Issues with Inka Outdoors

poptop1

New member
what a shame. i am not sure how he is getting away with completely blowing everyone involved off. Not only are the clients victims but Im sure he owed tens of thousands to vendors as well. I know he wasnt paying employees either. Doing it Mikes way instead of the right way and failing to heed good,sound advice early on was a recipe for disaster unfortunately. Inka was a great idea with piss poor execution.
 

round00

New member
In most places, you get a record and jail for shoplifting...these guys swindle 100ks and walk away after filing bankruptcy

Quality companies should NOT be asking for ANY deposit except for unique, custom work

If they can’t build me a trailer with just my signature on a contract, I’ll go to someone else

Yes, the bankruptcy filing is official. The only way anyone got any refunds thus far has been from their CC companies. Different state Attorney General's are handling it differently, but none seem to be leaning towards criminal charges....yet. It looks like this scum might actually get away with stealing 100's of thousands of dollars and walk free. But if you go into a damned 7-11 and steal a few $100 you will at least get probation. Damned land of the free my ass. Free criminals and free welfare maybe...

The same thing is happening with Ashley Grimes and Moby1, just straight up thieves and frauds.
 

round00

New member
If I were you I’d be calling the cops and the district attorney. That is ridiculous.



If there was a bankruptcy filing then all the creditors should have been notified. I have not been notified of a bankruptcy filing. My loss - $8,100

I was denied refund by my credit card company, Gander Mountain MasterCard (Comenity Bank), because they said they were only liable for the balance outstanding at the time of my claim. My balance was $0.00, because I paid off the card.

But, I am enjoying my Boreas XT from Into The Wild Overland. Wish I had found them first. After paying a small deposit, I had my trailer in a week.
 

Teardropper

Active member
If I were you I’d be calling the cops and the district attorney.
Fraud is an intent crime.

Looking at his product, I think he had a dream and got grossly overextended. If he intended this from the beginning it'd be a damn hard element to prove.

T
 

jacobconroy

Hillbilly of Leisure
In most places, you get a record and jail for shoplifting...these guys swindle 100ks and walk away after filing bankruptcy

Quality companies should NOT be asking for ANY deposit except for unique, custom work

If they can’t build me a trailer with just my signature on a contract, I’ll go to someone else
That sounds good in theory...but we all know that there are many more flake customers on the Internet than there are crooked businesses. Businesses need to have some sort of recourse from their perspective as well.

A deposit is acceptable to hold a place in line, but it should be a small, token amount (that a customer should be able to afford to lose in a worst-case scenario...or if they back out).

I custom ordered a 13 foot Scamp camper two years ago for $14.5K. They charged a $500.00 deposit. I said, "Are you sure that's enough?" and he replied, "We've been doing this for 40 years. We are sure".

They delivered the trailer on time too. Now, the build quality was ********, but they kept their word. :)
 

shade

Well-known member
Fraud is an intent crime.

Looking at his product, I think he had a dream and got grossly overextended. If he intended this from the beginning it'd be a damn hard element to prove.

T
True, at least in the legal sense. Outside a courtroom, it's not hard to see fraud when a company continues to accept new orders & money while filing for bankruptcy. When there's no hope those new orders will ever be filled, what's the true intent of the people taking them? Several of these failures seem to follow a pattern that isn't unique to this market.

Dream > Product > Initial Excitement > Sales > Growing Pains > Backlog >
Moment of Truth: Do we realistically manage our growth & expectations, and revise our business plan?


At the moment of truth, leaders of a company show their business skill & wisdom, or lack thereof. The smart, well-grounded ones make good decisions, or humbly recognize that they lack the ability to do so and seek out a business pro to guide them through the crucible. The not-so-bright, not-so-realistic ones continue stumbling down the wrong path until, predictably:

Things Fall Apart > The Centre Cannot Hold > Chapter 7

Arguably, fraud becomes more provable as the situation devolves into taking new deposits on new sales to fund long delayed orders, impossible completion dates are promised, and outright lies are told in an effort to keep funding a company that's secretly in its death throes. Ask Tyler & Satin Pelfrey for expertise with that business model.

