Kimberley Kampers USA

Agree that the plug will provide whatever the alternator puts out (based on specific wiring decisions). Probably badly asked by me. In this case, a very similar alternator, same engine same dc-dc, and same KK battery bank are involved, so I'm really just curious how much that charges the KK batteries under real world driving conditions.
 

wtraptor

New member
Which outside cooking set up did you choose? Our S3 is being built right now, and I am at the last chance to make any changes. I question the two power burners a little
I have the Cook Partner stove two burner option. I had a cook partner stove on my old trailer and it was great. Expert quality and hand crafted in Idaho. I use a Lodge case iron flat griddle instead of cooking on the grill grates.
 

wtraptor

New member
@wtraptor That's an awesome set up for traveling with kids! Do you know how much charge you are actually getting to the Kruiser batteries from the Anderson plug when you're traveling from one spot to the next? And did you leave everything stock on the Ford/3.5 (battery, alternator, etc)? Going to be adding an Anderson plug to my F150 before our Karavan shows up, but have no idea what that will actually provide.
My truck is stock electrical. Its a 2021 F150 and I have a 2kw Propower generator in the back of the bed. For the anderson plug I have a 4 gauge wired directly to the battery with a Blue Sea circuit breaker in the battery box. The cable in snaked in the frame to the back of the truck. My rear connection is an Anderson SB175 used to power a removable hitch mounted winch. I have a step down Anderson cable from SB 175 to grey SB50 to connect to the Kruiser. The Kruiser/Karavan will come with a grey SB50. The Enerdrive DC-DC charger can pull 40 amps but it was only pulling 30-32 amps. I felt that was pretty good.

With the Propower generator I was only able to charge the batteries and not charge and run anything else in the Kruiser. This generator has its own alternator. I was able to put in 130-150 amps. I did this a few times when boondocking to top off the batteries.

The highest I saw the rooftop solar was 20 amps on the best part of the day. Given that the panels are flat it doesn't get the best results. I have 200 watts portable solar that was pulling 10 amps for most of the day. The portable solar inputs to a MPPT in the Enerdrive DC-DC. It uses a RED SB50. The rooftop solar has its own MPPT. Hope this helps!
 
That's really useful, thanks for that! Surprised that the rooftop solar wasn't a little better than that, but there are a lot of factors that play into that, so maybe 30amps from all the solar options wasn't bad. Feels odd saying anything underwhelming about 30amps from solar, plenty of past camping trips where that would have been a game changer!

The propower was feeding the Kruiser shore power connection from your bed outlets while at camp? Have heard it's a little thirsty compared to a portable generator, but also really nice and quiet? Anyway, you have an awesome set up. Hope the whole family is enjoying it!
 
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wtraptor

New member
That's really useful, thanks for that! Surprised that the rooftop solar wasn't a little better than that, but there are a lot of factors that play into that, so maybe 30amps from all the solar options wasn't bad. Feels odd saying anything underwhelming about 30amps from solar, plenty of past camping trips where that would have been a game changer!

The propower was feeding the Kruiser shore power connection from your bed outlets while at camp? Have heard it's a little thirsty compared to a portable generator, but also really nice and quiet? Anyway, you have an awesome set up. Hope the whole family is enjoying it!
Propower was plugged into shore power. Used it every third day for about an hour, it nice not have to lug around a portable generator. I had two fans running most of the day, the built in fridge and a 12v fridge. Used about 5-7 amps/hr at base. Up to 10 with lights etc.
 

Romer

Adventurer
I was camped near Lake Dillon this past week with my Karavan. I have 280 watts of panels. I didnt connect the anderson plug because I have never needed vehicle power, the panels do a good job. I was 100% when we got to camp. Running the heater overnight along with the fridge I was at 90% in the morning on 300ah LI Batteries) and by the time I got back to camp early afternoon, I was back at 100%. Now I don't have AC and I don't use the microwave when off grid. I was out for 4 days and had the same result each day. So if it was cloudy, looks like my batteries could last a good part of the week. With sun, likely run out of water and diesel before I lose power
Screenshot 2022-07-29 090447.jpg
 

FordGuy1

Adventurer
My truck is stock electrical. Its a 2021 F150 and I have a 2kw Propower generator in the back of the bed. For the anderson plug I have a 4 gauge wired directly to the battery with a Blue Sea circuit breaker in the battery box. The cable in snaked in the frame to the back of the truck. My rear connection is an Anderson SB175 used to power a removable hitch mounted winch. I have a step down Anderson cable from SB 175 to grey SB50 to connect to the Kruiser. The Kruiser/Karavan will come with a grey SB50. The Enerdrive DC-DC charger can pull 40 amps but it was only pulling 30-32 amps. I felt that was pretty good.

With the Propower generator I was only able to charge the batteries and not charge and run anything else in the Kruiser. This generator has its own alternator. I was able to put in 130-150 amps. I did this a few times when boondocking to top off the batteries.

