It's Bronc o clock

javajoe79

Fabricator
What you said isn't untrue but it's still funny that the tow rating is the same for a 20 year old 4 banger Taco using the bumper ball. 🤔 It still seems like the tow rating of the Bronco should be 4500-5000 at least for the 4 door auto. Sooooo many things can tow that amount that are not anything special.
The Bronco can surely tow that much. I believe it’s like I said, Ford doesn’t care to push the limit.
 

RoyJ

Adventurer
But they may not have figured it out enough for the diesel gladiator with the significant decrease in tow rating. Obviously there is a weight difference of the engine but not 1600lbs worth.


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I believe cooling is the exact reason the diesel Gladiator tow less, not power or weight (same engine tows more in heavier Ram).

The 3.6 NA gasser is right on the cooling limit, with the highest power brushless fan they have. With a diesel, you now have an intercooler, so won't keep up pulling the same weight. That's why I wonder if the Bronco has the same limitation.
 

RoyJ

Adventurer
everything new Ford that I've seen has a PWM electric fan on it. The modern brushless PWM fans are extremely powerful and quiet when not at full speed. If the ranger has a mechanical fan though I'd guess the Bronco would too. Typically engine driven fans move more air but not with the modern E fans these days. The intercooler heat soaking would be a different issue. At speed, a fan doesn't do much.
I'm huge fan (sorry...) of brushless fans. They've gotten so good Prevost is using them on 500hp, 54,000 lbs motor coaches. I'm retro-fitting one onto my 2014 Hemi 1500.

That's why I'm surprised the Ranger doesn't use one. It does use a PWM controlled e-clutch, where the ECU can command full lockup anytime it wants.

85_Ranger's explanation makes sense - the 2.3 Ecoboost is an afterthought for the American market; the mechanical fan may be originally designed for diesels.
 

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T-Willy

Well-known member
The availability of the Ursa Minor pop top from the dealership is really fantastic. It's almost as if Ford reads the forums.

"Ursa Minor works with Ford dealerships nationwide, allowing the B30 to be included with vehicle purchase and financing."

 

billiebob

My Uncle drove a government issued Jeep in Europe
Just saying you could have say two 4.0 trucks with the same everything but transmission and one would have drastically different ratings than the other.

Yeah, from different ends of the spectrum things change a lot.



If you buy a little 300k mile 2wd 4cyl standard cab shortbox ex Napa ranger for overlanding... you kinda deserve what you get lol.
But if you get it for under $500 you can rebuild everything to new for less than a 20 year old SUV, and you'll end up with a new truck.
 
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Jnich77

Director of Adventure Management Operations
The 2.7 in my F150 makes a looot of heat when it's towing... It has a larger grill opening, larger bumper opening, a larger radiator, and more air space under the hood when compared to the Bronco. I can absolutely understand why Ford would have to take engine heat into consideration when setting a tow rating.
 

RoyJ

Adventurer
Doesn't make ir worse either.
Wheelbase is not a factor.
Simple physics says otherwise:

understanding-the-dynamics-of-towing-pt2-02.jpg

The short wheelbase's steering axle experiences 25% more force during a sway type of situation.

understanding-the-dynamics-of-towing-pt2-03.jpg

Similarly, if the sway pushes the rear axle laterally, the shorter wheelbase results in 0.4 deg of chassis sway.

Again, for bumper pull. But even with your semi example - it's much easier to save a jackknife on a stretched Pete with 320" wheelbase than a single axle town tractor.
 

billiebob

My Uncle drove a government issued Jeep in Europe
Well factor in rear overhang also. My TJ has 1/3 the rear overhang of a quadcab so..... That 500 number is not constant.

One can spin anything, real world might prove the spin is just spin.
 

Buliwyf

Viking with a Hammer
I'm betting on very soft rear springs. That's the limiting factor. People switching from a F150 to an Expedition were startled that the Expy has a stiffer ride. Because of weight up high, it required stiffer springs to be safe and pass the roll over testing. Soft springs and towing ain't too hot of an idea.

Same truck, same overhang, the LWB will tow better. Will ride better as well.

My long shank rides a little softer, but isn't a big deal. I use a 14" shank more for maneuverability.
 

85_Ranger4x4

Well-known member
But if you get it for under $500 you can rebuild everything to new for less than a 20 year old SUV, and you'll end up with a new truck.
You can do whatever you want (4wd conversion included) but you will still have a truck with a tiny cab and a tiny bed with a tiny GVWR.

Simple physics says otherwise:

View attachment 602688

The short wheelbase's steering axle experiences 25% more force during a sway type of situation.

View attachment 602689

Similarly, if the sway pushes the rear axle laterally, the shorter wheelbase results in 0.4 deg of chassis sway.

Again, for bumper pull. But even with your semi example - it's much easier to save a jackknife on a stretched Pete with 320" wheelbase than a single axle town tractor.
The same goes for vertically, the counterbalance (engine/trans/front axle) being farther from the rear axle makes it more stable that way too.
 

RoyJ

Adventurer
The same goes for vertically, the counterbalance (engine/trans/front axle) being farther from the rear axle makes it more stable that way too.
Good point. The shorter wheelbase causes more front axle unloading, which together the the higher sway forces, compounds the sway issue.
 

roving1

Well-known member
The availability of the Ursa Minor pop top from the dealership is really fantastic. It's almost as if Ford reads the forums.

"Ursa Minor works with Ford dealerships nationwide, allowing the B30 to be included with vehicle purchase and financing."

Wow holy crap I missed this. Being able to finance the top with the vehicle is pretty amazing.

Why the hell doesn't Jeep do this?
 

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plainjaneFJC

Goofball
The 2.7 in my F150 makes a looot of heat when it's towing... It has a larger grill opening, larger bumper opening, a larger radiator, and more air space under the hood when compared to the Bronco. I can absolutely understand why Ford would have to take engine heat into consideration when setting a tow rating.
What kind of weight have you towed? I have only towed about 3500, and didn't notice any heat issues.
 

Jnich77

Director of Adventure Management Operations
What kind of weight have you towed? I have only towed about 3500, and didn't notice any heat issues.
7-7500k. If you use an app like Torque you, when you start climbing a steep grade, can watch the boost rise, then the engine temp rise, and then the tranny. They never got close to being an issue, but they will rise quickly. Boost = heat and the 2.7 loves to spool those little turbos.

Since part of the OEM tranny cooler runs through the radiator, it picks up the engine heat and transfers it to the tranny...which is why I'm swapping to the massive 6.0 powerstroke tranny cooler and by passing the radiator completly.
 
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