Be honest with yourself and your customers. If you can't make the hard decisions, find someone that can before it's too late.

It isn't easy, but I see those two sentences at the heart of many business failures.
 

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BritKLR

Kapitis Indagatoris
Fraud is an intent crime.

Looking at his product, I think he had a dream and got grossly overextended. If he intended this from the beginning it'd be a damn hard element to prove.

T
Easily investigated and proven in both a criminal and civil court. The fraud (and the intent) occurred the moment he accepted funds without the ability (or choice) to provide the products (With or without a verbal or written contract). Both a first year LE Detective/Investigator or Forensic Accountant (working for a Civil Attorney) could build this case for either a criminal case and/or civil case. Being a bad business person is not an affirmative defense. (Note: Subject to the elements within the State Statute where the crime occurred.)
 
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Teardropper

Active member
Easily investigated and proven in both a criminal and civil court. The fraud (and the intent) occurred the moment he accepted funds without the ability (or choice) to provide the products (With or without a verbal or written contract). Both a first year LE Detective/Investigator or Forensic Accountant (working for a Civil Attorney) could build this case for either a criminal case and/or civil case. Being a bad business person is not an affirmative defense. (Note: Subject to the elements within the State Statute where the crime occurred.)
Retired criminal investigator. And I disagree about how easy it would be to build that case and sell it to a county or federal prosecutor. It's a civil issue.

T
 

BritKLR

Kapitis Indagatoris
Retired criminal investigator. And I disagree about how easy it would be to build that case and sell it to a county or federal prosecutor. It's a civil issue.

T
Thank you for your service! It's always great to meet someone that has also made it to the end and enjoying life beyond the badge!

Fair enough....different agency approaches, different jurisdiction, different statutes and definitely different prosecutors....while the amounts involved (I don't know...) may be below federal prosecutorial guidelines and therefore you may not be able to walk it into the AUSA's Office or have your local Fed adopt the case, I doubt it's below state guidelines. In my old jurisdiction you'd have prosecutors lining up for a criminal case like this (business taking advantage of customers).
As for "It's a civil issue", I will have to respectfully disagree and after 30 years on the job (Deputy, K9, Detective, Narcotics, General Crimes, Violent Crimes, Homicide Squad, Cyber Squad, Federal TFO Sergeant, Investigations Sergeant, Investigations Captain, Division Commander, Chief of Police, blah, blah, blah...) and I have found that to be a easy justification to not work a fraud case. Some agencies get a little intimidated when It comes to money, accounting, business and contracts and defer it to a civil matter, but there are clear criminal statutes for this type of behavior as well. Cheers.
 

BritKLR

Kapitis Indagatoris
Easily investigated and proven in both a criminal and civil court. The fraud (and the intent) occurred the moment he accepted funds without the ability (or choice) to provide the products (With or without a verbal or written contract). Both a first year LE Detective/Investigator or Forensic Accountant (working for a Civil Attorney) could build this case for either a criminal case and/or civil case. Being a bad business person is not an affirmative defense. (Note: Subject to the elements within the State Statute where the crime occurred.)
Great example of the criminal aspect of not doing business correctly -

 

calicamper

Expedition Leader
Vapor ware seems to be a trend with small camp trailer builders. Some advice if they want more than $500 you need to live close by so you can pop in and make sure they are building your trailer every week.

We have a saying in the boat business. Quickest way to make your first million start with 2 million!

The trailer building business is very similar.
 

calicamper

Expedition Leader
Yes the Ranger would be my choice. Torque and 10spd being really nice. Interior is roomy of the three midsized truck choices. Only bummers are only short bed and no front locker. The LB would be my choice so I can fit bikes with gate up.
 
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