuff bug spray\sunscreen\iodine tablets if needed. For OTC oral meds it is good to have Tylenol, Ibuprofen, Immodium, Tums and Benadryl.

Besides the flare gun Correus mentioned I would add something reflective and bright to mark an LZ if needed for a major emergency like a lightweight roll up VS-17 panel plus chemlights (glow sticks) for night. Then and this is easier when camping with immediate family make sure anyone on oral meds has enough of a supply for the trip plus a couple days. Anyone that has a rescuer inhaler or epi pen should keep it on them or in reach and other people should know where it is located. Also if anyone has had a prior heat or cold weather injury other people should know in advance.

Then just basic emergency planning best practices if you will have access to vehicles make sure there is a physical paper copy of a strip map of an evacuation route to either an ER or back to pavement if you would be meeting a ground ambulance in route. Then copy insurance cards and IDs for everyone if you can then write any meds, allergies or pertinent medical history and PCP information on that. Then put them all individually into ziplocks and make sure you have a pen and sharpie. If something happens the paper is also a good place to document the time any meds were given or heaven forbid a tourniquet was applied (dressings and tourniquets should always have a time written in an emergency with the sharpie as well). In an emergency after you are done documenting on the paper put it back in the bag and tape it on all four sides to the patient somewhere in a prominent place.

I get this may be considered overkill by some but it is advice really offered in the best spirit of trying to help and based off over 20 years of doing field medicine. Have a fun, safe and memorable trip!
 

Correus

Adventurer
@luk4mudI know in some areas of the SW that is becoming more of a problem in remote areas.

Besides the flare gun Correus mentioned I would add something reflective and bright to mark an LZ if needed for a major emergency like a lightweight roll up VS-17 panel plus chemlights (glow sticks) for night.
D'oh!!! Never even thought about the need for a possible LZ and I've seen it happen! Good catch.

The two legged kind are getting bad in SE Kansas as well. Was traveling through a remote are, stopped in a town of about 500, met a sheriff's deputy and got to talking. He had a row of handcuffs ready, a riot shotgun and a black rifle all in cab of his truck. He said the meth heads have gotten so bad they've had to up their fire power. They even post notices at camping, hunting and fishing areas.
 

J!m

Active member
Some really, really god advise here. OP, take heed!

I will add one thing that can do wonders. I try to have all that I need but in as few physical items as possible. So I try to go for multiple purpose wherever I can, as long as I don’t sacrifice reliability. Tarps for groundcloth can also double for signaling- waving a 5x5 silver tarp should be seen during the day at least. Fires work well at night- wet/green evergreen branches will smoke well for day signals etc.

So not to get to far into the weeds with specifics, think about each item you intend to carry. Some “single purpose “ items are just that, but really clever planning and use can condense your pack load significantly.
 

tatanka48

Active member
Some really, really god advise here. OP, take heed!

I will add one thing that can do wonders. I try to have all that I need but in as few physical items as possible. So I try to go for multiple purpose wherever I can, as long as I don’t sacrifice reliability. Tarps for groundcloth can also double for signaling- waving a 5x5 silver tarp should be seen during the day at least. Fires work well at night- wet/green evergreen branches will smoke well for day signals etc.

So not to get to far into the weeds with specifics, think about each item you intend to carry. Some “single purpose “ items are just that, but really clever planning and use can condense your pack load significantly.
excellent target advice!

T
 
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