Jeep Gladiator Build Thread - 18 months around Australia with The Road Chose Me

Dan Grec

Expedition Leader
Hi all,

Over the next 12-18 months I plan to drive the most remote roads on the planet, which means I have to carry more fuel.
I'm installing an auxiliary tank from "The Long Ranger", so I'll have a combined capacity of 153L or just over 40 gallons.
This should result in a range of around 700-800 miles (around 1200km), which I'm sure will be a game changer.

How exactly an aux tank is connected to the existing systems is an art in itself - you have to consider how it will be filled, how it will be transferred and used, keeping the whole emissions system legal and not reducing the break over angle. On top of all that, I want a tank that requires no exhaust modifications to keep costs down and so I can install it myself at home.

In this video I through all the features and factors I considered before choosing the Aux tank that I have.


Let me know if you have any questions, I'm happy to help if I can

-Dan
 

Dan Grec

Expedition Leader
Hi All,

Dad and I completed the install of the 70L (18.5Gal) Auxiliary tank into the Gladiator.
Now I have a total fuel capacity of 155L / 42 Gal, which feels like a huge level up on my previous vehicles.
It's so nice not to mess with jerry cans, funnels or siphon hoses - no stinky gas on my hands and it's all stored so low down and centered between the two axles.

In my new video I show the whole install process, then fill it up and transfer the fuel across into the main tank, showing how all of that works.
As a bonus, it turns out the tank is even bigger than advertised!

Using just hand tools in Dad's garage we completed the install without any problems, so you can too!


-Dan
 

Flintlock

New member
Hi Dan, I watched your first Long ranger video (and most of your videos TBH), but may have missed it: how would you compare the Long Ranger to the AEV Fuel Caddy? If you were doing a Wrangler build again, which one do you think you’d go with?
 

Dan Grec

Expedition Leader
Hi Dan, I watched your first Long ranger video (and most of your videos TBH), but may have missed it: how would you compare the Long Ranger to the AEV Fuel Caddy? If you were doing a Wrangler build again, which one do you think you’d go with?
They both have pros and cons, and they're good at different things.

The AEV fuel caddy is WAAAAAY cheaper, easier to install and is a simple way to add 10gal of fuel. It's also easy to remove and put on a different vehicle or sell.

The Long Ranger tank is WAAAY more capacity, you don't have to mess with the siphon hose and it's super, super simple to fill and use.

The choice depends entirely on where I'm going and budget. Do I NEED the 19 gal extra, or is 10 enough.. therefore saving $1500. ?

Where are you going?

-Dan
 

Dan Grec

Expedition Leader
Hi All,

For a shakedown trip of the new Jeep I set out to explore Grampians National Park, getting out hiking, wild camping and exploring all the remote corners of the park.
I'm super excited to be on the road again, and in some ways it feels a lot like I'm still in Africa - sleeping and cooking and camping in and around the Jeep all feels so familiar.

Roll on new Jeep Adventures!!

-Dan
 

greg.potter

Adventurer
They both have pros and cons, and they're good at different things.

The AEV fuel caddy is WAAAAAY cheaper, easier to install and is a simple way to add 10gal of fuel. It's also easy to remove and put on a different vehicle or sell.

The Long Ranger tank is WAAAY more capacity, you don't have to mess with the siphon hose and it's super, super simple to fill and use.

The choice depends entirely on where I'm going and budget. Do I NEED the 19 gal extra, or is 10 enough.. therefore saving $1500. ?

Where are you going?

-Dan
There is also the issue of center of gravity and weight behind the rear axle. The Long Ranger is a win in both of those departments ...... but not so much is the cost department, especially in North America!

I looked at the Long Ranger before I bought an AEV fuel caddy. I simply couldn't justify it as there were no dealers in NA at the time - shipping was as much or more than the tank itself. It's better now that there is a dealer in NA. It would be nice to get that weight off of my tire carrier ......

This train of thought is going to cost me money ......
 
Last edited:

Dan Grec

Expedition Leader
Hi all,

What do you think is the most essential feature on an overland vehicle?
After 5 years and 100,000 miles through 56 countries, I feel very strongly it is living space.
Where you hangout when its pouring rain, when the bugs are bad or when you just want some down time will have a bigger impact on your enjoyment than anything else.

In this video I talk through what I've done with my past vehicles, and what I'm doing on my Gladiator to get living space.

-Dan
 

Dan Grec

Expedition Leader
Hi all,

For my South-American adventure the Southern tip of the continent was the end point of the expedition.
For my African adventure the Southern tip of the continent was the mid point of the expedition.
Now in Australia the Southern tip of the continent is the start point!

In my latest adventure I set out hiking in Wilsons Prom National Park, reaching the Southern tip of mainland Australia to kick-off my Australian adventure the right way!


-Dan
 

Dan Grec

Expedition Leader
Hi Everyone,

I've driven way over to the South-East corner of Victoria, a place I've never been before.
With a huge storm coming in I got a good chance to really put the new batwing awning to the test, and get the Jeep dirty in some deep-enough-to-make-you-squirm mud puddles.

I'm working hard on my filming, editing, music choice and pacing, and I really want to document this adventure on YouTube better than I ever have before.
I'd love to hear any and all feedback on this video - improving is the goal!


-Dan
 

clydeps

Member
Just out of curiosity I've heard that Australia is very locked down. Is that the case? If so how is that impacting your travel plans?
Australia is not locked down (various states have had varying degrees of lockdown but that's all gone at least for the vaccinated) but there have been and still are some state border closures (or effectively closures due to quarantine requirements.)

The border closures are being unwound as vaccination rates are now very high - 92% of adults double-dosed in my state. The major remaining barriers are into Queensland and Western Australia, both of which were very successful at suppressing Covid, but are now the laggards in vaccination rate so their authorities are terrified of letting Covid in. Qld is due to open to vaccinated travellers on Dec 17.

Interstate travel has certainly been difficult for the last 6 months. 2022 will hopefully be a lot better - unless Omicron is vaccine resistant!
 

Dan Grec

Expedition Leader
Hi all,

For my latest adventure I'm out exploring Big & Little Desert National Parks, learning how to drive my Gladiator in deep sand in preparation for the huge deserts I plan to cross later in the journey.

I've never had an automatic before, so it's a learning process to figure out the right combination of settings, speed and gear.
It's nice not to worry about the clutch getting it off the line in the sand, though it strange not to be in control of the gear once I'm actually climbing the dune.
Manual mode is great, though I was surprised it holds the gear I've chosen and won't go lower, so it's up to me to bump it down gears before it starts to bog in the sand.

Clearly, I need to air down more (I was at 19psi), but this was more about learning about the Gladiator than it was about getting to the top.

In the adventure video I tackle sand dunes & water, find remote and isolated campsites and even have a few great animal encounters!


-Dan
 

nwoods

Expedition Leader
@Dan Grec - what is the functional purpose of the light bar down so low integrated in your bumper? Does it throw very far forward?
1638567031288.png
 
Top