IPad, iPhone and InReach

j_pnw

New member
Does the InReach just complicate things? What’s its advantage verses a regular external GPS device?
I use the inReach with my phone when I leave the car, so for me it's easier to use the external GPS in the car so I'm not switching back and forth every time.
 

j_pnw

New member
One other thing to note is that on the Gaia website, they do state that there may be issues pairing the inReach with an iPad, but I never had issues using them together before getting an external GPS sensor.
 

Chorky

Observer
I prefer CalTopo to Gaia. It has most the same features but has better trip planing. You can run some basic GIS analysis (without having to use ArcMap) and get sun, shade, sunrise, sunset visibility analysis - even some pretty good weather analysis for specific locations. It does allow tracking as well but I do think Gaia does better tracking. However, for pre-trip planning caltrop does terrain analysis. I have used it quite a bit to pre plan a trip to target certain types of desired or undesired weather, or make sure a already planned trip is going to be good. It's pretty powerful I think... And you can bring out paper and waterproof maps through another company they partner with. There is also an available app on your phone/tablet to download your maps and record tracks or pictures. Data can be exported if you so desired to track everything through Esri.

I also use a Garmin. but that is specifically for communications and SOS - not so much any of their hiking maps or data.

Here are a few examples


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eyemgh

Active member
I prefer CalTopo to Gaia. It has most the same features but has better trip planing. You can run some basic GIS analysis (without having to use ArcMap) and get sun, shade, sunrise, sunset visibility analysis - even some pretty good weather analysis for specific locations. It does allow tracking as well but I do think Gaia does better tracking. However, for pre-trip planning caltrop does terrain analysis. I have used it quite a bit to pre plan a trip to target certain types of desired or undesired weather, or make sure a already planned trip is going to be good. It's pretty powerful I think... And you can bring out paper and waterproof maps through another company they partner with. There is also an available app on your phone/tablet to download your maps and record tracks or pictures. Data can be exported if you so desired to track everything through Esri.

I also use a Garmin. but that is specifically for communications and SOS - not so much any of their hiking maps or data.

Here are a few examples


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I love Caltopo. I have a premium subscription to both. I‘ll have to dig deeper. Thanks for the tip!
 

ShaoCan

New member
Hey man, thanks for posting this! I also own an iPhone 12 Pro Max, and I would really like to learn to use Gaia. Have you already managed to work it out? Is it worth bothering with it? I have to say it's quite expensive, and that's why I'm still hesitating on whether I should purchase it or not. By the way, I guess Gaia should work fine with a 7th gen iPad. I used to have one myself, and I remember being amazed by its screen resolution. However, my little brother dropped it accidentally, and it got destroyed. The little prick, lol. Anyway, at least I was able to recover all my data. Cheers!
 
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eyemgh

Active member
Hey man, thanks for posting this! I also own an iPhone 12 Pro Max, and I would really like to learn to use Gaia. Have you already managed to work it out? Is it worth bothering with it?
I’ve messed with it some, but haven’t actually planned and executed a trip yet. I really think it’s the way to go though. I just read a headline that Caltopo is doing an InReach integration. Gotta read more.
 

pluton

Adventurer
I played briefly with Caltopo and decided that the UI was not intuitive for me, and <<<<IMO>>>> the instructions seem to have been written by people that spent too much time enmeshed in government or military bureaucracy.
 

DaveInDenver

Luddite
I played briefly with Caltopo and decided that the UI was not intuitive for me, and <<<<IMO>>>> the instructions seem to have been written by people that spent too much time enmeshed in government or military bureaucracy.
I'm a Caltopo subscriber but there's no denying you're right that the phone and web apps are, I dunno, more "get straight to the point" and not as casual GIS friendly by themselves.
 
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80t0ylc

Hill & Gully Rider
I also use the InReach, iPhone, iPad and Gaia combo. I initially loaded Gaia on my phone, but it's display is too small to be comfortable for me for maps. Now it's on the iPad and works great with the pro subscription for downloading maps ahead of time. Only issues with the iPad are the life of the battery during a long day on the trail, even plugged in to my inverter's 5A USB, since it uses more power than it can charge. The other issue is the iPad's sensitivity to higher temps. It'll shut down in the summer on the desert (95F+) unless the AC is turned on and even sometimes if it is in direct sunlight. I've even used the iPad/Gaia on some hikes into wilderness areas, but same issues exist with batt life and high temps. InReach is great for off grid comm texts and peace of mind paired with phone or pad for a much more useable keyboard.
 

eyemgh

Active member
I also use the InReach, iPhone, iPad and Gaia combo. I initially loaded Gaia on my phone, but it's display is too small to be comfortable for me for maps. Now it's on the iPad and works great with the pro subscription for downloading maps ahead of time. Only issues with the iPad are the life of the battery during a long day on the trail, even plugged in to my inverter's 5A USB, since it uses more power than it can charge. The other issue is the iPad's sensitivity to higher temps. It'll shut down in the summer on the desert (95F+) unless the AC is turned on and even sometimes if it is in direct sunlight. I've even used the iPad/Gaia on some hikes into wilderness areas, but same issues exist with batt life and high temps. InReach is great for off grid comm texts and peace of mind paired with phone or pad for a much more useable keyboard.
My phone does that too in the bright sun. I understand why, but it’s annoying.
 
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