Jacks for expedition vehicles

Bayou Boy

Adventurer
Be careful with the Safe Jack it can be a challenge if you need to change a flat as it will not fit under the axle.
You've posted this before and it's just not an issue. If you can't figure out how to dig a small hole for the jack or pull the flat tire forward onto a rock to make room, what are you doing offroad?

That factory jack is junk compared to any 6 ton or larger bottle jack. Also, we are talking about larger than 1-ton trucks here anyway.
 

LandCruiserPhil

Expedition Leader
You've posted this before and it's just not an issue. If you can't figure out how to dig a small hole for the jack or pull the flat tire forward onto a rock to make room, what are you doing offroad?

That factory jack is junk compared to any 6 ton or larger bottle jack. Also, we are talking about larger than 1-ton trucks here anyway.
I understand your point but you are not always offroad and its not always you when a jack is needed. If it your wife or you are on tarmac your solution is useless. The adapter was created by my wife because centering a post jack where the factory recommends is not the safest or the easiest for many. Im not the least concerned for my self as I can survive but when my wife/daughter is traveling to Mexico as she frequently does I want to provide her with something she is comfortable with that works and is safe. Factory mechanical jack ( at least with Toyota) is an extremely reliable jack. Hate on the adapter all you want but it makes jacking safer and easier even for someone like you that feels they have it all figured out, it a safety product that works for a fraction of the cost of a Safe Jack.
 

Bayou Boy

Adventurer
I understand your point but you are not always offroad and its not always you when a jack is needed. If it your wife or you are on tarmac your solution is useless. The adapter was created by my wife because centering a post jack where the factory recommends is not the safest or the easiest for many. Im not the least concerned for my self as I can survive but when my wife/daughter is traveling to Mexico as she frequently does I want to provide her with something she is comfortable with that works and is safe. Factory mechanical jack ( at least with Toyota) is an extremely reliable jack. Hate on the adapter all you want but it makes jacking safer and easier even for someone like you that feels they have it all figured out, it a safety product that works for a fraction of the cost of a Safe Jack.
Understood. That makes sense.

BTW I'm not hating on your adapter and I'd probably have gone that route if I drove a Tacoma rather than my 9000# Ram 3500. My comments were merely reflecting on your constant hate of the SafeJack that is significantly more capable than your solution. Your solution is a non-starter on an HD truck or the 15k pound and up trucks that are being talked about in this thread. This is the Earthcruiser, Earthroamer, GEV forum FWIW and comments about a Toyota factory jack adapter are, at best, random noise in this thread.
 

grizzlyj

Adventurer
Those are way too big and used for stuff like the recovery shown above. Don't need that to change a tire or to unstuck a vehicle. I was suggesting something like this.

http://www.firstoutrescue.com/index.php/rescue-extrication/air-lifting-bags/matjack-low-pressure-air-bag-cushion/5-8-ton-low-pressure-air-bag.html
Yep, but they aren't big enough. You need two maybe for a level lift on the OP projected weight, and then how much safety factor does that come with? Add in a slope, or some wobble during lift to unequally load a pair? Maybe you need three?!? The ones I linked to were/are the only ones I've come across second hand that one would actually be up to the job of lifting a 9 ton axle. If you are lifting that much weight on a big squishy bag you won't perhaps be pushing on the axle to start with, it may push on the sump and steering gear etc, so I think the bigger the better to spread it out. But unless you buy new from a specialist for lots of cash those yellow ones were the only ones I could find, which packed up were indeed too big. As well as the flat one I mentioned before I did buy a pair from that same link that do 5 tons each, the storage bag for them both, the hose and the control box is nudging three feet diameter and maybe 10" deep.
 

whitenoise

Adventurer
Yep, but they aren't big enough. You need two maybe for a level lift on the OP projected weight, and then how much safety factor does that come with? Add in a slope, or some wobble during lift to unequally load a pair? Maybe you need three?!? The ones I linked to were/are the only ones I've come across second hand that one would actually be up to the job of lifting a 9 ton axle. If you are lifting that much weight on a big squishy bag you won't perhaps be pushing on the axle to start with, it may push on the sump and steering gear etc, so I think the bigger the better to spread it out. But unless you buy new from a specialist for lots of cash those yellow ones were the only ones I could find, which packed up were indeed too big. As well as the flat one I mentioned before I did buy a pair from that same link that do 5 tons each, the storage bag for them both, the hose and the control box is nudging three feet diameter and maybe 10" deep.
A 12k lb rated jack is big enough to lift a 7k lb axle OP is talking about under any type of surface condition. Going directly under the axle or control arm in case it's a IFS will provide the highest lift. Unless we're talking about a specific vehicle it's hard to know whether a particular Jack will work. But using bags meant to right a rolled truck or forklift to change a tire is, IMO, unnecessary.

