Is it possible to calculate payload?

mrfoamy

Mrfoamy
Ordering an F350, there are seven different payload categories for a 164" WB, SCLB4x4SRW. The GVWR is surely related to snowplow pkg, etc options, but how do I know in advance what is my GVWR when ordering the truck?

MAX
GVWR PAYLOAD
9,900 3,590
10,000 3,690
10,300 3,990
10,800 4,440
11,000 3,960
11,400 4,300
11,500 4,400
 

Gunnslinger

Adventurer
Max GVWR - Curb Weight = Payload

According to Wikipedia;

The gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR), or gross vehicle mass (GVM) is the maximum operating weight/mass of a vehicle as specified by the manufacturer[1] including the vehicle's chassis, body, engine, engine fluids, fuel, accessories, driver, passengers and cargo but excluding that of any trailers.

Curb weight (American English) or kerb weight (British English) is the total weight of a vehicle with standard equipment and hardpoints, all necessary operating consumables such as motor oil, transmission oil, coolant, air conditioning refrigerant, and sometimes a full tank of fuel, while not loaded with either passengers, cargo, and/or weaponry.
 

mrfoamy

Mrfoamy
Maybe I did not make the question clear:
"how do I know in advance what is my GVWR when ordering the truck?"...with 7 different GVWR's listed in the brochure.
 

Ovrlnd Rd

Adventurer
Ask the dealer what it is based on the options you're ordering. If they can't do that find a different dealer.
 

mrfoamy

Mrfoamy
Thanks, I hoped to do that online and avoid potential nonsense conversations. Probably not easy to do without calling dealer.
 

IdaSHO

IDACAMPER
Technically it isn't possible without having the truck itself, and visiting a scale.

MFG's are trying to sell you truck curb weight details but the simple fact is that it weighs what it weighs, and you dont know that until you actually weigh it.
 

mrfoamy

Mrfoamy
I bet there is more logic than that. My guess is the snowplow pkg gives one GVRW, a Heavy Service Front Suspension Package might be another, the 5th-Wheel/Gooseneck Trailer Tow Prep Package a greater GVRW yet, etc.

Finding this on-line might be possible but not easy. I hoped someone here (maybe from Ford) might link a chart.
 

IdaSHO

IDACAMPER
You are not following.

GVWR is GVWR, and is set by the MFG based upon whatever.

PAYLOAD is a very simple calculation based upon curb weight and GVWR.
Without knowing the actual curb weight, you will not know the actual payload.
 
Not that simple. The mfg sells a truck with a given gvwr. That rating is driven more by economics than physics. Vehicles with higher ratings incur more government expense and put the rig into different classes of requirements. So they pick a number that works $ wise and then subtract the weight of the vehicle as equipped from that to give you payload. For example a diesel will have less payload than a gasser because it weighs more. That game is almost all about economics.

To really determine your payload you can research the weight capacity of the components involved and base your actual weight capacity based on actual truck weight subtracted from the weakest link. Usually the weakest link is tires and or wheels. Those can be upgraded. Find the ratings for the axles and start there. Upgrade wheels/tires to get to where you want.

Generally the sterling or Dana axles will have a higher rating than you would think based on the factory ‘payload’ rating.

For example my sterling 10.5 axle is rated at 10,000# on the rear. I upped my wheels/tires to 4k# each for 8k# for the axle. Now that is my weakest link.

There’s a little more to it but do your research and you’ll find discussions about it. As long as you stay under the combined weight rating (which is driven by brakes, transmission, and am engine capability) and under the rating of your weakest component, you’ll be ok, and have more payload than the factory sticker says.


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mrfoamy

Mrfoamy
Hmmm...Does this sound right?
Those GVWR numbers in the Ford F350 brochure GVWR/Payload page range from 9,900 to 11,500, all for the F350SC4x4 164" WB. So maybe a snowplow/camper pkg - gas engine - lightly optioned ...the GVWR should be closer to the 11,500. And a diesel heavily optioned should be closer to the 9,900. But it is impossible to tell without the exact build. Does that sound right? A person could add the snowplow/camper pkg and just estimate/rough guess the GVWR?
 

Darwin

Explorer
A vehicle with a camper at the top of the GVWR and over will handle poorly offroad and on uneven surfaces. Spec the truck so that you are well below the GVWR by a few thousand pounds or more.
 
A vehicle with a camper at the top of the GVWR and over will handle poorly offroad and on uneven surfaces. Spec the truck so that you are well below the GVWR by a few thousand pounds or more.
Not really possible. Say you have a 4K payload...which is a lot... now find a 2k# camper. Not too many options.

Or... build the rig up to do what you want it to. Lots of possibilities. Springs, airbags, swaybars, etc. My camper weighs about 4k# loaded. Handles reasonably well given the load. Run the rubicon? Never. Get me to that epic spot off the grid in Baja? Yep.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro
 

mrfoamy

Mrfoamy
I was actually thinking of staying high on rated capacity, then removing leafs or replacing suspension components to optimize ride/handling.
 

Dalko43

Explorer
Not that simple. The mfg sells a truck with a given gvwr. That rating is driven more by economics than physics. Vehicles with higher ratings incur more government expense and put the rig into different classes of requirements. So they pick a number that works $ wise and then subtract the weight of the vehicle as equipped from that to give you payload. For example a diesel will have less payload than a gasser because it weighs more. That game is almost all about economics.

To really determine your payload you can research the weight capacity of the components involved and base your actual weight capacity based on actual truck weight subtracted from the weakest link. Usually the weakest link is tires and or wheels. Those can be upgraded. Find the ratings for the axles and start there. Upgrade wheels/tires to get to where you want.

Generally the sterling or Dana axles will have a higher rating than you would think based on the factory ‘payload’ rating.

For example my sterling 10.5 axle is rated at 10,000# on the rear. I upped my wheels/tires to 4k# each for 8k# for the axle. Now that is my weakest link.

There’s a little more to it but do your research and you’ll find discussions about it. As long as you stay under the combined weight rating (which is driven by brakes, transmission, and am engine capability) and under the rating of your weakest component, you’ll be ok, and have more payload than the factory sticker says.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro
The problem with the above argument is that no one has actually taken the time to thoroughly research the ratings for all the individual components (brakes, suspension components, transmission, ect.). That's why the best practice is to abide what the OEM payload rating is for a given vehicle...this topic has been beaten to death.

Economics has some role in the OEM payload ratings for the HD trucks. 3/4 ton's seem to have an arbitrary hard-cap at 10k lb GVWR, though they otherwise share the same chassis and frame with their 1 ton brethren. I don't know why those 10k lb hard-caps exist, since a 1 ton doesn't cost much more, if at all, to register with the local DMV. So there is perhaps an argument to be made that those 3/4 ton's are somewhat underrated when it comes to payload #'s.

I don't think the same principle applies to midsized and 1/2 ton trucks...the payload/towing ratings are what they are with those categories.
 
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