Is KTM a good place to start

98dango

Expedition Leader
I have had 2 different dealers of bolts yamaha and Ktm steer me to the yamaha wr250r as being the best fit bike for my situation. Mostly we travel a lot and a Ktm service is not always easy.
 

goodtimes

Expedition Poseur
If you're not sure what kind of bike is best for you - you can be pretty sure that a KTM isn't it.

Neither is a Husaberg.

Or most BMW's.

If you're looking for something to fart around on once you get to where you're going (ref. your comment about being able to bring it along with your 5th wheel), I'd recommend something in the 200 - 400cc range. They're cheaper to buy into, easier to load/unload, easier to pick up, have a lower seat height, are more efficient, & all around are just "easier" to live with.

If you're looking for something to cover lots of ground with in lieu of your truck/5th wheel, then the bigger bikes start making a whole lot more sense.

Just don't fall into the trap of needing the biggest/best/fastest/brand-namiest bike out there - because you don't. Several years ago I took my Husaberg (FE600) & my ex's DR200 to Mexico for a week of camping on the beach. I put more miles & hours on her DR200 than I did my Husaberg simply because it was better for picking your way through the old washed out roads & trails than the much bigger/faster 'berg. The Husaberg was somewhere north of $10,000 when new, the DR less than half that - and the DR worked better for that type of riding.
 

98dango

Expedition Leader
No this is not my expo rig it's just to go where my expo rig get big.



And she has been lots of places and gets the job done 90% of the time. The 5th wheel is my house till I finish building my cabin.
 

Simons

Adventurer
Sweet rig, she'll never even notice a bike hanging off the bumper, you'll need a bit of a ramp to get it up there though!
Those beefy curtains out back should help keep the travel dust off the bike too
 

bowzer

New member
I have a "old" 1998 dr350 and if i upgrade it will be the wr250r. Enough power, light weight, FI and liquid cooled. Big aftermarket for any scenario.
 

EMrider

Explorer
If you're not sure what kind of bike is best for you - you can be pretty sure that a KTM isn't it.

Neither is a Husaberg.

Or most BMW's.

If you're looking for something to fart around on once you get to where you're going (ref. your comment about being able to bring it along with your 5th wheel), I'd recommend something in the 200 - 400cc range. They're cheaper to buy into, easier to load/unload, easier to pick up, have a lower seat height, are more efficient, & all around are just "easier" to live with.

If you're looking for something to cover lots of ground with in lieu of your truck/5th wheel, then the bigger bikes start making a whole lot more sense.

Just don't fall into the trap of needing the biggest/best/fastest/brand-namiest bike out there - because you don't. Several years ago I took my Husaberg (FE600) & my ex's DR200 to Mexico for a week of camping on the beach. I put more miles & hours on her DR200 than I did my Husaberg simply because it was better for picking your way through the old washed out roads & trails than the much bigger/faster 'berg. The Husaberg was somewhere north of $10,000 when new, the DR less than half that - and the DR worked better for that type of riding.
Very true.

I am a big KTM fan and have owned two. But they are built for "performance", which means either speed or nimbleness, or both. If you enjoyed the TW200 and want light weight and fun, then grab another TW200 or get an XT225. Both great bikes and good values.

The KTMs are typically light and have good power, but they are more expensive and may require more maintenance.

When my riding habits/needs changed from riding technical singletrack at speed to exploring and cruising remote areas, I switched to an XR400.

If you don't see yourself pushing your abilities on the trail, then look for a good used TW200, XT225, XR250, XR400, DR400, DR350 and ride that for awhile. You can always get a KTM later if you find that it fits your needs better.

R
 

98dango

Expedition Leader
I can tell you I hate motorcycle dealers. The 3 I have been in lately can not grasp my idea of dual sport. I want a street legal dirt bike. I don't want a bike that out weighs my super duty. At the same time I don't want a Cr 500. I walked in to a honda dealer to look at a Crf230l and they where happy to show me every thing but the L. I guess when I say haul they forget my want of license plates. I understand that in Montana my Trx 450r is street legal ish but not in Washington where I am right now. I want all 50 state no questions legal.

I have decided Ktm is a nice bike and I may go that route in a few years. I am very interested in the WR250R and Xt250 the Tw 200 I use a friends often and when the trail gets wet but not sloppy muddy it sucks. That fat back can't grab a Damn thing I also find it lacking in power I'm sure a little adjustment would fix that but it's not mine. I don't have much love for honda mostly because the dealer near me is a joke. I will be back in beautiful Montana on the 3rd so I'll see what I find there. The suzuki Dr is on my list but not found any ton look at.

I also find that I am short when talking trail riding 5'8".
How important is being able to flat foot a bike.
 

