interior build reference surfaces

s.e.charles

Well-known member
I am aware builders use levels to layout their interior appurtenances. but unless the vehicle chassis is set fixed level (with or without suspension compensation) what purpose does level & plumb serve? as soon as the vehicle is moved from its construction spot, things go awry quickly. under construction, what happens to level when the builder moves about jockeying materials & tools to get the next component templated, measured, or installed?

in the boatyard we used a declivity level to set work right, but the hull was always blocked to hold a constant before any further work was undertaken.

maybe it's me that's a half-bubble off plumb, but I just don't get it.
 

NatersXJ6

Explorer
Any time I’ve ever built or designed equipment inside a vehicle or trailer I’ve blocked it level during construction so I had reference surface to measure from.
 

s.e.charles

Well-known member
I don't understand why not work from the floor with perpendicular???? if it's a daily driver as I suspect many folks use their rigs, seems like a metric tonne of work to set up & take down constantly. when I did my van a few years and too many $$$ ago, I made a triangle with a 3/ 4/ 5 proportion and got everything ranged in with that. and a 3' flexible aluminum straightedge. I may have even used string a couple of times to get some idea where I was in the volume.

for what it's worth, the inside of a GMC savanna is barrel shaped. if you're rough cutting stock, use the mid-point dimension.
 

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NatersXJ6

Explorer
One could certainly work from the floor and calculate perpendicularly... not every floor is flat and not everything squares or calculates easily. If you know that the reference surfaces (usually floor or wheel wells) are level, then using a level for plumb and level is quick and easy.
 
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