Is 4x4 really necessary for a cabover build?

MTVR

Well-known member
Then theres this...

A 4WD Olds Drag Car from the 1960s.
Two supercharged Olds 455s, one in the trunk.
Zero to 180mph in 8.6seconds. The Hurst "Hairy" Olds.
It crashed spectacularly.

View attachment 595523
The Hurst Hairy Olds was two cars, not one. A '66 and a '67.

They were exhibition cars, not race cars.

Each car was basically two Toronado front wheel drive subframes welded together with 2x3" frame rails, with a roll cage tying it all together. They were really crude.

Both cars used 425 engines, not 455s. The 455 was not introduced until 1968, AFTER the Hurst Hairy Olds project.

The engines were built by Joe Mondello and ran on nitromethane.

The cars ran in the 11s, not the 8s.

Retired drag racing driver "Gentleman" Joe Schubeck (owner of Lakewood Industries) was the driver. He didn't want to drive the cars, but changed his mind when they added the exceptionally-proportioned 23 year old beauty queen Linda Vaughn to the pit crew.

This AWD car ran in the 7s, with six cylinders, not 16. And it's a street car too:

 
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MTVR

Well-known member
The '66 Hurst Hairy Olds was crashed because of an alignment problem- under acceleration, the wheels toed in...a lot.

The car was undriveable, until they figured out that they could toe the wheels out...a lot, and under acceleration it would pull the wheels in to the point that they were all pointed in more or less the same direction.

That worked well enough that they could finally herd the car all the way to the finish line under throttle. Then one day at U.S. 131, the magneto in the front engine failed, causing the front engine to quit. When it did, the front wheels toed way out (at speed), and the car ran off the track and crashed.

That's why the '67 car was built- to replace the '66 car.
 
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gregmchugh

Observer
The '66 Hurst Hairy Olds was crashed because of an alignment problem- under acceleration, the wheels toed in...a lot.

The car was undriveable, until they figured out that they could toe the wheels out...a lot, and under acceleration it would pull the wheels in to the point that they were all pointed in more or less the same direction.

That worked well enough that they could finally herd the car all the way to the finish line under throttle. Then one day at U.S. 131, the magneto in the front engine failed, causing the front engine to quit. When it did, the front wheels toed way out (at speed), and the car ran off the track and crashed.

That's why the '67 car was built- to replace the '66 car.
boy has this thread gone off the tracks :)

but since we are already there...

 

lucilius

Member
Snow and ice in the forecast? 4WD/AWD is a good thing indeed but having the right winter tires for your rig is crucial. Though I dare say chains can do a lot, more in some cases, in a 2WD format than an AWD/4WD without them, especially in a very heavy rig. Lightweight chains are really amazing in the snow and ice and can turn a very dangerous trip on snow and ice into a normal affair....of course you will have to spend the time and effort putting them on/taking them off, Goretex/equiv and good gloves are your friends for this, and don't forget to hang them up to dry after the trip and then hit them with some fluid film.
 

billiebob

Well-known member
This is his 4th run at the hill from the ferry landing. He starts moving 30 seconds in. Triple Lockers and 8 tires chained up.

 

billiebob

Well-known member
Totally off topic but I love this video.

40 years ago John Force was a drag racer, he married and had kids. His wife decided we, the family are with you, on the road 8 months a year, home schooling, the works. He has 4 daughters all 4 plus his wife have NHRA Drag Racing Licenses. All 6 have run Top Fuel. Today he and his daughter both run Funny Car. Zero to 300mph in 4 seconds. I'm not a big drag racing fan but watching them compete is incredible.

 

Daviticus

New member
I feel like all wheels/axles of a vehicle should be powered for traction sake. If you aren’t completely sold on 4wd, at least have recovery gear and consider a winch, and look into a rear locker.

When I was a landscaper, I spent probably 1/4 of my time on the job site pulling out our RWD, open diff NPR and UD cabovers, from areas that when loaded were easily navigated, but once empty all they’d do is spin one half of the rear. I’ve lost count how many times I’ve been stuck in wet grass in a 2wd truck, loaded or not. I’ve also been places in a stock, open diff Volvo sedan that some Jeeps struggled to get to - weight and balance, traction, and suspension/chassis flex all work with driver skill/knowledge to make that stuff happen. Everyone will have an anecdote for or against it, and they’re all only conditionally correct, mine included.

My NPR will be 4wd soon. I don’t trust LSDs (limited slip = no guarantee both axles are ever locked together, I have been stranded by them before), and no positive locking diffs are available for the rear axle I have currently in the truck. I like the idea of having the front axle “pulling” when traction is limited in the rear, to me that is a suitable replacement when a positive lock rear isn’t available. Especially in something nose-heavy like a cabover (when unladen at least).

It’s a lot like having a tool for every job - you may be able to manage with the tools you have that are used frequently (how you equip your truck), and may have the option of borrowing a tool for the occasional need (recovery help from a friend/stranger on the trail), but I personally would rather have that tool I’ve used once over years (in this case, a driven front axle) in my toolbox for the day I may need to use it again.
 

Jnich77

Director of Adventure Management Operations
Totally off topic but I love this video.

40 years ago John Force was a drag racer, he married and had kids. His wife decided we, the family are with you, on the road 8 months a year, home schooling, the works. He has 4 daughters all 4 plus his wife have NHRA Drag Racing Licenses. All 6 have run Top Fuel. Today he and his daughter both run Funny Car. Zero to 300mph in 4 seconds. I'm not a big drag racing fan but watching them compete is incredible.


If you stand at the wall by the starting line, they rattle your chest when they launch.
 

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Totally dependent on what tricks your trigger when you travel. Some people like the beaten paths and there is no shortage of fun without 4x4. For us it is a requirement on an adventure mobile. We don’t purposely go 4-wheeling but the places we like to frequent require it. Sometimes just to get that last little bit to the primo spot, or exploring beaches to find our own little surf peak. You can’t really do Baja “right” without it. Also once you get into Central America if you are exploring rural areas there are many roads posted 4x4 only. When it comes time to sell the rig 4x4 is an attractive option and we have always made back the investment in resale value.
 

Buckstopper

Adventurer
I would recommend 4x4. These rigs are heavy and when they get stuck you are really stuck. 4x4 gives you a chance to get out of trouble but also you can get deeper into trouble but I like the having that option. If you don't go 4x4 (and even if you do), I would highly recommend a winch sized for the weight of truck and self recovery gear if you are getting very far off the beaten path.
 

GR8ADV

Explorer
Ha! That’s funny. I didn’t read all of the posts. forget just 4wd, I have had to bail myself out with the low transfer case in multiple occasions.

i suspect this is why new Fuso Earthcruiser’s and the such at not getting their ‘value’. The 2 speed transfer case is a must. Oh and and yes On the 4wd part. ...
 

GR8ADV

Explorer
I am not understanding what you are saying here?
Poorly written on my part.
.
Generally speaking, in my opinion only, an auto Fuso without a two speed transfer case has a more limited audience than a Fuso with one. Hence, the demand for said is reduced. And thus the resulting price and ability to sell reflects that.
.
I personally would not own one without the low transfer case, especially with that Duonic transmission.
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Just my personal 2 pennies on the subject. You get what you pay for. Hope that makes more sense.
 
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