SDDiver5

Expedition Leader
When you search on CL and see a bike that is an ADV modeled bike with the off road extras and you ask them why they are selling it, their response is usually "I am getting a KTM".

KTM seems to be the go to bike once you have experienced a dual sport for a few years.
 

Recommended books for Overlanding

98dango

Expedition Leader
The ktm is nice and there resale is high. I sure what one but I also know 1 of 2 this is going to happen I ride alot and want to up grade or it sits in the barn next to the race car drag car rock crawler and the lawn mower.

Sent from my SAMSUNG-SGH-I537 using Tapatalk
 

98dango

Expedition Leader
The ktm is nice and there resale is high. I sure what one but I also know 1 of 2 things is going to happen I ride alot and want to up grade or it sits in the barn next to the race car drag car rock crawler and the lawn mower.

Sent from my SAMSUNG-SGH-I537 using Tapatalk


Sent from my SAMSUNG-SGH-I537 using Tapatalk
 

goodtimes

Expedition Poseur
I also find that I am short when talking trail riding 5'8".
How important is being able to flat foot a bike.
A bit hard to answer that - it's different for each rider.

For me, it's not hugely important. I'm 5'6" with a 30" inseam. My Husaberg's seat was 38" off the ground. I could *just barely* get the toe of each boot on the ground, when sitting on level ground. Just slide to one side a bit & I could get the ball of one foot down - which was OK for me considering the bike was didn't weigh much & I didn't get into really technical terrain with it to often.

Just as important as seat height is seat width. The Husaberg had a seat 4 or 5" wide, while my BMW's seat is somewhere in the neighborhood of 3X that wide. Even though the BMWs seat is 4" closer to the ground, I can still only get the toe of each boot on the ground.

The places where having a low seat height are a major advantage (for me at least) are where the terrain or surrounding obstructions have me slowed way down. Picking my way between a cliff & a couple cactus, steep/rocky hills where I lost momentum & had to stop (and thus get moving again), water crossings that are filled with large submerged rocks, etc. Basically, in places where you can't use a bit of speed to keep the bike stable. As you gain experience & confidence, you'll carry more speed through more places, which will reduce the number of places that getting a foot to the ground is important. In that regard, every rider is different. It's all about what you're comfortable with, & what you want to do.
 

98dango

Expedition Leader
My main riding will be trails. I want to be able to explore around camp. Not much hi way for this guy I have my couch (superduty) for that

Sent from my SAMSUNG-SGH-I537 using Tapatalk
 

goodtimes

Expedition Poseur
The ktm is nice and there resale is high. I sure what one but I also know 1 of 2 this is going to happen I ride alot and want to up grade or it sits in the barn next to the race car drag car rock crawler and the lawn mower.
If it turns out to be #2 - just sell it.

I bought a TW200 for my ex - she ended up not liking the fat tires, so a year after I bought it, I sold it for $150 less than I paid for it. It cost me $12/month in depreciation. After that, I bought her a DR200. Ultimately she didn't like that either, so I sold it 2 years later for $200 less than I paid for it. Less than $9/month.
 

Fishpilot

New member
First, do it! 2 wheels are tons of fun. That being said, with the amount of customization, aftermarket options, tire swapping, and professional suspension tuning available you can make any bike fit nearly anything you want to do, within reason of course. I've got a WR450 and ride with quite a few KTM only guys, everyone has a preference and every bike has strong points.

Prepare for blanket statements, opinions, and generalizations:
-Japanese bikes are more reliable, routine maintenance and a valve job after the first few hundred miles and you are set for a long long time.
-Japanese bikes are cheaper new and used. Parts are easier to find but the internet can equalize most supply problems.
-KTMs have the sweetest brakes and finest clutch feel out there, this can mean a lot on a multi day difficult ride with long miles.
-Dirtbike maintenance is pretty easy and there aren't many specialized tools required until you start getting into suspension work. This can be a plus if the nearest shop isn't close.

Find a used one, there are tons of people out there that think they want a 2 wheeler then sell it a year or two later before they even wear the mold marks off the tires. Also, I may have missed it if you've already made your choice, but the bigger issue is 2 vs 4 stroke. I vote 4 stroke for general exploring and trail running but there isn't enough time in the day to discuss that rider preference. Don't forget to budget a few hundred bucks for boots and a helmet at the least.

Best of luck.
 

Stumpalump

Expedition Leader
I'd love to build up a KTM 150 for technical tight stuff. I ride a KTM 200 on them now. It's my second KTM. The Honda or any Jap bikes are just as good and even better when it comes time to fix them. I like the way the Jap bikes feel. Look at the KTM 500 as well. I think that and the 150 are the best bikes they make. In other sizes just pick a color they all work fine.
 
Top