Insulate underneath body?

Speedwagon

New member
Has anyone tried insulating a floor underneath the body of the van? I'm curious if this would be a viable option, given the vast amount of room under my E350. Something like foam board on the underside of the body, with a protective layer under that to keep road debris from destroying it?
 

ricardo

Observer
You can use foil-backed insulation foams, a foil moisture barrier, and marine plywood for optimal results.
What about the MOisture build up, all the materials you mention are "Hydrophibic" (like a Sponge)

sily Idea.

how about "Double Pain windows" (made out of Policarbonate, aka Lexan, aka somehow bullet proof (depending on thickness) fill with gas like a window at a house), still the iuse of the crap that will collect above them (Murphy LAW is always there to get you), maybe canver on a angle. who knows..
 

luthj

Engineer In Residence
Closed cell foams work. Some RV MFGs actually use 2 part spray foam to insulate under a vehicle. You need to have a heat shield if the foam is within 10" of the exhaust.
 

NatersXJ6

Explorer
What about the MOisture build up, all the materials you mention are "Hydrophibic" (like a Sponge)

sily Idea.

how about "Double Pain windows" (made out of Policarbonate, aka Lexan, aka somehow bullet proof (depending on thickness) fill with gas like a window at a house), still the iuse of the crap that will collect above them (Murphy LAW is always there to get you), maybe canver on a angle. who knows..
Look under any modern vehicle and you will find a foil backed foam stuck to the underside of the floor around the transmission tunnel and parts of the firewall. It is definitely a viable option.

I believe, however, that the addition of marine plywood means that suggestion was intended for the inside of the floor prior to build out.
 

luthj

Engineer In Residence
My personal preference is to use rigid foam sheets on the inside, underneath the final flooring material. Low spots between floor ribs can be filled with minicell or similar flexible closed cell foam.
 

1leglance

2007 Expedition Trophy Champion, Overland Certifie
Heatshield Products makes some really cool stuff to block the heat before it every gets into the vehicle.
I really like the Sticky Shield as I was able to apply it to the floor sheet metal under the body and above the exhaust.
The same theory could keep the heat/cool inside as well,
I have played with a few of the products and for once I am looking forward to the Phoenix summer so I can play with more Heatshield stuff and see what kind of difference it makes.
 

ricardo

Observer
Look under any modern vehicle and you will find a foil backed foam stuck to the underside of the floor around the transmission tunnel and parts of the firewall. It is definitely a viable option.

I believe, however, that the addition of marine plywood means that suggestion was intended for the inside of the floor prior to build out.
Touche..
but have you ever touch them to see how moist they are..!?

My land cruiser has some under the tranny and is wet, not just Moist Wet (turgent (it can not take any more) ..


lucky me land cruiser metal as some type of coating, bath something and is not to rusty under the mat
 

1leglance

2007 Expedition Trophy Champion, Overland Certifie
Touche..
but have you ever touch them to see how moist they are..!?

My land cruiser has some under the tranny and is wet, not just Moist Wet (turgent (it can not take any more) ..


lucky me land cruiser metal as some type of coating, bath something and is not to rusty under the mat
Another reason I am glad to live in the dry desert. We not only never have rust issues but we don't even think about the issue with doing installs :)
 

ricardo

Observer
Heatshield Products makes some really cool stuff to block the heat before it every gets into the vehicle.
I really like the Sticky Shield as I was able to apply it to the floor sheet metal under the body and above the exhaust.
The same theory could keep the heat/cool inside as well,
I have played with a few of the products and for once I am looking forward to the Phoenix summer so I can play with more Heatshield stuff and see what kind of difference it makes.
Just for Giggle I install some Dynamat at the bottom of the trany (reason why I know the OEM Shield was totally wet..

I check it a year later and the glue was holding just fine, Maybe a Layer of something like Dynamat (is so freaking Expensive) so is "WATER PROOF" (I aso test that, water those not leak out along the seams, much less on the material it self

and then whatever close cell foam you want to use..
 

ricardo

Observer
Another reason I am glad to live in the dry desert. We not only never have rust issues but we don't even think about the issue with doing installs :)
Oh men, I'm in Minneapolis and kind of broke this days..

my 7.3 is mostly Okay but my triton 10 as rust all around the bottom, even the doors, bad design if you ask me since the acumuladed dust becomes "Mud" after been in contact with the water )the bottom =under the rear turn signals, has a massive 2" channel, the four I clean were totally plug, good 4" high) and clog all the exits..
 

NatersXJ6

Explorer
I’ve used Grace ice and water shield (a roofing product) in place of dynamat for years on car rebuild projects. In Minneapolis any lumberyard would have it, about 1/4 or less of the dynamat cost and just as effective.
 

ricardo

Observer
I’ve used Grace ice and water shield (a roofing product) in place of dynamat for years on car rebuild projects. In Minneapolis any lumberyard would have it, about 1/4 or less of the dynamat cost and just as effective.
I Learn my lesson on the cruiser, to cover my $2000 the dynamat will cost me more, so i use what you are using, is "Practically" the same thing (maybe not s flexible/Playable (A heatgun makes all the difference) or glued, but it works just fine (MY triton is so quiet i need to press the throttle to see if is running or not..
 

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