Interior Wall and Ceiling Materials Advice

dtruzinski

Explorer
I am converting a 2003 Ford F450 ambulance to an expo rig. In my previous builds (Fuso chassis), I used luan panels and 1/4" plywood for the interior wall skins and ceiling. In my first build, I painted the wood for my walls/ceiling and in the second build, I stained luan panels with 4 coats of poly for a protection layer. I have been looking into alternative products like HDPE and honeycomb composite panels. Has anyone used something similar and what was your experience? How did you attach it? Was it rigid enough to stay flat against the surface? All advice welcome, even it if is to use plywood and cover it with fabric!

Thanks in advance
Dave
 

DiploStrat

Expedition Leader
G'day Dave!

No personal experience, but I have noted some folks that I respect using high tech, light plywood, faced with a melamine like substance. The melamine is highly water resistant while the plywood makes a nice screw surface lighter things, like wire looms, etc. The ply is almost as light as the high tech composites.

The interior of our camper is all super high tech foam stuff and it is a colossal pain to work with. Everything requires backing plates, etc., and anything that is simply screwed in will fail eventually.

Free advice with the usual caveats.

Something like this, perhaps: https://www.laminwood.com.ph/melamine-on-marien-plywood/
 
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dtruzinski

Explorer
@DiploStrat Fred, It has been a long time since we last spoke. I see you have moved on from the Tiger to a Mercedes 4x4 with an XP Camper. That is such a cool setup. Thanks for the feedback on wall panels. I will look into this option.
 
Luan and indoor/outdoor carpet glued to it. Took care of condensation dripping down on me (dries quickly when exposed to fresh air) and added a layer of insulation and sound deadening.
 

plh

Explorer
HDPE moves around a ton with thermal changes. CoE is around 10x compared to steel. Temperature ranges from -40F to +185F should be considered for a vehicle interior. So a 225F temperature swing on an 8' length of HDPE will move 2.38". Whereas your steel frame in 8' will only move 0.14" in that same temperature swing. I wouldn't consider it.
 
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dtruzinski

Explorer
HDPE moves around a ton with thermal changes. CoE is around 10x compared to steel. Temperature ranges from -40F to +185F should be considered for a vehicle interior. So a 225F temperature swing on an 8' length of HDPE will move 2.38". Whereas your steel frame in 8' will only move 0.14" in that same temperature swing. I wouldn't consider it.
Thanks for the comment on HDPE. I had no idea that it moved that much with thermal changes!

Cheers,
Dave
 
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