It's Bronc o clock

plainjaneFJC

Goofball
7-7500k. If you use an app like Torque you, when you start climbing a steep grade, can watch the boost rise, then the engine temp rise, and then the tranny. They never got close to being an issue, but they will rise quickly. Boost = heat and the 2.7 loves to spool those little turbos.

Since part of the OEM tranny cooler runs through the radiator, it picks up the engine heat and transfers it to the tranny...which is why I'm swapping to the massive 6.0 powerstroke tranny cooler and by passing the radiator completly.
I probably will never tow over 5k with mine, and in Oklahoma we don't have many hills so I should be good! Thanks!
 

85_Ranger4x4

Well-known member
Since part of the OEM tranny cooler runs through the radiator, it picks up the engine heat and transfers it to the tranny...which is why I'm swapping to the massive 6.0 powerstroke tranny cooler and by passing the radiator completly.
The flipside is on a cold climate it helps the transmission warm up faster.

And liquid to liquid transfers heat much more efficiently than liquid to air as far as cooling the transmission.

IMO the only problem with the in radiator coolers is when they start mixing fluids which is pretty uncommon, I wouldn't bother deleting one altogether (add bigger remote cooler(s))
 

Todd n Natalie

Observer
What kind of weight have you towed? I have only towed about 3500, and didn't notice any heat issues.
7-7500k. If you use an app like Torque you, when you start climbing a steep grade, can watch the boost rise, then the engine temp rise, and then the tranny. They never got close to being an issue, but they will rise quickly. Boost = heat and the 2.7 loves to spool those little turbos.

Since part of the OEM tranny cooler runs through the radiator, it picks up the engine heat and transfers it to the tranny...which is why I'm swapping to the massive 6.0 powerstroke tranny cooler and by passing the radiator completly.
A guy I know ran into this issue with a 3.5 towing up a long steep grade in the BC mountains. Truck had 30,000 kms on it and went into limp mode. I believe the trailer was approx 5,000 - 6,000 lbs. Once the truck cooled down, it was fine.
 

Jnich77

Director of Adventure Management Operations
A guy I know ran into this issue with a 3.5 towing up a long steep grade in the BC mountains. Truck had 30,000 kms on it and went into limp mode. I believe the trailer was approx 5,000 - 6,000 lbs. Once the truck cooled down, it was fine.
The problem with either EcoBoost is that they don't struggle or strain while towing, unlike a NA motor they give you no real indication that they are working hard. They also have zero problem pulling their max tow rating, up a mountain, at the speed limit. They just spool the turbos and make more power...and heat.
 

Jnich77

Director of Adventure Management Operations
The flipside is on a cold climate it helps the transmission warm up faster.

And liquid to liquid transfers heat much more efficiently than liquid to air as far as cooling the transmission.

IMO the only problem with the in radiator coolers is when they start mixing fluids which is pretty uncommon, I wouldn't bother deleting one altogether (add bigger remote cooler(s))

Fortunately, living in Central Fl the cold is not much of a worry for me...haha.

Also, the tranny has a thermostat and doesn't start sending fluid to the cooler until it reaches ~190°. Interestingly, even in 100° temps it takes 15-20 miles for it to hit that temp if I'm not towing.


This is basicailly what I am going for. I tow a lot in stop and go traffic, in the summer, in Florida. While my tranny doesn't over heat, it does get warm.
FB_IMG_1595520460899.jpg
 

Todd n Natalie

Observer
The problem with either EcoBoost is that they don't struggle or strain while towing, unlike a NA motor they give you no real indication that they are working hard. They also have zero problem pulling their max tow rating, up a mountain, at the speed limit. They just spool the turbos and make more power...and heat.
Yes. I believe he told me it was the turbos that over heated? I seem to recall him saying he got a message about it on his dash as the truck went into limp mode.
 

2Jeeps&PatriotX1

Active member
I tow quite frequently out here in CO (5400-12000’ elevations) with my 3.5EB/10speed and my 3500lb camper. Never seen my trans temp higher than 214 degrees or engine temp higher than 221 towing at the speed limit and mid 90s out. My f150 is a ‘17 supercrew w/ 6” lift and 35” MT tires for reference.


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Todd n Natalie

Observer
I tow quite frequently out here in CO (5400-12000’ elevations) with my 3.5EB/10speed and my 3500lb camper. Never seen my trans temp higher than 214 degrees or engine temp higher than 221 towing at the speed limit and mid 90s out. My f150 is a ‘17 supercrew w/ 6” lift and 35” MT tires for reference.


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Just out of curisosity, is the camper you reference the Patriot camper in your sig?

I towed a 3,500 lbs pop up with my truck and a 5,000 lbs 23' hard wall travel trailer. There was a huge difference in towing those two trailers.

Never knew the pop up was there. So much less wind resistance.
 

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2Jeeps&PatriotX1

Active member
Just out of curisosity, is the camper you reference the Patriot camper in your sig?

I towed a 3,500 lbs pop up with my truck and a 5,000 lbs 23' hard wall travel trailer. There was a huge difference in towing those two trailers.

Never knew the pop up was there. So much less wind resistance.
Correct, yes I forgot to mention that my camper wasn’t a tall camper and also had a low center of gravity. From ground to top of the canvas cover when hooked to my tow vehicle, its only 6.5’ tall. Towing it behind the grand cherokee is still hard to tell its back there until you climb elevation and the 3.6 has to work so hard, much harder than the previous ecodiesel had to.


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2Jeeps&PatriotX1

Active member
Now there is the 64 million dollar question!
Another reason why Jeep owners should be glad that Jeep now has more competition and Ford came out swinging. Hopefully will make FCA get theirs heads out of their a**. Things like this, mirrors that a actually stay put when you remove the doors, and the list goes on.


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roving1

Well-known member
Another reason why Jeep owners should be glad that Jeep now has more competition and Ford came out swinging. Hopefully will make FCA get theirs heads out of their a**. Things like this, mirrors that a actually stay put when you remove the doors, and the list goes on.


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The funny thing is Jeep probably will start doing this and then Ursa Minor will have a 3 year backlog until they can make them all. Should probably be afraid we get what we wish for on this subject lol.
 

javajoe79

Fabricator
The flipside is on a cold climate it helps the transmission warm up faster.

And liquid to liquid transfers heat much more efficiently than liquid to air as far as cooling the transmission.

IMO the only problem with the in radiator coolers is when they start mixing fluids which is pretty uncommon, I wouldn't bother deleting one altogether (add bigger remote cooler(s))
Agreed. The transmission could easily be hotter than the radiator. I always add a transmission cooler after the built in exchanger in the radiator.
 
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