It’s Here! Jeep Wrangler with Diesel News

AbleGuy

Too Much Fun Club, founder
2020 Jeep Wrangler Adds 3.0L Diesel V-6 with 442 LB-FT of Torque

  • A diesel engine is joining the 2020 Jeep Wrangler's powertrain lineup and will go on sale by the end of this year.
  • The 3.0-liter turbodiesel V-6 will make 260 horsepower and 442 lb-ft of torque.
  • The EcoDiesel engine will be available on four-door Sport, Rubicon, and Sahara models, paired with an eight-speed automatic transmission.
  • The diesel is also likely to command a significant price premium over the gas engines, given that it costs $4995 extra on the Ram pickup.

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Jurfie

Adventurer
Great news. Bring on the JT 3.0D! I’ll be in the market for one in a couple of years and want to see real-world numbers and reports on the all-new transmission mentioned in the article.
 

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dreadlocks

Well-known member
Of course you cannot get it in a manual transmission
Doubt the'd get it past EPA w/a MT, in order to get any Diesel to pass now days they gotta drive it like a gasser, wind the engine up and avoid the peak torque output at all cost to keep pollution output within limits.. as soon as you put a stick in someone's hand the'll drive it like a diesel and the EPA wouldn't allow that.
 

Justincredible

Adventurer
I wonder if they'll beef up the axles.
442 lb/ft seems like a lot to send through the current D44, not to mention the 30 in the front of the Sport and Sahara.
 

86scotty

Explorer
i might be interested if they put it in a JK body. Surely they have a few around.

New diesel. DPF. DEF. No thanks.
 

Dan Grec

Expedition Leader
New diesel. DPF. DEF. No thanks.
GDE (Green Diesel Engineering) can delete all that stuff from the RAM 1500 and Grand Cherokee with the 3.0 EcoDiesel, and they said they will immediately work on doing the same on the Gladiator/Wrangler.

I need to do a lot of research into what will happen to the high pressure diesel pump and injectors if I run really, really nasty quality diesel through it, like what I will find where I plan to go.
I'll try to talk to Gale Banks at SEMA this year about it.

-Dan
 

86scotty

Explorer
That’s good news about the delete. I run a commercial truck at work and have to leave all that intact by law. I certainly hope it can be gotten around.


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luthj

Engineer In Residence
GDE (Green Diesel Engineering) can delete all that stuff from the RAM 1500 and Grand Cherokee with the 3.0 EcoDiesel, and they said they will immediately work on doing the same on the Gladiator/Wrangler.

I need to do a lot of research into what will happen to the high pressure diesel pump and injectors if I run really, really nasty quality diesel through it, like what I will find where I plan to go.
I'll try to talk to Gale Banks at SEMA this year about it.

-Dan

Those high pressure fuel pumps are vulnerable to two things.

Low lubricity fuel
Particulate contamination

The clearances between the parts inside are measured in microns. particles as big as 3 micron can cause damage to the pump or injectors. The fuel is the lubricant, and at 15k psi and higher, it needs to work properly. Even 0.5% emulsified water can disturb the fuels film strength, and cause rapid pump and injector wear. Fuel in the USA tends to have lower overall lubricity than in europe. Due to lower mandates and variance between refinery additive packages.

The good news is that poorly refined diesel has lots of sulfur compounds in it. This improves fuel lubricity and water tolerance a fair bit.

Particulate is a major concern, even particulate that you can't see can damage the system. Factory filters can get overwhelmed by water, asphaltenes, etc. So a 3 micron water coalescing primary filter is suggested.
 

dreadlocks

Well-known member
Sooo buy a very expensive jeep, and immediately void the warranty.. ONLY if you live in an area w/out rigorous diesel inspections in exchange for registration.. If you drive it til the warranty expires and then modify it, also add in a walnut blasting for the carbon fouling the EGR did.

The CP4 High Pressure Fuel Pumps are a ticking time bomb, a whole new fuel system for a common rail gets very expensive quick.. they should all have a 2micron filter from factory, and another filter after the HPFP to hopefully catch everything if it does go boom.. and a water seperator IMO.

I've got a TJ w/AX15 and a 1.9L VE TDI Engine I'd love to bring together, but the Cody kits are too rich for this Jeep and city wont leme do something that custom under my shade tree w/out fining the crap outta me.. I wish I could break ground on my shop already.
 

Dan Grec

Expedition Leader
Those high pressure fuel pumps are vulnerable to two things.

Low lubricity fuel
Particulate contamination

The clearances between the parts inside are measured in microns. particles as big as 3 micron can cause damage to the pump or injectors. The fuel is the lubricant, and at 15k psi and higher, it needs to work properly. Even 0.5% emulsified water can disturb the fuels film strength, and cause rapid pump and injector wear. Fuel in the USA tends to have lower overall lubricity than in europe. Due to lower mandates and variance between refinery additive packages.

The good news is that poorly refined diesel has lots of sulfur compounds in it. This improves fuel lubricity and water tolerance a fair bit.

Particulate is a major concern, even particulate that you can't see can damage the system. Factory filters can get overwhelmed by water, asphaltenes, etc. So a 3 micron water coalescing primary filter is suggested.
Thanks for the info. You obviously know way more about it than I do.
That's good to hear that high sulfur might actually be a good thing in terms of lubrication.

And yes, I would run a two-stage water separation / filtration setup, whatever the finest filter I can run would be (1 micron?)

-Dan
 

Dan Grec

Expedition Leader
Sooo buy a very expensive jeep, and immediately void the warranty.. ONLY if you live in an area w/out rigorous diesel inspections in exchange for registration.. If you drive it til the warranty expires and then modify it, also add in a walnut blasting for the carbon fouling the EGR did.

The CP4 High Pressure Fuel Pumps are a ticking time bomb, a whole new fuel system for a common rail gets very expensive quick.. they should all have a 2micron filter from factory, and another filter after the HPFP to hopefully catch everything if it does go boom.. and a water seperator IMO.
Yes, it's a shame I would void the warranty so soon, but it's only because I want to drive it places where it will never be sold / the diesel is just terribly low quality.
If I was going to stay in developed countries, I wouldn't change a thing and I'd keep the warranty.

Also, yes, I intentionally live in a place with the least amount of regulations possible, so legally it's no problem for me.

-Dan
 

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luthj

Engineer In Residence
You need to evaluate the the micron needs of the engines systems, usually factory filters are 3-5 micron absolute, but it varies a bit. You also need to consider nuisance plugging. In some cases a two filter system, the first being a 40 micron screen type (possibly with centrifugal water separator), and second being a final filter.

Note that most of these engines use in-tank lift pumps that make 50psi+. So many big rig designed systems can't handle the pressure. This also means there is a pickup screen in the fuel tank, which can plug with debris.

Common rail systems have higher flow rate needs, as the fuel lubricates and cools the HP pump and injectors.
 

Utah KJ

Explorer
I have two Jeeps, an 06 KJ CRD, and an 07 WK CRD, so I've been driving turbo-diesel jeeps for years... and never been mistaken for a basic bro.

Just sayin'.... a lot of basic bro's drive JK's and JL's.
 
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