It's Bronc o clock

javajoe79

Fabricator
Yeah, the Ranger had issues in development staying cool. The truck was designed mainly for diesels with mechanical fans not boosted 4cyl gassers and they had problems getting enough air in the little grille to cool it so they went old school with a real fan.

Being a clean sheet design I would think they made the grille opening big enough to cool whatever with the Bronco.

Another thing is warranty claims. The diesel gladiator may not be rated as much because they don't think it will stay together well towing that much weight.

The old Rangers, a manual had about half the tow rating as an automatic. Same frame/brakes/springs whatever so it was not a safety thing. Ford didn't want to be replacing clutches under warranty. There is more to it than just springs and crap, although for an offroad vehicle I suppose the Bronco is going to suffer... just like most offroad oriented vehicles (Wrangler, Raptor, Power Wagon etc)
bingo.. all of that
 

Buliwyf

Viking with a Hammer
I'm voting that wheelbase has a major effect on towing stability.

1,000,000 miles towing with pickups and crappy vans, and that's my experience. Weight, wheelbase, and towing under half your trucks rating is key. You can push GVWR a little, but never max the tow rating.

I wouldn't tow more than two jetskis, or a little overlanding rtt trailer, with a Bronco, Ranger, Zr2, or Gladiator.
 

javajoe79

Fabricator
I don’t know if capability is the right word. A short wheelbase is still capable but it would be more stable while towing if the wheelbase was longer.
 

billiebob

My Uncle drove a government issued Jeep in Europe
I've seen so many videos of long box crew cabs doing the sway and crashing you're kidding yourself thinking wheelbase adds security.
Then I've driven plenty of short wheelbase semis and never had a problem. My overlander and work trailer tow vehicle is a TJR, I've never had a problem.

But I agree, if you feel more secure in a longer wheelbase, don't buy a short wheelbase.

I'd say towing a trailer which weighs less than the tow vehicle is the most significant factor for stability. .... Provided both are correctly loaded.
A 6000# QuadCab towing a 12,000# RV trailer will be easier to upset than a 4000# TJ towing a 2000# RV trailer.
 
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roving1

Well-known member
The old Rangers, a manual had about half the tow rating as an automatic. Same frame/brakes/springs whatever so it was not a safety thing.
For awhile it was insane how many tow ratings there were. Manual vs Auto 2.3, vs 3.0 vs 4.0. There was that period where some 2.3s got those fiberglass mono leafs in the rear that were rated hilariously low. Just stepping on the bumper hard on that model would bottom the suspension out lol. It was a lot of different ratings.
 

billiebob

My Uncle drove a government issued Jeep in Europe
Well Ford confirmed today its max tow rating will be 3,500lbs.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
yep, Ford is not willing to compromise the Broncos role of going head on with the Wrangler. To increase its tow rating would involve design changes which would compromise the head on competition.

On the same note, anyone lifting their 4 wheeler and rolling bigger tires also infringed on that manufacturers tow and payload rating.

Please before clicking reply. post your automotive engineering degree.
 

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billiebob

My Uncle drove a government issued Jeep in Europe
There was that period where some 2.3s got those fiberglass mono leafs in the rear that were rated hilariously low.
But for companies like Lordco, Napa, AutoZone. those fiberglass leafs were ideal for thier parts delivery trucks.
All of which means when shopping for that cheap overlander, buyer beware.
 

85_Ranger4x4

Well-known member
For awhile it was insane how many tow ratings there were. Manual vs Auto 2.3, vs 3.0 vs 4.0. There was that period where some 2.3s got those fiberglass mono leafs in the rear that were rated hilariously low. Just stepping on the bumper hard on that model would bottom the suspension out lol. It was a lot of different ratings.
Just saying you could have say two 4.0 trucks with the same everything but transmission and one would have drastically different ratings than the other.

Yeah, from different ends of the spectrum things change a lot.

But for companies like Lordco, Napa, AutoZone. those fiberglass leafs were ideal for thier parts delivery trucks.
All of which means when shopping for that cheap overlander, buyer beware.
If you buy a little 300k mile 2wd 4cyl standard cab shortbox ex Napa ranger for overlanding... you kinda deserve what you get lol.
 

2Jeeps&PatriotX1

Active member
yep, Ford is not willing to compromise the Broncos role of going head on with the Wrangler. To increase its tow rating would involve design changes which would compromise the head on competition.

On the same note, anyone lifting their 4 wheeler and rolling bigger tires also infringed on that manufacturers tow and payload rating.

Please before clicking reply. post your automotive engineering degree.
Never said I was an automotive engineer. I already have f150 & grand cherokee tow vehicles but was hoping and still plan on it, trading the wife’s GC in for the Bronco. My camper is less than the max tow rating so I’ll be ok but it would have been nice to have a buffer. The fact that it’ll come factory with 35s and that tow rating will be good enough for her.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

Buliwyf

Viking with a Hammer
Just because there's an epic ton of shmucks that can't properly setup an RV for towing, doesn't make a SWB better than long. A regular cab, long bed Super Duty tows fine, the crew cab version tows far better. Crew cab DRW is a magnitude better than that.

If a Wranglers tow rating matters to you, then you bought the wrong vehicle. The Bronco isn't a tow rig, Ford sells trucks for that. Get one of those instead.
 

roving1

Well-known member
Just because there's an epic ton of shmucks that can't properly setup an RV for towing, doesn't make a SWB better than long. A regular cab, long bed Super Duty tows fine, the crew cab version tows far better. Crew cab DRW is a magnitude better than that.

If a Wranglers tow rating matters to you, then you bought the wrong vehicle. The Bronco isn't a tow rig, Ford sells trucks for that. Get one of those instead.
What you said isn't untrue but it's still funny that the tow rating is the same for a 20 year old 4 banger Taco using the bumper ball. 🤔 It still seems like the tow rating of the Bronco should be 4500-5000 at least for the 4 door auto. Sooooo many things can tow that amount that are not anything special.
 

javajoe79

Fabricator
I've seen so many videos of long box crew cabs doing the sway and crashing you're kidding yourself thinking wheelbase adds security.
Then I've driven plenty of short wheelbase semis and never had a problem. My overlander and work trailer tow vehicle is a TJR, I've never had a problem.

But I agree, if you feel more secure in a longer wheelbase, don't buy a short wheelbase.

I'd say towing a trailer which weighs less than the tow vehicle is the most significant factor for stability. .... Provided both are correctly loaded.
A 6000# QuadCab towing a 12,000# RV trailer will be easier to upset than a 4000# TJ towing a 2000# RV trailer.
A semi carries the load through the 5th wheel which makes it much easier to control. Semis pull several times the tractor weight without issue because the 5th wheel puts that weight on the entire chassis, not just the back end of the chassis. A bumper pull setup benefits from a longer wheelbase because the trailer has less leverage over the front tires due to the increased distance from the rear tires which serve as the fulcrum point.
So yeah the heavier the tow vehicle the less likely it is to be upset by the trailer and a 5th wheel essentially adds weight to the tow vehicle because of where it is located on the chassis.
Point being, we’re talking bumper pull here. A 5th wheel is totally different
 
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