The highest I saw the rooftop solar was 20 amps on the best part of the day. Given that the panels are flat it doesn't get the best results. I have 200 watts portable solar that was pulling 10 amps for most of the day. The portable solar inputs to a MPPT in the Enerdrive DC-DC. It uses a RED SB50. The rooftop solar has its own MPPT. Hope this helps!
If you are gretting 30 amps from your truck to your trailer, that is about as good as it gets. You could install a upgraded alt, but I dont think its worth it. A DC power alt may get you 40ish to your trailer.
 

cmo5

Member
On our recent trip we were getting the full 40amps from the truck's Anderson plug to the trailer, but we have a F350 with dual alternators and plenty of juice so that may be the difference...
 

FordGuy1

Adventurer
On our recent trip we were getting the full 40amps from the truck's Anderson plug to the trailer, but we have a F350 with dual alternators and plenty of juice so that may be the difference...
That is a great set up for stock.
 
If you are following this thread and are interested in seeing all of the options available from Kimberley USA, you’ll have a great opportunity at Overland Expo Mountain West, August 26-28. I think for the first time, David Bates has arranged to have at T3, a S3 and an E3 Kruiser on display as well as a Karavan and a Kamper. The T3 is mine—the first to make it to the U.S. Come and see us!
 

goodol

Member
I have learned so much from the discussions here about Karaven and Kruiser, thank you so much friends. However 90K+ is a stretch for us, combining with a new tow vehicle. We are very interested in Kamper. Any friend could share your winter camping experience for nights with below freezing temp? Our kids love skiing (4y and 6y), and we look forward to winter adventures.
Thank you again!
 

FordGuy1

Adventurer
I have learned so much from the discussions here about Karaven and Kruiser, thank you so much friends. However 90K+ is a stretch for us, combining with a new tow vehicle. We are very interested in Kamper. Any friend could share your winter camping experience for nights with below freezing temp? Our kids love skiing (4y and 6y), and we look forward to winter adventures.
Thank you again!
When my wife and I started looking at campers we were totally not going to pay 145k, it just seemed to be ridiculous for a trailer. Then we started to look at what was available in the us. The quality and what we wanted was not made in the US. I came to the conclusion that I was not going to buy something I did not want, and would not give us what we wanted. The more we looked, the more that the price was palatable. If I were to buy a equal van with these features, I would spend 200k, and that would still left me with a van. With this set up, I can daily drive the tow vehicle, I can set up camp and have a capable off road truck to explore, I can tow my jeep when I want ETC. I think that in the long run, Crying once, and not every-time I look at what I bought is worth it.
 

eatSleepWoof

Do it for the 'gram
When my wife and I started looking at campers we were totally not going to pay 145k, it just seemed to be ridiculous for a trailer. Then we started to look at what was available in the us. The quality and what we wanted was not made in the US. I came to the conclusion that I was not going to buy something I did not want, and would not give us what we wanted. The more we looked, the more that the price was palatable. If I were to buy a equal van with these features, I would spend 200k, and that would still left me with a van. With this set up, I can daily drive the tow vehicle, I can set up camp and have a capable off road truck to explore, I can tow my jeep when I want ETC. I think that in the long run, Crying once, and not every-time I look at what I bought is worth it.
Furthermore, the Kimberley will still be alive and likely perfectly fine 25 years from now. How many US-made trailers can make that claim?

There's a reason many trailer-campgrounds refuse entry to trailers older than 10/15/20 years... many of them simply get abandoned.

In the long-term, buying quality typically ends up being the more economical option, too. The difficulty is the initial, up front cost.

I used to buy a new pair of $100 boots every autumn, and by spring time each pair was torn up, leaking, and on its way to the landfill. Some years back I ponied up triple that price for a pair of quality boots, and they still look and wear like they're brand new two winters later. Pretty sure they'll last an easy 10 years. The Kimberley trailers should be just like that, too.
 

Romer

Adventurer
Specifically on the Kamper, I use to have a 2002 Kimberley Kamper. When I sold it in 2015, it still looked brand new. I would stay be happy with the Kamper. I took the Opportunity to upgrade direct from the factory (Before USA dealer) when the AUD to USD was at a sweet spot giving me a great deal.

I didn't camp in the winter, but did some days close to freezing and with a heater, the Kamper was more than warm, enough

The Kamper is lighter, easier to tow, easier to store and you can put stuff on the rack on top. By itself, it sets up in a couple of minutes. It is when you add the awning that you need to add time. I understand there is a quick awning that wasn't an option on mine

I hope that helps
 

Speedkills

Member
I wish they would make a hard side bathroom version of the Kamper. It's the only thing stopping me from pulling the trigger, no way I can talk my wife into paying that much and having just a shower curtain separating the bathroom from the rest of the trailer.
 

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