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Jackery 1000 Power Generator Overview

brycercampbell

New member
Hey guys, I've been using a Jackery solar panel for a while, gifted from a friend, and recently got another panel and a Jackery 1000 donated to me and thought I'd give a quick overview before I do a longterm review.

The main use-case for a setup like this is either for weekend camping or fulltime use. There are smaller and bigger units, but the 1000 is the sweet spot for "extending camping", light fulltime rigs, or if there's more than 1 person. A friend of mine runs a Dometic CFX35 on a Jackery 1000 for 3-4 days no problem, and I'm planning to replace my cooler with a similar fridge.

To the point, I'll start with the panels.
They're 100w panels and it takes around 8 hours depending on the sun, to fully charge the unit. But in my experience that's unnecessary. You can also charge it through a wall outlet or cigarette lighter to keep it juiced up. So charge it before you leave home, and if it's a short trip that might be all you need. But for longer trips, charge it when you drive, and if you stay put for a a few days, use the solar panels. Worth noting it could last you anywhere from a few days to a few weeks depending on you.

The panels are solid, the fabric or canvas material that surrounds them is, so far, relatively durable. This makes it easy to adjust the angle depending on the sun, they also have stands on the back. As for said fabric durability, I won't know until I know.. I'll address it in the main review as time goes on. But I got one panel in SLC halfway through my trip used from a friend, I used it to charge my phone often, and it doesn't have any wear. And I did not exactly baby it.
attachFull613690


As for the unit itself, there's not much to it. The panels connect through an included cord, it has multiple household outlets as well as USB and a cigarette style. It has a screen that displays battery level and other info. Again, simplicity is the main benefit. You don't have to think at all with these setups. A thought I had before was "how long does it last?" but that's not really a problem because of the different ways to charge it. How long are you going to go without a wall/cig outlet or the sun? Probably not more than the 3-4 days it takes to drain with a decent sized Dometic.

So that's great, but there are 2 main downsides.
1. a comparable DIY solar setup to mine would be a few hundred cheaper. The Jackery 1000 w/ 2 100w panels is $1500. For me, the convenience is probably worth the difference and peace of mind my truck won't catch fire. On that note, it's pretty much like a dual battery setup - except the battery is larger and mobile and can be charged not just by the alternator.

2. Battery durability. This is two separate issues.
2a. If something goes wrong, you can't splice a new part into the power unit itself (obviously solar panels can be easily replaced). But I haven't heard of anything going wrong with one of these, and I have heard good things about Jackery support in general. If something does happen I'll share my experience.
2b. Longterm degradation. Goalzeros/Jackerys/similar units are good for either 500 or 1000 full cycles before degradation (to 80% capacity). On a DIY setup, the standalone battleborn battery would be good for somewhere around 2000 cycles. Now, realistically, does this matter? Probably not, even if you travel for extended periods like myself. But it is worth noting.

I'm a heavy user, I do trips for months at a time, so I should be able to get a really good idea of this setup. But that will take time! If you have any questions let me know.

brycercampbell.com
 

john61ct

Adventurer
Opposite for me.

Knowing what you're doing is what keeps you safe

and gets you **much** better value than buying kit like that.

Solar panels never need be the same brand as anything else.

50¢ per watt is fair these days, $1/W is dear.

A top notch SC is around the same, and will charge your main House battery bank or Starter as well as your portable pack.
 

67cj5

Man On a Mission
Hey guys, I've been using a Jackery solar panel for a while, gifted from a friend, and recently got another panel and a Jackery 1000 donated to me and thought I'd give a quick overview before I do a longterm review.

The main use-case for a setup like this is either for weekend camping or fulltime use. There are smaller and bigger units, but the 1000 is the sweet spot for "extending camping", light fulltime rigs, or if there's more than 1 person. A friend of mine runs a Dometic CFX35 on a Jackery 1000 for 3-4 days no problem, and I'm planning to replace my cooler with a similar fridge.

To the point, I'll start with the panels.
They're 100w panels and it takes around 8 hours depending on the sun, to fully charge the unit. But in my experience that's unnecessary. You can also charge it through a wall outlet or cigarette lighter to keep it juiced up. So charge it before you leave home, and if it's a short trip that might be all you need. But for longer trips, charge it when you drive, and if you stay put for a a few days, use the solar panels. Worth noting it could last you anywhere from a few days to a few weeks depending on you.

