I want a 270...Alu-Cab or Ezi Awn?

CatButt

Observer
They are about the same price...both can be set up without the "legs"...but the Alu-Cab has NO legs...both seem well built, although I have very little experience with either of them.

Can anyone help me make the choice here?

Thanks
 

D90Rovin

Observer
I think I just saw an Ezi Awn pop up on Craigslist LA.....
Maybe go check it out in person since you are so close to see if it fits the bill
 

80t0ylc

Hill & Gully Rider
...both can be set up without the "legs"...but the Alu-Cab has NO legs...both seem well built, although I have very little experience with either of them.

Can anyone help me make the choice here?

Thanks
That's not accurate. Alu-Cab Shadow Awn comes with 1 "leg". If you order the "wall kit" you get the other 2 "legs" and you install them on the Awn using the installed one as the example. Easy-peasy if you have a Pop Rivet tool. I just purchased a Shadow with wall kit and installed them myself.
 

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I looked at both and have recently bought the Eezi-Awn Bat 270
The Alu-Cab is 2.6m vs 2.3 for the Eezi-Awn which would make it too long for our vehicle
The Alu-Cab weighs almost double of the Eezi-Awn and as we have the awning fixed to the side of a roof rack I was worried about the bending moment on the back corner of the rack when open - if it was hard fixed to the side of a vehicle this would not be a worry.
Although the Alu-Cab is a more solid piece of kit ( see this video https://youtu.be/CIorF9kx9GA ) the Eezi-Awn suits us well
 

CatButt

Observer
I do like the light weight factor for sure. I am going to be mounting to a Flippac. I did see the Ezi Awn on Craigslist, and that is what sparked this debate in my head/wallet.

A guy let me open and close his Alu Cab the other day and it is very nice, solid feeling unit. Needed no leg what so ever, just little 1 foot pop up leg that puts a angle in the fabric to slat it away from the truck. The bas was very well built and looked almost overbuilt...BUT it did look heavy. Now overall weight is NOT an issue...I have a 3/4 ton diesel...but the added weight to the Flippac does concern me a little. Although they are very well made, at least the shell part is, I still think less is better...can't believe I said that...LOL.

Thanks for the input from the Braintrust!
 

80t0ylc

Hill & Gully Rider
Yeah, lightweight sounds good and saving $ - until the wind starts pumping. Then you'll realize that maybe it wasn't such a good idea. Better to be overbuilt than scrambling to get it put away or chasing it down the beach or across the campground and having to repair or replace. Mike is correct, the hinge mount - where the Awn pivots needs to be extremely solid and that is not overstating. If you can imagine the leverage involved...then add what addional load the wind will add and you understand why. Think of an awning like the sail on a sailboat.
 

Corey

OverCamping Specialist
Both are good awnings, and the Eezi-Awn can be setup with no legs if there is no wind.



But the legs are attached and take just a few seconds to deploy, so I will always have mine down and staked when camping.
We all know how wind can appear like magic, so it is best to use them at all times.

 

freshlikesushi

Free Candy
Alucab is amazing.

I have it on my truck, no legs in 30 mph wind. Over that i just use the straps it has and grab it to a slider and rear shackle.
The glaring drawback is the mounting, if you know whats up, you are good to go


Amelia Island Beach Camping by Grant Wilson, on Flickr
you can see how hard that flagpole is bending in the pic.
 

rino

Supporting Sponsor - OK4WD
The Shadow Awn may seem heavy but being all aluminum it is only 54lbs, where other 270* awnings are 45+ lbs. 10 pounds well spent ;)
 

CatButt

Observer
Guys, thanks so much for the input. I am still on the fence...but one is in my near future for sure. Both are super appealing and super secksy! I need a coin to flip...LOL.
 

SOAZ

Tim and Kelsey get lost..
I've avoided getting an awning for so long because I hate setting up guide wires etc, but when the Shadow awning came along we finally went for it. So far so good. We put together a mini review, hope it's helpful.
Cheers,

 

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80t0ylc

Hill & Gully Rider
I've avoided getting an awning for so long because I hate setting up guide wires etc, but when the Shadow awning came along we finally went for it. So far so good. We put together a mini review, hope it's helpful.
Cheers,......
I enjoyed your review. I recently installed a Shadow on my '94 Land Cruiser. One thing that I'm doing, that you might consider since you mentioned concerns of getting hung up or incurring damage from brush or tree limbs, is installing limb risers. I'm currently having a front addition to my base Yakima rack fabbed to more easily accept the limb risers. My 2 biggest concerns with limb risers are 1st, not interfering with opening hood or bonnet. And 2nd, that on the upper end, they attach high enough to effectively protect roof rack and RTT. This, I believe, will also help protect the Shadow Awn. You can see my modifications to my Yakima rack system to allow the Shadow installation near the end of this thread:
http://forum.expeditionportal.com/threads/153957-Alu-Cab-Has-Landed-In-The-USA!
 

SOAZ

Tim and Kelsey get lost..
Nice work! Agreed, the limb risers would have to be darn tall to get it out of the way of the shadow awning since it sits so far forward and high. I think it could be tough to get it that high without creating other issues. Also, with limb risers, I still get hit by branches on the side. I think I need a new cover made of chainmaille. ;-)

I enjoyed your review. I recently installed a Shadow on my '94 Land Cruiser. One thing that I'm doing, that you might consider since you mentioned concerns of getting hung up or incurring damage from brush or tree limbs, is installing limb risers. I'm currently having a front addition to my base Yakima rack fabbed to more easily accept the limb risers. My 2 biggest concerns with limb risers are 1st, not interfering with opening hood or bonnet. And 2nd, that on the upper end, they attach high enough to effectively protect roof rack and RTT. This, I believe, will also help protect the Shadow Awn. You can see my modifications to my Yakima rack system to allow the Shadow installation near the end of this thread:
http://forum.expeditionportal.com/threads/153957-Alu-Cab-Has-Landed-In-The-USA!
 
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