INEOS Grenadier

ChasingOurTrunks

Well-known member
The factory auxiliary switches in our Bronco are up there, really work pretty well. Don't need them every day but nice and in the open for when you do. Dome light switches are up there in both the Bronco and my F-150.

No idea what Ineos is putting up there though.

In the land of 8"+ touchscreen radios the fear of having "dead space" on the dash is of little concern...
The upper panel is for off-road accessories (lockers, wade mode I think, etc.) as well as auxiliary wiring (winch, lights, etc.). The main dash is for the more "close to home" controls (climate, seat heater buttons if equipped, radio, etc.).
 

nickw

Adventurer
View attachment 762121

@TCM Found this in another forum.
Judging from that pic - it's a engine pull to do a timing chain just like the BMW's along with everything else tucked in there just like a BMW. I think any / all of us can hop on the BMW forums to get a sense of how reliable these are along with what sort of maintenance req. will be needed.

I was hoping it would be much more simple.....not sure how you drop an engine any place that isn't a BMW dealership....
 

SkiWill

Active member
Judging from that pic - it's a engine pull to do a timing chain just like the BMW's along with everything else tucked in there just like a BMW. I think any / all of us can hop on the BMW forums to get a sense of how reliable these are along with what sort of maintenance req. will be needed.

I was hoping it would be much more simple.....not sure how you drop an engine any place that isn't a BMW dealership....
Obviously for a timing chain the engine would have to be pulled or transmission dropped. I think a full timing chain replacement is somewhat unlikely, though who knows as there are not a ton of high mileage engines to glean data from at this point. The far more common concern is repairing or servicing the VANOS system which is what controls the variable valve timing and will require special tools to complete. From what I have gleaned from the BMW community, expect a VANOS expedition in the 100-120k mile range and it can be done without pulling the engine. It's not cheap, and is complicated by the fact that the VANOS components will be located under the cowl, which is certainly disappointing, but not necessarily a deal breaker for me anyway.

Do I wish it had a simple naturally aspirated motor produced by someone other than BMW? Of course. I also wish I were better looking and more charismatic, but I deal with what reality gives me.
 

nickw

Adventurer
Obviously for a timing chain the engine would have to be pulled or transmission dropped. I think a full timing chain replacement is somewhat unlikely, though who knows as there are not a ton of high mileage engines to glean data from at this point. The far more common concern is repairing or servicing the VANOS system which is what controls the variable valve timing and will require special tools to complete. From what I have gleaned from the BMW community, expect a VANOS expedition in the 100-120k mile range and it can be done without pulling the engine. It's not cheap, and is complicated by the fact that the VANOS components will be located under the cowl, which is certainly disappointing, but not necessarily a deal breaker for me anyway.

Do I wish it had a simple naturally aspirated motor produced by someone other than BMW? Of course. I also wish I were better looking and more charismatic, but I deal with what reality gives me.
It's 100% likely unless you wanna push services intervals or expect to get rid of it sooner rather than later - I haven't seen any official documentation, but most timing chains are ~90-100k miles so on par with the Vanos if that data is correct, which is a full engine drop in a shop + $XXXX, never mind any mech issues in the field.
 

2.ooohhh

Active member
I'm VERY interested to see the technical manuals, BMW builds motors for multiple international markets often with quite varying specs. It's very possible that ineos could have requested a more robust international variant for this vehicle, but I will believe it when I see it. If not VANOS can be locked out and turned off within the ECU though emissions compliance could be tricky in some jurisdictions.


Historically timing chains on the BMW V8s need service more frequently than the smaller BMW motors mainly due to failures of the chain guides. I've currently got 2 of the inline 6's that are over 200k miles without having to touch the chains on them VANOS locked out on one, rebuilt on the second at 150k miles. Oil service on all BMW motors is key to long engine life in my experience.
 

Highlander

The Strong, Silent Type
AND many shops that are still Bosch service centers are unethical and provide horrific service to the customer, offer poor workmanship, and couldn't diagnose their way out of a wet paper bag. Of course the same holds true for many BMW dealerships, so YMMV.
The unfortunate situation with the service in US (and many other developed countries).
The older generation that had at least some work ethic acquired during the glory days of the American manufacturing industry is already retiring or some even have already left the workforce.

