Interesting Portable Chain Saw

vintageracer

To Infinity and Beyond!
 

NatersXJ6

Explorer
I’ve used similar saws before. For packability and occasional use it can’t be beat. At that price it is probably a great value. In my Jeep I just carry an 18” limb pruning saw that almost never gets used... similar price point, so it would be a toss up.
 
hand saw of some sort should be in every survival kit IMO. Chain saw blades with car ring attachments work great just like the one you have posted above. You can buy one long blade, knock out two links and make two survival kits saws with one blade and 4 keyring.
 

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alanymarce

Active member
We've carried one for a few years, and used it several times - good piece of kit, takes up hardly any room. Well worth carrying.
 

Mobryan71

New member
What are "car ring attachments"??
I'm guessing split ring style key rings. I've used a contraption like that in the past, but I still prefer my bow saw. It's flat and sturdy enough to be easy to pack, works faster than any other manual saw I've tried for trail work, and has the same functional capacity as a manual chain saw. If it's too big for a good bow saw, you aren't practically going to cut it with a manual chain saw, either.

Matt
 

Howard70

Adventurer
We carry a similar manual chain saw and have used it to clear pine trunks fallen across various tracks over the last 5 years. In some conditions it is my favorite cutting tool. While we have used it with a person on each end, I find it most effective when I initially pass the chain under the trunk, staddle the log and saw with alternate pulls of my arms. While the initial length of ours was sufficient to get a good stroke, it was too short to stand up straight. After two 10" pine trunks and an aching back I girth hitched a 20 or 30 cm climbing sling to each handle. Now I can stand straight while sawing with the same stroke. If a log is 12" diameter or less and lying flat on the ground the manual chain saw is faster than either my Silky Katanaboy or Zubat. If the log leans or is more than 12" off the ground I use one of the Silkys. For clearing limbs growing over the track but still attached to trunks I use the Zubat for stuff within easy reach or the Katanaboy for higher pieces. For firewood at camp I use the Katanaboy. We don't carry a bow saw nor do we carry a motorized chainsaw (but it's sure nice to travel with someone who has a motorized saw!).

Howard Snell
 

Jnich77

Director of Adventure Management Operations
They work, but they are slow. If I was on two wheels I'd carry one. In a truck/SUV I'd carry a bow saw, or a Sawzall with a 12" pruning blade.
 

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greg.potter

Adventurer
Unless you are headed somewhere that you expect a lot of blow-down a bow saw is probably the most practical tool per kilogram (or pound) you can carry - they also don't take up much space! Mine is always tucked in beside my fridge.
 
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