The panels are solid, the fabric or canvas material that surrounds them is, so far, relatively durable. This makes it easy to adjust the angle depending on the sun, they also have stands on the back. As for said fabric durability, I won't know until I know.. I'll address it in the main review as time goes on. But I got one panel in SLC halfway through my trip used from a friend, I used it to charge my phone often, and it doesn't have any wear. And I did not exactly baby it.
attachFull613690


As for the unit itself, there's not much to it. The panels connect through an included cord, it has multiple household outlets as well as USB and a cigarette style. It has a screen that displays battery level and other info. Again, simplicity is the main benefit. You don't have to think at all with these setups. A thought I had before was "how long does it last?" but that's not really a problem because of the different ways to charge it. How long are you going to go without a wall/cig outlet or the sun? Probably not more than the 3-4 days it takes to drain with a decent sized Dometic.

So that's great, but there are 2 main downsides.
1. a comparable DIY solar setup to mine would be a few hundred cheaper. The Jackery 1000 w/ 2 100w panels is $1500. For me, the convenience is probably worth the difference and peace of mind my truck won't catch fire. On that note, it's pretty much like a dual battery setup - except the battery is larger and mobile and can be charged not just by the alternator.

2. Battery durability. This is two separate issues.
2a. If something goes wrong, you can't splice a new part into the power unit itself (obviously solar panels can be easily replaced). But I haven't heard of anything going wrong with one of these, and I have heard good things about Jackery support in general. If something does happen I'll share my experience.
2b. Longterm degradation. Goalzeros/Jackerys/similar units are good for either 500 or 1000 full cycles before degradation (to 80% capacity). On a DIY setup, the standalone battleborn battery would be good for somewhere around 2000 cycles. Now, realistically, does this matter? Probably not, even if you travel for extended periods like myself. But it is worth noting.

I'm a heavy user, I do trips for months at a time, so I should be able to get a really good idea of this setup. But that will take time! If you have any questions let me know.

brycercampbell.com
Those powered coolers chew about 4Ah a fridge will chew between 0.3Ah to around 2Ah +/- depending on the size or the ambient temp and then temp you have it set too so a Fridge is the better way to go.
 

67cj5

Man On a Mission
I am loving my jackery 1000. 4 days running my arb 50. Im using it on a week long road trip right now.
Cool well done mate, I found that it was better only to plug them in to your cigar socket when you are Driving that way the ARB will only chew about 5 or 10% over night and will be fully charged the next day in under and hour, (y)
 

OllieChristopher

Active member
For me, the convenience is probably worth the difference and peace of mind my truck won't catch fire.
Perhaps - would not hold my breath on that. Just ask Tesla and GM how that is going.
Far more gas vehicles have burned to the ground than electric. An electrical connection loose that is not being checked is no different than a loose fuel line.

I am loving my jackery 1000. 4 days running my arb 50. Im using it on a week long road trip right now.
I have the Jackery 300 solar generator and I'm really enjoying it. My wife and I use it every week to power my portable cooler when going up to the cabin.

50¢ per watt is fair these days, $1/W is dear.
I can see no possible way to build/purchase a solar generator for 50cents a watt that can compare to a Jackery 1000. If you take labor and reliability out of the equation then maybe. Just the Panasonic 18650 Li-ion battery bank alone is going to cost over 200 bucks. Add in the BMS, solar controller, inverter, case, wiring, solar panels, etc and now you are well north of 500 bucks. Add in a reasonable 50.00 per hour (electrician cost) labor and 10 hours. Now you're at over 1,000 bucks.

Believe me I thought about getting all the supplies and building my own 100AH portable solar generator. For quality parts ,wiring , and batteries (that surpass Jackery's) you are not going to get even close in price or portability as the ready to go solar generators.

I am not meaning to offend those that have built their own from cheap parts pieced together. It's not my style to cobble or mickey mouse for a permanent or portable unit that is part of my camping setup.
 

brycercampbell

New member
john61ct was referring to the cost of the solar panels.
There are plenty of other options for panels. In the future, especially with a fridge, I will buy a panel to mount to the tent or roof of my truck. But the Jackery panels serve a purpose for sure, convenience of buying everything at once, no adapters, etc. I think there is a happy medium between complete DIY and complete prefab setup.
 
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