The idea that customer is always right, however ruthless it sounds, it’s pretty much out from the culture. Now they feel they are doing your favor.
I once went to a local Firestone… boy it was a sh1thole, run by illiterate baboons.

On top of this extremely complex and overtly complicated modern technology. John Deer is being sued by framers because they can’t fix anything in the new tractors.
 

Junx

New member
Like many, I put the money down to be in line, but I really doubt I’m going to to purchase anything with a BMW engine. I can’t even begin to express how unappealing the thought of that engine/tranny combo is to me. A light duty truck drivetrain from any other manufacturer would have been a vanilla choice, and perfect for the job. I just wonder who sits down to design a defender replacement, that fixes the defender reliability flaws, and picks what is essentially a car drivetrain. Weird.
Comically one of the most desirable defenders has a BMW 6 cylinder


and the Rover v8 was used in, uh... Everything.


The chevy 250 straight six was in everything from bread trucks and pickups to camaro's and chevelles.

The myth of "car engine vs truck engine" is nonsense.
 
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toddz69

Explorer
The myth of "car engine vs truck engine" is nonsense.
In most, but not all instances, I'd agree with that. I would put forth the Ford 240/300 sixes were always designed as, and run as truck engines - they never made it into cars. The same could be said of the light duty diesel engines (Ford 6.9/7.3, GM 6.2/6.5 and Dodge 5.9 Cummins).

Todd Z.
 

zimm

Expedition Leader
Comically one of the most desirable defenders has a BMW 6 cylinder


and the Rover v8 was used in, uh... Everything.


The chevy 250 straight six was in everything from bread trucks and pickups to camaro's and chevelles.

The myth of "car engine vs truck engine" is nonsense.
Telling me something is more desirable than a rover v8, isn't the same as telling me something is good.

if were gonna go all classic, keep in mind, the recipie for american pony cars was to take out the typical passenger car drivetrains, and replaced them with the high torque truck v8's, transmissions, and rear ends.
 

85_Ranger4x4

Well-known member
Obviously for a timing chain the engine would have to be pulled or transmission dropped. I think a full timing chain replacement is somewhat unlikely, though who knows as there are not a ton of high mileage engines to glean data from at this point. The far more common concern is repairing or servicing the VANOS system which is what controls the variable valve timing and will require special tools to complete. From what I have gleaned from the BMW community, expect a VANOS expedition in the 100-120k mile range and it can be done without pulling the engine. It's not cheap, and is complicated by the fact that the VANOS components will be located under the cowl, which is certainly disappointing, but not necessarily a deal breaker for me anyway.

Do I wish it had a simple naturally aspirated motor produced by someone other than BMW? Of course. I also wish I were better looking and more charismatic, but I deal with what reality gives me.
Bide your time, a LS swap kit will be coming out shortly I am sure lol.
 

Grassland

Well-known member
Yep, 4.8l GM V8 with a 4l60e and call er good. Haha.

As far as engine pull to do timing chain, plenty of Ford's get cab lifts or engine drops for major repairs on the 3.5 EB. I don't know what the Rams or GMs are like for major engine break downs. Weren't Hemis dropping valves?
Can't get the amazing HP and Torque in a broad power band without huge displacement or VVT systems anyways.
 

85_Ranger4x4

Well-known member
Yep, 4.8l GM V8 with a 4l60e and call er good. Haha.

As far as engine pull to do timing chain, plenty of Ford's get cab lifts or engine drops for major repairs on the 3.5 EB. I don't know what the Rams or GMs are like for major engine break downs. Weren't Hemis dropping valves?
Can't get the amazing HP and Torque in a broad power band without huge displacement or VVT systems anyways.
Hemis like to eat cams, radiator support removes to allow beautiful access. Not super super common but not unheard of.

Had a newer Cummins get a timing cover gasket a couple weeks ago, cab pull.
 

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