Kenworth K270/K370 and Peterbilt Model 200 4x4 Conversion and Misc Questions

mog

Kodiak Wrangler
With shock technology coming along, I'm wondering when/if on-the-fly adjustable shocks will become a reality and whether it will be something that improves ride quality and varied terrain of expo sized vehicles.
I can not speak for 'large vehicles', but I have friends that have Polaris RZRs with the active suspension and they rave that it is pure magic. It adjusts something like 100 per second and even sets up for future terrain. Such as when they go over a jump, it, of course, knows it is going to 'land' so increases the compression, and the instance it makes contact, decreased the setting for a smooth landing.
Pretty impressive. DYNAMIX, ACTIVE SUSPENSION
 

waveslider

Outdoorsman
Yeah, that’s the kind of thing I’m talking about. Like many auto advancements, a lot of it comes out of the racing world.

I don’t know why it wouldn’t work on larger trucks. Wouldn’t even need to be nearly as sensitive.

I wonder if trophy trucks run them.
 
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quickfarms

Adventurer
My personal experience is that the CDL does help and eliminate a lot of questions that my friends get asked and I do not get asked.

My big rig cruises at 58 and you just sit back and enjoy the scenery.

My latest creation will hit the governor at triple digits. I have had it up to 75 and that’s not relaxing. It handles beautifully at about 65.
 

TheFlyHighKid

New member
Not sure driving a bare 2wd chassis is going to tell you much since without any weight it is not going to ride very well and the front suspension and tires will be nothing like the final build.

Maybe you could take a GXV for a test drive at GXV if they have one available.

The 4wd conversion has gone through several phases. Ours was the 3rd one delivered and has had several suspension upgrades and also new seats to replace the OEM ones. Not sure about changes in the last two years. Ours had the following upgrades as they became available: King Shocks, front airbags, and added leaf to front springs. Along with the seat upgrades this made the ride very acceptable on the highway and off the highway. We also have the manual front hub locks which were not available on the first builds.
Thanks! I'm not only interested in road manners, but also in cab decibels. I spend a lot of time in commercial type rigs that are just too damned loud to be my personal vehicle. I don't want to have to wear a headset and communicate with my passengers via mic:) I'm hoping that you all find, and I will find, that some judicious use of sound matting, thinsulate, foam, etc under and inside the cab can manage that issue.
 

TheFlyHighKid

New member
Regarding CDL: nobody nowhere has actually asked for my CDL. But a CDL is definitely legally required for >7.5 metric tons for UK, EU, Australia, etc. RVs included.
Regarding “”King shocks” in Montrose Colorado: stay away!!!! They’re totally incompetent. Fortunately, I think they went out of business. I refer to “Road King”, definitely not King Shocks, the mfg of off-road racing and small 4x4 shocks. They aren’t incompetent; they just don’t respond well to inquiries about their truck shocks.
I think Road King just stole the name of the more legitimate company. I got burned by them.
Lame:(
 

gregmchugh

Observer
Thanks! I'm not only interested in road manners, but also in cab decibels. I spend a lot of time in commercial type rigs that are just too damned loud to be my personal vehicle. I don't want to have to wear a headset and communicate with my passengers via mic:) I'm hoping that you all find, and I will find, that some judicious use of sound matting, thinsulate, foam, etc under and inside the cab can manage that issue.
Some of the GXV Kenworth owners have done that, maybe they will provide some info on the results...
 

waveslider

Outdoorsman
By far, the sound deadening and insulation cab project was the single most impactful project I’ve done to the Kenworth.

It was a decent sound project but truly a game changer in the insulation dept.
 
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