Is $500 a good price for a 2008 Gary Fischer HiFi Pro?

D-R0CK

New member
Can a bike that was $3k when new 8 years ago be so cheap already? It sounds almost too good to be true, but the listing for the bike includes a serial number that hasn't come up as stolen. The description says the bike needs new tubes and rear brake maintenance - neither of which seem all that intimidating. I'm assuming it's easier to work on than a motorcycle?

Also, is this a decent beginner bike? I've never tried MTN biking but I'm tired of getting beat up on my dirt bike. Bikepacking sounds really fun too. I'm not really sure yet what kind of riding I like but I figure the best bet is to get an older flagship model to figure that out rather than a brand new entry level bike.

Thanks all! I'm looking forward to trying the world of mountain biking!
 

Christophe Noel

Expedition Leader
The value of used bikes is highly variable. Consider the cost of the following pieces should they need to be replaced:

Tires - $75 pair
Chain - $40
Cassette - $75
Brake Pads - $50
Shift cables/housing - $50

Labor to install all of the above and tune the bike - easily $150.

So, a $500 bike, or any bike, can easily need an additional $350-450 to get it back into shape for just a few more seasons of riding. There's no way to know if this bike you're looking at needs those things without taking it to a shop first.

Other things to keep in mind. If the fork needs maintenance, that too can be $75-100. This bike also has 26-inch wheels, which are not nearly as popular as they were in 2008. In fact, that wheel size is all but dead in most segments of the mtb world.

I think you're right that starting with a used bike is the way to go. Finding the right one can be tricky. $500 for this one, could be a good deal. Could also be a money sucker.
 

Flagster

Expedition Leader
26" wheels may be dead to manufacturers who convince us that once we switched to 29"...27.5" is better...and those new wheels you just built...won't work with your new frame's boost hub spacing...and you don't run + size rubber...well nuff said
But that wheel size is completely capable, durable, and cheap...you can find top shelf 26" hoops and forks on ebay for a steal...

Yes the maintenance/refurb might be a bit but you can do alot of that yourself...if you have a few hours...the fork might take a bit more know but it isn't that hard...
 

Christophe Noel

Expedition Leader
I mention the 26 inch wheel as being dead because that is largely what crushes older 26-inch wheeled bike prices.

Although bikes are easy to work on, they do demand a full understanding of the nuance of bike mechanics. The tiniest things make a huge difference. As an example, just cutting cable housings needs to be done with precision and a specific process to ensure they work properly. Many things also require special tools, like those needed to bleed brakes, etc.
 

timehoc

New member
The owner might not have kept up with suspension maintenance either. Front and rear rebuilds run $150 each.
 
How does it ride? Do you like the bike and will you ride it? If the bike isn't just right for you trust me it will sit a lot more than a bike that fits you well. Do you need full suspension? They are a complex system and it is an older bike. Like the others pointed out are you willing to spend the time and money if needed? For the money you could get into a much better hard tail with 27.5 wheels. It is amazing how fast high end trickles down to affordable bikes in just a few years.


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
 

Flagster

Expedition Leader
Although bikes are easy to work on, they do demand a full understanding of the nuance of bike mechanics. The tiniest things make a huge difference. As an example, just cutting cable housings needs to be done with precision and a specific process to ensure they work properly. Many things also require special tools, like those needed to bleed brakes, etc.
I agree but after working on bikes for many many years...think campy nuevo record when I started...I think basic bike maintenance is an "easy" skill to learn and can be very helpful when out and about.


While many newer systems such as suspension/hydraulics/BB interfaces take some specialized tools and a bit more time...bike tools in general are often paid off with one install...I guess it just depends on the person and how much time and desire they have to wrench on stuff...I like wrenching on my bikes and driving stock trucks so I don't really belong on this forum anyway:ylsmoke:
 

Christophe Noel

Expedition Leader
I'd wager that during my decade as a mechanic, a solid third of my work was correcting "repairs" done by home mechanics. There's a joke in the bike industry that the home mechanic is the best thing to ever happen to the pro mechanic. LOL
 

D-R0CK

New member
Well, I got a bike! Not the GaryF though - which sold the afternoon I emailed the seller.

I ended up getting myself a 2000 (Old, I know) Specialized Rockhopper A1 FSR.

It is heavy, and has rim brakes (V type) 26" tires, and spring suspension (which I hear is a tradeoff with some advantages anyways)

BUT, it has full suspension, a robust frame with great looking welds, newer tires, Deore shifters, 27 speeds, a decent newer seat, and best of all; it was $180. Seems like the perfect way to cut my teeth.

Thanks all!
 
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