Induction cooktop???

Abitibi

Explorer

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mog

Explorer
Is anyone using one of these induction cooktop in their camper? Sounds like an interesting alternative or complement to propane or diesel cooktops.
If so, just curious how it's working out for you? I have two "house" batteries in my camper, not sure how they would handle it...
I just got a single burner (well a single oscillating magnetic field) to try out.
It would seem to be perfect for my application, ie: I try and do most of my cooking outdoors, so I need something quick-clean for the fast cup of coffee etc in the AM.
Of course the amp draw is the big concern, so some real world testing is in order before jumping in feet first (I can always us mine as a spare table top at home if it does not work out)
 

Haf-E

Expedition Leader
I use one at my off-grid house- on a 2800 watt sinewave inverter- works well but is a significant load.

I doubt it would work on a non-sinewave inverter though.

Note that pans must be magnetic to work.
 

mhiscox

Expedition Leader
I use a single "burner" one as well. It's a big load, 1500+ watts, and even if you've got the battery capacity, it'd be bad practice to suck the current out at that rate as a regular strategy. Figure it's about half-again the draw of the size of microwave you'd likely put in a camper, and you'd likely use the cooktop more. As noted, you also need ferrous cookware, which isn't widely available in the sort compact nesting backpacking cooksets you might prefer to store.

That said, they're great when you have shorepower and the right cookware. Boils water faster than even a big propane burner and they don't heat up your camper.

I got two on sale from Newegg for under $50 each. One's for camping; the other one is used in the kitchen, often in place of our supposedly mega-BTU Viking cooktop. Faster cooking and no glitches. For the reasonable cost, I can't see any reason not to try one.
 

mog

Explorer
I use one at my off-grid house- on a 2800 watt sinewave inverter- works well but is a significant load.
I doubt it would work on a non-sinewave inverter though.
Note that pans must be magnetic to work.
That was one of the questions in my future since I have not acquired my 'large' inverter yet.
Will they work with a modified sine wave inverter or do they require a true sine wave ?
 

Abitibi

Explorer
Thanks guys, seems pretty power hungry... Just got a heads up on the actual power consumption: 1800w at 12v= 150 amps
A bit too much isn't it!?!

Would be nice though!

Cheers
Mr. D
 

Abitibi

Explorer
That was one of the questions in my future since I have not acquired my 'large' inverter yet.
Will they work with a modified sine wave inverter or do they require a true sine wave ?
Someone from a sister forum tried it and said it won't work on modified sine wave. They also brought some good point to consider such as:
No open flame or CO (great for confined space)
Stove plate doesn't get hot at any time (child safe)
No issues with wind when used outside...

Hummm... I'm sure someone will try it and report back ;)
 

flightcancled

Explorer
150 amps at 12v? Seems like you are trading risks of CO and open flames for an eventual electrical fire. At that point you would need a heat sink large enough to be a plate warmer.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

mhiscox

Expedition Leader
150 amps at 12v? Seems like you are trading risks of CO and open flames for an eventual electrical fire.
You must have a perilous time starting your car. :sombrero:

Seriously, if wired correctly, 150 amps 12V DC is not an exceptionally high load. The required 150 amps can be supplied readily by a 2000 watt inverter connected to a battery bank of a few hundred amp-hours. Such a system, routinely found in boats, home solar systems and RVs (like my Sprinter conversion) is nothing very special.

The problem is not that it'll catch fire, etc. The problem is that large, fast discharges from your battery bank negatively affect the longevity of the batteries, and that's the reason I won't be running the cooktop from the batteries. The wiring itself is no big deal.
 

mhiscox

Expedition Leader
Hummm... I'm sure someone will try it and report back ;)



It'll work fine, but the quality of the inverter is, indeed, important if you run off the batteries. But as mentioned above, it'll wear out your batteries more quickly, and one would be a better choice for a camper that will generally use shorepower or generator power than one that's usually boondocking.

BTW, there's a catch to the "cooktop doesn't get hot" advantage. The cooktop doesn't create heat, but heat radiated back from the hot pot or pan will make the cooktop hot to the touch. Way safer than a gas or electric cooktop, but right after you take the pot or pan off the burner, it'll be hot enough for a minute to warrant some caution.
 

kojackJKU

Autism Family Travellers!
If I am running two HC batteries in my camper, and a 1000w inverter/generator to them, or as shore power, can I use the 800 w fairly safely?
 

DiploStrat

Expedition Leader
Love it!

Been using a single "burner" Tru Induction cooktop for some 18 months. Much, much faster than a diesel cooktop, but does not simmer as well. We use it about 90% of the time as it does not heat the camper. We did have one fail.

Typical current draw is 75A at 12v. Typical use time is under 30 minutes per meal. We do not have a generator, but the Tiger does have a very healthy battery bank.
 
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Happy Joe

Apprentice Geezer
Been looking at the 1500 watt single "burners" for tent camping (with a 2000 watt Yamaha genny); 1600 watt continuous rating. The generator is less trouble than a large battery or bank.
Everything looks do-able although I am still wrestling with whether generator powered cooking is as good or better (less trouble overall) than propane which can also be used for tent heating.
I suppose I could look into propane powering the Yamaha; or I could just stay with the antique, rusty Coleman propane 2 burner... I have a moderate battery (100 A hr.) and recharging (100 watts of solar) for the fridge.
Enjoy!
 
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