Is the TX4x4 club the last to use Citizens Band?

dreadlocks

Well-known member
are you saying HAM's gonna lose license for using these china radios? nonsense.. Licensed Amateurs are not so constrained.. We're permitted to build our own radios from scratch, there is no certification our radios have to meet.. Bao's are perfectly legal for HAM's, Ive seen em displayed at HRO before.

I re-read what you said, and none of it makes any sense.. perhaps you should try clarifying instead of posting FUD and not defending it.
 
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gatorgrizz27

Active member
I do wish there was a (legal/reliable/quality) option for one radio to operate on CB/GMRS/HAM frequencies. Comes with CB from the factory, can enter unlock codes for licensed GMRS and HAM users. Maybe with an emergency override/SOS option if a guy isn’t HAM licensed.

I understand the way the law is written prevents this, unless they were considered different “radios” packaged in the same “housing”. Antennas would obviously be different as well, I use FRS/GMRS after doing my research which I have no issue with communicating with others in my party. In my neck of the woods though, you’re more likely to hail a stranger in the event of an emergency on CB, but I didn’t want a 4-5’ antenna on my car. A quick connect would be a simple solution when needed.

I’m picturing a CB, GMRS, and HAM “radio” (all sold individually with different model #’s if legally necessary) packaged inside a single housing with one 12v power supply, a 4 way switch to power up the various “radios”, a single mic/handset like the Midland MXT275, and 3 different antenna connections on the housing. Any reason this wouldn’t be possible/kosher?

I have very little interest in HAM living in the south, but if I spent more time out west the benefits seem worth the hassle.
 
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MOguy

Explorer
Oh....I wouldn't say that.
I would,

I've been in offroading and using a CB radio since the late nineties. I have been in various off road forums since the early 2000s. The most people ever talk about really is getting a good RF ground for your antenna.

This is the only place I've ever seen it discussed.
 
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MOguy

Explorer
It won’t be long before these frequencies are all shut down a amateur operators are losing their licenses in droves.

CBP really should be seizing these radios at the border and charging the importers.
how do you shut a frequency down?
 

Red90

Adventurer
how do you shut a frequency down?
They remove it from the list of frequencies you are allowed to use. The legal repercussions of using illegal frequencies are much worse than using illegal radios on legal frequencies.
 

BigSwede

The Credible Hulk
I have noticed in the last 10 years far fewer antennas on rigs, And it has me curious to know how far down CB usage has gone. The air waves seem more or less wide open aside from some seriously overpowered truckers in Mexico, or at least Spanish speakers at much higher outputs than should be legal here in TX...
Our club switched from CB to ham about 5 years ago. CB range was inadequate when our convoy got spread out.

If we had to do it again I would lobby for GMRS since they are now widely available and simple as CB to use but much more effective.

I have a 2M ham mounted permanently in the rig, when CB is required I throw in a Midland 75-822 CB with a magnetic antenna, usually for events like FJ Summit. Even there most of the trail leaders were using ham to communicate between groups, CB was just used for the immediate group.
 

dbhost

Active member
I am actually amazed that so many here are saying their clubs are all converted to HAM. (Amateur Radio). For the most part, I have found folks aren't all that interested in the radio rig itself aside from convoying and keeping tabs on the trail.
 

dreadlocks

Well-known member
depends largely on the club's capabilities, goals, size, etc.. if they participate in any search and rescue or rescue and recovery missions HAM support would be prolific and encouraged.. Ive seen offroading clubs show up in force at ham exams, but its definitely regional and I doubt there's much rescue and recovery missions in say Texas w/so little public lands, til houston floods and the bigfoot navy comes to the rescue... here in Colorado the 4x4 clubs will even go out in force during blizzards just to help stranded travelers on the interstates.

if they just a bunch of bros who are out for a good time, comms is far less critical and CB would be more for street cred than any need.
 

BigSwede

The Credible Hulk
I am actually amazed that so many here are saying their clubs are all converted to HAM. (Amateur Radio). For the most part, I have found folks aren't all that interested in the radio rig itself aside from convoying and keeping tabs on the trail.
In truth I would say most of our club members (myself included) only use ham radio as a tool for trail comms, not as a hobby. That's why the new GMRS rigs would work just as well for our purposes.
 

DaveInDenver

Expedition Leader
I am actually amazed that so many here are saying their clubs are all converted to HAM. (Amateur Radio). For the most part, I have found folks aren't all that interested in the radio rig itself aside from convoying and keeping tabs on the trail.
The club in my little corner of the world (Rising Sun 4WD of Colorado) is substantially amateur radio. There's a pretty active radio forum, too. There's about a dozen or so core hams who really are hobbyists so most of the membership are just operators. GMRS could be substituted functionally. There'd be mashing of teeth over spending the money all over, though.
 

prerunner1982

Adventurer
The club in my little corner of the world (Rising Sun 4WD of Colorado) is substantially amateur radio.
I imagine having access to the Colorado Connection (linked repeater system for those not aware) has a bit to do with the adoption of ham radio in your area?
As dreadlocks mentioned, the radio service used by groups/clubs does seem to be regional.
 

DaveInDenver

Expedition Leader
I imagine having access to the Colorado Connection (linked repeater system for those not aware) has a bit to do with the adoption of ham radio in your area?
As dreadlocks mentioned, the radio service used by groups/clubs does seem to be regional.
There were a handful of us who were hams already. We'd be operating on the side during trips. Like you say, the quality of FM mobiles and using repeaters was interesting to a few people. The whole thing started informally and snowballed from there. We taught classes and eventually organized a couple of test sessions that got the bulk of the club licensed over a couple of key years. Since then it's been individuals and they usually just get their ticket when a ham club session comes up or at a swap meet.
 

Klierslc

Explorer
I do wish there was a (legal/reliable/quality) option for one radio to operate on CB/GMRS/HAM frequencies. Comes with CB from the factory, can enter unlock codes for licensed GMRS and HAM users. Maybe with an emergency override/SOS option if a guy isn’t HAM licensed.

I understand the way the law is written prevents this, unless they were considered different “radios” packaged in the same “housing”. Antennas would obviously be different as well, I use FRS/GMRS after doing my research which I have no issue with communicating with others in my party. In my neck of the woods though, you’re more likely to hail a stranger in the event of an emergency on CB, but I didn’t want a 4-5’ antenna on my car. A quick connect would be a simple solution when needed.

I’m picturing a CB, GMRS, and HAM “radio” (all sold individually with different model #’s if legally necessary) packaged inside a single housing with one 12v power supply, a 4 way switch to power up the various “radios”, a single mic/handset like the Midland MXT275, and 3 different antenna connections on the housing. Any reason this wouldn’t be possible/kosher?

I have very little interest in HAM living in the south, but if I spent more time out west the benefits seem worth the hassle.
So, not exactly what you are picturing, but there are plenty of HF rigs that can do all of that. I have an Icom 706mkIIG that can transmit UHF, VHF, and HF. It can also transmit and receive AM signals, which is key for communicating with CBs. Now, it is set up from the factory to only be able to transmit on approved Ham frequencies, but with a little research, it can be turned into a true "all in one radio." If one was to do that, the only thing that the radio is lacking is one lower power setting--current low power is 5w IIRC, and I'd like to be able to transmit on 1w.
 
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