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Ozrockrat

Expedition Leader
If you have onboard air (and with 7000 lbs at the rear axle you probably do) I would suggest an air over hydraulic jack. This allows you to position the jack and be out from under the vehicle when jacking it up. Sadly mine does not allow you to lower the Jack remotely.

I currently use one of these on my trucks with a 14000 lb rear axle weight. The only suggestion is if you buy from Hated Freight make sure you test it well straight away. I had 2 leak before this one.

https://m.harborfreight.com/12-ton-airhydraulic-bottle-jack-61382.html
 

Bayou Boy

Adventurer
If you have onboard air (and with 7000 lbs at the rear axle you probably do) I would suggest an air over hydraulic jack. This allows you to position the jack and be out from under the vehicle when jacking it up. Sadly mine does not allow you to lower the Jack remotely.

I currently use one of these on my trucks with a 14000 lb rear axle weight. The only suggestion is if you buy from Hated Freight make sure you test it well straight away. I had 2 leak before this one.

https://m.harborfreight.com/12-ton-airhydraulic-bottle-jack-61382.html
This is a great idea.
 

grizzlyj

Adventurer
A 12k lb rated jack is big enough to lift a 7k lb axle OP is talking about under any type of surface condition. Going directly under the axle or control arm in case it's a IFS will provide the highest lift. Unless we're talking about a specific vehicle it's hard to know whether a particular Jack will work. But using bags meant to right a rolled truck or forklift to change a tire is, IMO, unnecessary.

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Sorry, my brain is confusing two threads :( In my case I do have maybe 9 tons on the front axle, and the yellow bags I pictured are the only things without going new that would lift it with one bag. Yes too big but best second hand option I could find. And at that size I would think I might end up bending steering etc. But not really what the OP was asking. Sorry, I should pay more attention. I'll shut up now!
 

LandCruiserPhil

Expedition Leader
Understood. That makes sense.

BTW I'm not hating on your adapter and I'd probably have gone that route if I drove a Tacoma rather than my 9000# Ram 3500. My comments were merely reflecting on your constant hate of the SafeJack that is significantly more capable than your solution. Your solution is a non-starter on an HD truck or the 15k pound and up trucks that are being talked about in this thread. This is the Earthcruiser, Earthroamer, GEV forum FWIW and comments about a Toyota factory jack adapter are, at best, random noise in this thread.
No dislike of the Safe Jack just educating the limits and giving cost effective options.

Just for the big guys clear at 9.25" and 20 tons

20190128_163135.jpg

FWIW Safe jack max available is 6 tons

We make adapters to fit all post jacks from 1-1/4" to 2"

20190128_163457.jpg
 

whitenoise

Adventurer
@waveslider I think that's a slight mischaracterization. Phil is just a guy on a forum who helps us Land Cruiser guys solve problems using simple and thus cost-effective solutions. I doubt this is even a blip on Safe Jack's radar. Almost everything he sells, I doubt you could make yourself cheaper, and even he is unlikely to make much money off of. He's just a well-meaning enthusiast like (hopefully) most on this thread.

Disclaimer: I am a happy LCP customer :)

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jgaz

Adventurer
A buddy and I made a couple sets of these adaptors. Didn’t make them to sell, just something we put together for ourselves.

303DCE64-ABF8-4B2A-9DDF-9DEFC1710F55.jpeg

Yup, a shameless copy of a safe jack kit. However the origin of these adaptors was probably some farmer waaay before the Internet.
Have to say I’ve never had to use it to change a tire but I’ve used it many times as a third hand in the shop.
7D54A126-C9E3-4985-A223-D97820E0526A.jpeg

I’m using a better base plate now then the one shown in this picture.

IMHO, Phil’s adaptors are a good buy at his price point if you don’t have the equipment or skills to make your own.
 

Bayou Boy

Adventurer
For those of you that are making your own, I'd encourage you to get the little plastic spacer that Safejack sells to slip around the threads of the jack and take up that space. It makes a significant difference in turning the jack and cradle into one solid unit and it well worth sourcing.
 

jgaz

Adventurer
For those of you that are making your own, I'd encourage you to get the little plastic spacer that Safejack sells to slip around the threads of the jack and take up that space. It makes a significant difference in turning the jack and cradle into one solid unit and it well worth sourcing.
X2.
That spacer was a great addition to my kit.
The O ring on mine didn’t last very long but a couple wraps of brass wire took care of that little issue.
 
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