INEOS' Projekt Grenadier

Bluest

New member
There's been quite a bit of progress on this over the last few days. I was invited to London, as were quite few people, to look at a VR model of the car and give feedback. And then there have been three new videos on the Youtube channel, one of which shows a very interesting chassis testing vehicle with mega ground clearance and hefty looking axles. The videos also confirm 3 locking diffs, some pretty chunky looking axles, 8 speed gearbox, body on frame, BMW petrol and diesel options and an aluminium body.

 

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Bluest

New member
Any reason to think it won’t come to the US? All the noise I’ve heard is that they are trying for global vehicle.
 

Red90

Adventurer
They are bringing it to the US. They are using world class Engineers to design it for all markets.

These guys are saying all of the right things. All the things that Land Rover is not saying.
 
They are bringing it to the US. They are using world class Engineers to design it for all markets.

These guys are saying all of the right things. All the things that Land Rover is not saying.
Nice! Well we shall see what it happens for the NAS market and how it fairs on price and availability; good info, thanks for sharing!
 

naks

Well-known member

Ineos Automotive has confirmed its Projekt Grenadier will use BMW-sourced petrol and diesel engines in the first of a series of upcoming announcements around its upcoming hardcore 4x4.

The new model, created by the Ineos chemical company owned by Britain’s richest man Jim Ratcliffe, will be revealed in 2020 before going on sale in mid-2021, the company has confirmed to Autocar.
 

mpinco

Expedition Leader
JLR's move to a Luxury Defender will open up a market segment for less complex, more field repairable vehicles. Hopefully the Ineos fills that emerging market segment.
 

Blaise

Well-known member
They are bringing it to the US. They are using world class Engineers to design it for all markets.

These guys are saying all of the right things. All the things that Land Rover is not saying.
Sorry for being pessimistic, but I can't see this happening, at least not in the US.

Non-recurring engineering costs are very high and won't be split across a large production base (think Wrangler). This will lead to a less refined, more expensive, but simpler vehicle. Fine.

However, the engineering and testing required to pass safety requirements in the US are SKY HIGH. Emissions alone are a huge challenge, but safety? You realize that if this was 'simple,' LR could have just kept the original Defender going... which wasn't feasible.

I do wish these guys the best of luck, but I cannot see a path forward for such a niche vehicle ever being sold in the US as roadgoing.
 

gatorgrizz27

Active member
Sorry for being pessimistic, but I can't see this happening, at least not in the US.

Non-recurring engineering costs are very high and won't be split across a large production base (think Wrangler). This will lead to a less refined, more expensive, but simpler vehicle. Fine.

However, the engineering and testing required to pass safety requirements in the US are SKY HIGH. Emissions alone are a huge challenge, but safety? You realize that if this was 'simple,' LR could have just kept the original Defender going... which wasn't feasible.

I do wish these guys the best of luck, but I cannot see a path forward for such a niche vehicle ever being sold in the US as roadgoing.
There has to be some exemption for kit car/off road use that can be registered by owners in most states. I’m familiar with the process due to home built boats, trailers, dirt bikes, etc.

The major issue IMO, will be the lack of parts availability and service unless they adopt the chi-com model where literally every part is interchangeable with the original Defender.

Otherwise, online parts and local enthusiast mechanics can help, but it won’t be a long term solution as far as expedition travel goes.
 

mpinco

Expedition Leader
If the vehicle is field repairable / easy maintenance I think that support model is changing. In today's world parts can be sourced from just about anywhere in the world and overnighted to your door, or even campsite. The days of have large part inventories at your corner store is long gone. Ineos could leverage the emerging model.
 

Blaise

Well-known member
There has to be some exemption for kit car/off road use that can be registered by owners in most states. I’m familiar with the process due to home built boats, trailers, dirt bikes, etc.
How many Mahidra Roxors have you seen driving around with plates? Use that as your guide. It's a huge pain in the ass and as much as I don't agree with the rules they do exist :(

Also, the Mahindra is $16k and is a literal CJ3 with all of the engineering and tooling fully depreciated (free). That's not cheap for what you get...
 

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Paddler Ed

Adventurer
If they're running BMW engines that are already US market compliant then that will be easier.

The US safety regs aren't going to be a huge distance off of a EuroNCAP 5* rating really, and if a Jeep Wrangler that scores 3 or so is saleable then I reckon someone who is designing for a global market can do that for a scratch design. Bearing in mind that the Grenadier can't look to much like the original Defender as that is going to be a protected design right, there will be scope to improve the safety sufficiently to get it to market
 
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